2 Mar
2021

The Disco Biscuits ‘Spraypaint’ A Friday Night Victory On Day Two At Camp Bisco [Video]

first_imgWhat has been a stellar Camp Bisco this year, continued on Day Two with some serious sets from acts such as Odesza, Griz, Thundercat, Lettuce, 12th Planet, The Polish Ambassador, Mija, and more. And, as always, day two witnessed two full sets of pure, unadulterated Biscuits, which featured monster inverted “Mulberry’s Dream” in the first set that came out of “Caterpillar”. Also of note during the first set was the dark, techno jam that came out of “Feeling Twisted” (check it out below around the 1:22:00 mark).Second set was non-stop party as the Philly band opened up with “Strobelights & Martinis > Spraypaint”, and instead of going into “Rainbow Song” the Biscuits took a re-route to “Lunar Pursuit > Helicopters (ending only). The beginning of “Nughuffer” finished off the dyslexic version that the band began the previous day, and finished the set properly with the ending section of “Spraypaint”.Check out video of the first set from Day Two below, courtesy of UphoricTV Presents. We will update when set two is available:The Disco Biscuits Setlist – Camp Bisco – Scranton, PA – 7/15/16Set 1: Jamilia > Park Ave. > Caterpillar > Mulberry’s Dream* > Feeling Twisted > CaterpillarSet 2: Strobelights & Martinis > Spraypaint > Lunar Pursuit > Helicopter#, Spaga, Nughuffer > Spraypaint[cover photo courtesy of Dave Vann @dv_in_sf and Camp Bisco]last_img read more

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17 Jan
2021

Drought & Lawns

first_imgLast year’s prolonged drought has extended into this year. Lawns that were in poor health before the drought are having trouble greening up now. If you’re reviving a spotty lawn, perk it up with help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.   Water correctly. In the absence of rainfall, established lawns need about 1 inch of water a week. Because the soil cannot absorb that much water at one time, which results in runoff, smaller volumes of water totaling 1 inch may need to be applied at separate times during the week. For example, two half-inch applications could be made three to four days apart.Many homeowners use irrigation systems to water their lawns, and they tend to water lightly and frequently. This can result in poorly rooted turfgrass. Watering deeply and infrequently is ideal. (Remember to follow your county’s outdoor watering schedule.)Don’t guess, soil test! The proper application of fertilizer is critical to lawn health. A soil test is the best way to determine your lawn’s specific fertilizer needs. For a small fee, your local UGA Extension office can help you submit your soil to the Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories in Athens, Georgia, for testing. The results will provide you with your soil’s pH, suggestions for adjustments of that pH, and specific recommendations for the amount and timing of fertilizer application. Applying too much or too little fertilizer is a costly mistake that many homeowners make. Local waterways are often affected when excessive fertilizer runs off into stormwater drains and creeks. Aerate during the growing season. Aerification of your lawn with a core aerator increases water penetration, reduces soil compaction and encourages healthy root growth. Aeration works best if completed during the active growing season, which is now for warm-season lawns. Grow turfgrass in areas with the right light conditions. Grass doesn’t grow in the forest because trees outcompete the grass for light, water and nutrients. Turfgrasses perform better in full sun. Varieties that will tolerate some minimal shade include fescue, St. Augustinegrass and some varieties of zoysiagrass, including ‘Zeon’ and ‘JaMur.’ Consider adding a shade garden in truly shady areas where it is difficult to establish turfgrass. This will save you some frustration!Mow your lawn to the right height and at the right frequency. Mowing the lawn does more than remove excess growth — it encourages the health of the turfgrass. Mowing turfgrass too short removes excess shoot tissue that is needed to make food for the plant, thus damaging your lawn. A good rule of thumb is to mow the lawn often enough so that you don’t remove more than one-third of the leaf blade.Hybrid bermudagrass should be mowed to a height of 1 to 1.5 inches every three to four days. Centipedegrass should be mowed to 1 to 2 inches every five to 10 days. Common bermudagrass should be mowed to 1 to 2 inches every five to seven days. Tall fescue should be mowed to a height of 2 to 3 inches every five to seven days. Zoysiagrass should be mowed to 1 to 2 inches every three to seven days.Let the clips fall where they may. Do not remove grass clippings from the lawn as they return nutrients and organic matter back to the soil. Leaving grass clippings on the lawn can reduce fertilizer needs by as much as 30 percent. However, clumps of grass should be scattered since they keep sunlight from reaching the underlying grass. Use a rake or leaf blower to scatter the clumps.For more information on caring for turfgrass lawns in Georgia, visit www.GeorgiaTurf.com.last_img read more

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19 Dec
2020

Southern Legal Counsel celebrates 25 years of service

first_imgSouthern Legal Counsel celebrates 25 years of service Senior EditorIt was born of a dispute between President Nixon and Congress over the expenditures of federal monies.Its environmental work helped spawn 1,000 Friends of Florida. Carol Browner, former director of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and federal Environmental Protection Agency, was a law clerk there.It brought high profile litigation that helped close down a poorly-run state facility for disabled and retarded citizens and also closed a “training school” for juvenile delinquents that included hog-tying among its disciplinary methods.Yet few lawyers, and probably fewer Floridians, are familiar with Gainesville-based Southern Legal Counsel, a public interest law firm celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.“What this organization does is help serve people who otherwise wouldn’t have access to legal counsel,” said Tampa attorney Richard Gilbert, a member of the Bar Board of Governors and chair of SLC’s Board of Directors. “It represents indigents, children, institutionalized people; it deals with education efforts.“It takes to heart the belief of equal access to justice and tries to take those cases that provide equal access to those people who otherwise could not afford equal access.”And a key point in that mission, he added, is helping people who can’t be represented by other legal aid organizations; sort of like plugging the holes in the legal aid dike.“Our mission statement niche says we want to promote access to the courts, and we want to represent people who are un- or under-represented,” said Alice Nelson, executive director of SLC. “Part of our mission statement is to do work that other folks don’t do.. . . We’ve been very interested over the years in trying to get the human service delivery systems to operate in conformance with their broad aspirational goals.”A hole the agency is plugging now is taking class action suits representing poor people suing government, especially federal agencies. Changes to the national Legal Services Corporation last decade prohibited federal legal aid funding for those types of suits. The SLC funding for that purpose comes from The Florida Bar Foundation.Taking on orphan causes is how the organization began. It originated when Jon Mills, now the University of Florida law dean and a former speaker of the Florida House, headed up a special project to do legal research on former President Richard Nixon’s impoundment of funds authorized by Congress.Mills was looking to a third-year law student to help with the work, but a second-year student, Al Hadeed, made such a persuasive case, that Mills took him on.“It started as a funded public interest research project at the University of Florida to study presidential impoundment of congressional appropriations,” Hadeed recalled. “We provided information for congressional committees, particularly in the Senate.”The project also did amicus briefs, including for the U.S. Supreme Court when it handled the issue. “The courts were quoting us, or citing us, or referring to us and that emboldened us,” Hadeed said, and the project began looking at other areas.But at the same time, “The university law school. . . decided that the pursuit of public interest litigation needed to be physically outside the law school, but affiliated with the law school through using faculty and students,” Hadeed said.That led to the creation of the center in 1977. The first Board of Directors included former Bar and ABA President Chesterfield Smith; then UF law Dean Richard Julin; former Gov. LeRoy Collins; attorney Randolph Thrower, a former commissioner of the IRS who stood up to Nixon over the misuse of IRS records; and Rod Petrie, former director of the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation and now director of the LeRoy Collins Center in Tallahassee.Mills headed the new organization for its first few months and then Hadeed, now a licensed attorney, became the executive director and the only staffer.“They were looking for some single guy who didn’t care about launching into an unsure venture,” he said with a laugh, noting the country was in recession and grant money for such ventures was drying up from private foundations. Nonetheless, the public interest law firm was organized and open. They found no shortage of issues.“We operated on a shoestring budget,” Hadeed said. “We tried very carefully to pick our initial cases. We knew that those cases would define us for many years. This is why the board was so valuable; they had a good feel for public policy issues in Florida and those that weren’t getting attention.”Nelson and Hadeed said among the cases and issues that have involved and defined SLC over the years include:• Bringing court cases to enforce Florida’s landmark Sunshine Laws. Although approved by voters as a constitutional amendment at the behest of former Gov. Reubin Askew, those laws were not followed or enforced in their early years. Southern Legal Counsel’s efforts included bringing a case that eventually went to the Florida Supreme Court over a legislatively proposed amendment in 1982 that would have repealed much of Askew’s sunshine amendment. The SLC successfully got the amendment struck, arguing its ballot language was misleading and could cause voters to vote the opposite of what they intended.• Brought federal lawsuits that wound up closing substandard state facilities for the disabled, retarded, and juvenile delinquents. Efforts in the latter case lead to a whole new juvenile justice act in Florida.• Presented the factual data in the case that led to the approval of the Interest on Trust Accounts program.• Handled many environmental cases which led to the SLC helping form 1,000 Friends of Florida. SLC was 1,000 Friends’ general counsel for its first several years.• Formed a relationship with the Advocacy Center for People with Disabilities that resulted in several groundbreaking cases. SLC also has a long interest advocating for the education rights of children with disabilities. The agency, Nelson said, is working on a conference set for next month to bring IOTA grantees and other interested parties on that issue.Nelson attributed the success on the broad range of issues to the leadership of SLC’s board. Members over the years have included former Bar and ABA President Wm. Reece Smith, Florida State University President Sandy D’Alemberte, late Supreme Court Chief Justice Alan Sundberg, Marilyn Holifield, F. Malcolm Cunningham, and many others. A complete list — as well as more information about the organization — is on the SLC’s website at www.southernlegal.org. Current board members include former Bar President Steve Zack, former U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge and Florida Supreme Court Justice Joseph Hatchett, former Supreme Court Justice Raymond Ehrlich, former St. Thomas University law Dean Jacqueline Allee, and attorneys Eli Subin and Bill Wagner.Over the years, the staff has grown to three attorneys, plus an additional position funded by the National Association of Public Interest Law program. Nelson said the agency would like to find additional funding to add two to three more attorneys as well as offering internships.“We’re interested in a program that would bring young lawyers in for a couple years,” Nelson said. “It would emphasize public service and pro bono work, and give people an opportunity to be exposed so when they go on to the rest of their careers, they remain exposed to public interest work.”Preliminary plans for the 25th anniversary celebration include dinner for current and past board members on June 20 during the Bar’s Annual Meeting in Boca Raton. Southern Legal Counsel celebrates 25 years of service March 15, 2002 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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20 Sep
2020

Lucerne Golf Club Senior Scramble results

first_imgDEDHAM — The Lucerne Golf Club will celebrate its 90-year anniversary on Sunday, July 10. Results from the club’s Senior Scrambles on Tuesday, July 5, and Thursday, July 7, are as follows:July 5: Bill Brooks, Mike Dore, Ron Snyder, Marcelle Whitney (-5); Daryl Briggs, Ron Linscott, Mike Hutchins, Dick Gassett (-5); Hank Hosking, Ed Lachance, Ted Brown, Dennis Kiah (-5); Bruce Blanchard, Bob McKenney, Russ Black, Lloyd Deans (4); Bill Ferris, Jim Awalt, Jack Hinds, Bruce Mac Gregor (-4); Ken Goldstein, Doug Deans, Bob Francis, John Somes (-4); Gardon Warner, Mark Molnar, Bob Carter, Dan Crouse (-3); Mark Johnson, Ben Sawyer, Paul Bowden, Dave Robertson (-3) Grant Standbrook, Russ Black, Carl Williams, Bob Wilks (-3); Mel McLay, Gordon Holmes, Phil Carroll, Jim Bonzey (-3); Bruce Tabor, Larry Orcutt, Richard Baker, Ron Allen (-2); Mel Bowden, Charlie Perkins, Royce Morrison, Barry Harris (-2); Kerry Woodbury, Alan Gray, Robin Young, Bob Landis. (-1). Pins: No. 2 Charlie Perkins (5.5) and No. 6 Ted Brown (9.9).July 7: Doug Deans, Tom Winston, Ken Goldstein, Ron Snyder (-6); Bob Wilks, Jack Hinds, Dave Robertson, Royce Morrison (-5); Richard Baker, Joe Guaraldo, Bob Francis, Dick Gassett (-5); Mel McLay, Daryl Briggs, Ed Lachance, Bill Ferris (-5); Bill Brooks, Alan Cust, Bob Landis, Howard Flewelling (-4); Grant Lee, Don McCubbin, Lloyd Deans, Dennis Kiah (-4); Grant Standbrook, Bob Carter, Charlie Perkins, Barry Harris (-3); Marcelle Whitney, Ted Brown, Ben Sawyer, Bruce MacGregor (-3); Kerry Woodbury, Bob Fraser, Mike Dore, Bruce Blanchard (-1); Ron Allen, Robin Young, Phil Carroll, Jim Awalt (-2); Paul Bowden, Ted Pierson, Jim Mabry, Jim Bonzey (-1); John Somes, Bob Fraser, Mark Johnson, Bob Mc Kenney (-1). Pins: No. 2 Dave Robertson (11.2) and No. 6 Grant Standbrook (3.10).This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

SB : Syracuse to open home schedule with historic two games inside Carrier Dome

first_img Comments Published on March 21, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nicktoneytweets Facebook Twitter Google+center_img After an email from the Alabama athletic department planted the idea in Leigh Ross’ mind in 2006, she became captivated with the thought of the Syracuse softball team hosting a game inside the Carrier Dome.For the Syracuse head coach, the opportunity was too unique to pass up, especially when the Crimson Tide was offering to travel north for a three-game series. So Ross, then in her first season at the helm, promised to make the Carrier Dome host Orange softball one day.‘I didn’t even know we were practicing inside, so that email from Alabama was the first bug I got,’ Ross said of the email.It took almost six years, but Ross’ dream will finally take place this weekend. SU will play two games this weekend in the Carrier Dome – the first softball games played in Syracuse’s iconic arena.Though the Duel at the Dome tournament will feature Colgate and Canisius as the Orange’s opponents instead of an Alabama tripleheader, SU decided to take advantage of an early bye week in its Big East schedule to host the games inside.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn Thursday, the crew at the Carrier Dome will transform the football and lacrosse field into a softball diamond for two games this weekend. Syracuse will play indoors for its first home game of the season Friday when it takes on Colgate at 7 p.m. The Orange will play the second game against Canisius on Saturday at 6 p.m.‘We don’t get to play too many home games because of the weather,’ Ross said. ‘I think players are excited to have friends and family come be a part of something like this.’Ross said SU plans on making the Duel at the Dome an annual tournament. Next year, the Orange anticipates hosting teams earlier in the nonconference schedule when the weather makes outdoor games impossible.Even though SU could play outside this weekend in the unseasonably warm weather, second baseman Stephanie Watts is excited to be part of the first home game in the Carrier Dome.‘The weather isn’t traditionally like this in March,’ Watts said. ‘We love to play outside, but I think this can be a great jumping off point for SU going forward. The Carrier Dome is such a landmark here, so I think it’s awesome for everyone involved.’Watts said that if Syracuse plans to make the Duel at the Dome an annual event, freshmen players may get the most from SU’s first Dome game. She said that younger players can get a feel for the Carrier Dome early. Then they can use that knowledge to their advantage against opponents later to establish a home-field advantage at the Dome.This Orange team may not yet know how the ball bounces on the Carrier Dome turf. But if this weekend is as big a success as Ross hopes, that knowledge could come in handy against marquee opponents.Catcher Lacey Kohl doesn’t want this game to be a novelty. The softball program can use the games this weekend to gain more national attention, and it has shown that the athletic department is devoting more attention to the softball program.‘It really means a lot that everything they’re doing is geared toward making the Dome more softball-friendly,’ Kohl said. ‘Even small things like screwing the bases into the turf make a difference. That’s what softball schools do.’What’s good for traditional softball powers should be good for the up-and-comers like SU. Two weeks ago, the Orange defeated three ranked opponents at the Citrus Classic tournament in Orlando, Fla. The team has also played Arizona, UCLA and California – three elite softball programs.A successful Duel at the Dome could mean more emails in Ross’ inbox from those teams about traveling to play SU for a change.‘I think ultimately it brings more attention to our program,’ Ross said. ‘It’ll be neat for the girls to play in this game.’[email protected]last_img read more

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28 Aug
2020

Real Madrid hold Barcelona to Copa del Rey draw

first_imgUnder-pressure Jose Mourinho saw his Real Madrid side come from behind to draw the first leg of their Copa del Rey semi-final with rivals Barcelona.Barca took the lead after a goalless first half at the Bernabeu when Lionel Messi played in Cesc Fabregas, who calmly fired past debutant Diego Lopez.Cristiano Ronaldo then sent a stooping header just wide as the hosts pushed for an equaliser.The reply finally came when the impressive Raphael Varane headed home.It was the visitors who had come closest to opening the scoring in the first half when Xavi’s free-kick hit the bar after 20 minutes.He had a second chance after a poor backpass by Ricardo Carvalho, but 19-year-old defender Varane rescued his veteran partner by clearing off the line. The league leaders deservedly went in front, however, when Fabregas fired home after 50 minutes.Only a brilliant Gerard Pique tackle denied Ronaldo a leveller, but the goal the hosts sought came with nine minutes remaining through former Lens defender Varane.The second leg is at the Nou Camp on 27 February.The other semi-final will be contested between Atletico Madrid and Sevilla.last_img read more

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