4 Jun
2021

Wood burning stoves put thatched homes at risk

first_img TAGSfireLimerick City and County CouncilTom Cassidytraditional thatched cottages Call to extend Patrickswell public sewer line Advertisement WhatsApp Facebook New parklet changes Catherine Street dining experience Email Previous articleComptroller and Auditor General’s office to report on UL auditNext articleWin cinema tickets Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsLocal NewsWood burning stoves put thatched homes at riskBy Bernie English – February 24, 2018 2266 Printcenter_img Linkedin Limerick’s O’Connell Street Revitalisation Works to go ahead Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Thatched cottage The owners of traditional thatched cottages who install wood-burning stoves are running a serious risk of having a house fire.That was the message from the Conservation Officer of Limerick City and County Council this week, when he told a meeting of elected members of the council that a number of the county’s thatched cottages had been lost to fire.Conservation Officer, Tom Cassidy was addressing a request to members of the KIlmallock and Cappamore district of the council to remove a listed thatch cottage from the record of protected structures.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He told the meeting that ten buildings have been lost lost to fires from the protected structures record in Limerick in the last five years.“In many cases, the fires can be attributed to wood-burning stoves being installed. The problem is that in Ireland, we’re not very good at seasoning our wood for two years,” Mr Cassidy told the meeting.“Wood that hasn’t been properly seasoned still contains sap and this adheres to the inside of the flues and catches fire. A wind lifts the material and the thatch goes up.“This happens around two years after a wood burning stove has been installed,” he explained.Mr Cassidy said that the high heat generated by burning wood in a stove can contribute to the hazard.“People should be aware that installing a wood-burning stove in a protected structure requires planning permission. There’s a reason we require people to do these things. Installing a wood burning stove can be the death-knell of a thatched house,” he told the meeting.Asked whether it was possible to control such modifications, Mr Cassidy said his department “does not have enough staff to go around knocking on doors and asking people if they have installed a wood stove”.He told members of the area committee that there are currently more than 200 thatched cottages in county Limerick.More local news here. Ireland’s First Ever Virtual Bat Walk to take place in Limerick Limerick city centre gets a deep clean O’Donnell Welcomes Major Enhancement Works for Castletroy Neighbourhood Park last_img read more

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9 May
2021

Multi-year observations on the gametogenic ecology of the Antarctic seastar Odontaster validus

first_imgThis study reports the first multi-year observations on the reproductive patterns for an Antarctic predator/scavenger, Odontaster validus (Koehler 1912). Seastars were collected monthly from a shallow site (15–20 m depth) near the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Rothera Research Station (Adelaide Island, 67°34′S 68°08′W) from July 1997 to January 2001. Reproductive condition, oocyte size frequencies and spermatogenesis were examined in at least ten seastars each month using histological and image analysis techniques. Gonad indices (GI) and pyloric caeca indices (PI) were also examined in the same samples. Female and male GIs varied seasonally, in parallel with a reduction in the proportion of large oocytes and mature sperm in the gonad in August to mid-October following winter spawning. Despite there being remarkable consistency in the timing of spawning from year to year, differences in the reproductive condition of individuals were apparent. Patterns in the digestive tissues also varied with season, peaking in December and reaching a minimum in February in two of the three study years. This weaker annual pattern may partly reflect the varied diet of this predator/scavenger species, which is not directly dependant on the timing and magnitude of the annual phytoplankton bloom. Pooled oocyte size distributions and residual analysis suggested that oogenesis progressed over 18–24 months, with the largest of the two size classes (maximum diameter = 183 μm) being spawned annually. This pattern of oocyte growth and spawning was previously reported in the early 1960s for an O. validus population from McMurdo Sound, which lies south of Rothera by 10° latitude. The extremely catholic diet of this predator/scavenger suggests the reproductive patterns of the seastar will be less susceptible to changes in food supply compared to polar suspension feeders or deposit feeders.last_img read more

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20 Dec
2019

Antonio Brown returns to college, registers for four classes including Death and Dying

first_imgWhen Bill Walsh returned for a second tour of duty as Stanford’s head football coach, he said, “This is my bliss.”When the Rodney Dangerfield character went “Back to School,” he said, “The high school I went to, they asked a kid to prove the law of gravity. He threw the teacher out the window!”Big news in academia. Ex-Steeler, Ex-Raider and Ex-Patriot Antonio Brown is apparently going back to school. AB … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile devicelast_img

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12 Dec
2019

Hands-On Gear Review: The Versatile DJI Ronin-S Gimbal

first_imgThis gimbal is one of the most intuitive stabilizers on the market, and it could definitely benefit your production. Read on for our full review.Our friends at DJI occasionally send us some amazing toys to try out, like the Hasselblad X-1D or the Inspire 2, but we’ve been looking forward to this one for a long time. The Ronin-S comes from a long line of quality DJI stabilizers popular among industry professionals. DJI’s gimbals have, for the most part, been large-format, double-handled bar-gimbals, like the original Ronin, but the Ronin-S is a one-handed pole gimbal for mirrorless cameras and DSLRs. Here’s what we learned shooting with it for the past few weeks. Payload capacity tested to 8 lbs.Manfrotto Quick Release Plate.12 Hours of battery life with a 2 1/2-hour quick charge time.Net weight of 4.1 lbs.Compatibility with most mirrorless cameras and DSLRs.360-degree rotation capability.Sport Mode for quick tracking.Joystick for precision panning and tilting.Finger trigger for quick changes to settings.Ronin App functionality via Bluetooth.Price: $699Let’s break down some of these features.The finger trigger is probably my favorite feature on the Ronin-S. Instead of switching to different modes to keep your camera at your desired angle, holding the trigger will lock your camera in a fixed position, and you can move the gimbal around however you like. Once you release the trigger, the camera will reset to the gimbal’s gyroscopic center. It’s an incredibly simple and useful addition that gives you a lot more maneuverability when tracking a subject.The sport mode is a setting on the gimbal that makes the Ronin pan and tilt at wildly impressive speeds, so you can track a fast-moving subject or do a quick whip pan.The Bluetooth-compatible DJI app is also a great tool. It lets you access the gimbal remotely, and it allows you to program specific movements or make slower timelapse-friendly movements.The 12-hour battery life is a bit shorter than the Zhiyun Crane 2, but its quick charge capability, via a USB-C port on the battery grip, lets you charge the Ronin-S with a simple cable — instead of taking the gimbal apart to charge the batteries.So, Why Do You Need This?Of course, there are a ton of stabilization options out there. What makes the Ronin-S so special? Well, to me, the price tag is unreal for the features. Any other stabilizer with the same features will cost hundreds of dollars more. The only gimbal that rivals this price is the Zhiyun Crane, but it’s only $100 cheaper with fewer features. Don’t get me wrong — the Crane 2 is an incredible gimbal, but after handling the Ronin-S (after using the Zhiyun for the past year), the difference between the two is pretty clear. So if you can spend an extra $100 for $500 worth of extra features, then I suggest going with the Ronin-S.You can also handle this gimbal upside-down, which lets you get some awesome shots close to the ground. This might not be a feature you use all the time, but, hey, it can come in handy one day if your video calls for a moving macro shot of a field of daffodils.I’ve also noticed that the stabilization algorithm that DJI uses is far superior to other gimbals on the market. With other gimbals, if you take a hard step, you’ll get some shake in your footage. The Ronin-S’s powerful motor limits the shake caused by running or jumping. This means you can do some crazy camera maneuvers with the camera in your hands, a la parkour. Think of the crazy shots you can get).All in all, if you’re looking for a long-lasting gimbal that’s going to work with any of your small to mid-sized cameras, the Ronin-S is the one. From indie filmmakers to professional cinematographers — anyone can get the job done with the Ronin-S.You can find out more at DJI.com.Looking for more on video gear? Check out these articles.A Guide to In-Camera Multiple-Exposure Photography with the Canon 5D Mark IVThe Blackmagic eGPU: The Graphics Upgrade Your Mac NeedsA Look At The Unmatched Versatility of the Canon C700FFThis DIY Roger Deakins Style Ring Light Costs Less Than $150Tips for Shooting Super High-Speed Footage with the Phantom Flex 4K The First LookRight out of the box, you notice the Ronin-S’s amazing build quality. It feels solid and well designed, and it has ergonomic grips on the handle for easy one-handed use. Its sleek metal design is gorgeous.The button layout is simple and straightforward, and the joystick is extremely responsive — it’s easy to manipulate, even with just one hand. It is a bit on the heavy side, but the extra length on the bottom of the detachable battery leaves ample room for double-handed handling.One of my favorite aspects of this gimbal is that the head is at an angle to the base to prevent blockage of the camera’s LCD screen (which has been a problem with our Zhiyun Crane).The Specslast_img read more

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12 Dec
2019

Action Hits Toolkit: 70+ Free Action Compositing Elements

first_imgDownload the Action Hits Toolkit: 70+ Action Compositing ElementsClick the button below to download the Action Hits Toolkit. In the download, you’ll find everything you need to get started. These elements are free to use in any personal or commercial projects. By downloading, you agree not to resell or redistribute these free assets.(This is a relatively large download, so settle in.)DOWNLOAD ACTION HITS TOOLKIT: 70+ ACTION COMPOSITING ELEMENTSHow to Use The Action Hits Toolkit of 70+ Action Compositing ElementsWe created this pack of 70+ action compositing elements with experimentation in mind. There are many different ways you can use these elements, from compositing your action scenes to adding some really nice texture and excitement to motion graphics.Almost all of these elements will find their best use in Adobe After Effects; however, they will work in any major nonlinear editing software.We shot these elements against a black background; this way all you need is the appropriate blending mode to include them in your own project. The best blending modes to use will be “Add,” “Linear Dodge” (add), or “Screen.” However, you may be able to get interesting results using other blend modes. Again, experiment!My personal favorite part of this pack is the “Magic Sci/Fi toolkit.” This aspect of the Action Hits Toolkit is purely for experimentation and creating cool effects and looks that you might have never thought of before.With some spark circles inspired by Doctor Strange, interesting orbs created with a lens ball, and some colorful magical spark/spell hits, you can mix these elements to create fantasy effects, sci-fi effects, or anything in between.100% Practical EffectsWe shot these elements and effects practically in 4K in our studio using quite a few different techniques and methods.Stay tuned for behind-the-scenes content about how we created these elements.BONUS: More FREE Action ElementsNeed more free elements?Our friends at RocketStock released a pack of 25 completely free action compositing elements with Action Pack Lite. This includes full-blown explosions, fire, smoke, dust, and more. Between these two packs, you can have a completely free action elements library with anything you could want.Enjoy!Still not enough freebies? Check these out.SPACE KIT: Download 40+ Free Space Textures and Elements21 Free Motion Graphics Templates for Adobe Premiere Pro17 Free Anamorphic Lens Flares for Your Videos and Motion Graphics With over 70 action compositing elements for your videos and motion graphics, the Action Hits Toolkit has everything you need for your next action sequence.With the Action Hits Toolkit — a pack of more than 70 dirt hits, spark hits, muzzle flashes, fantasy hits, and much more — you can finally craft that elaborate action scene you’ve been dreaming about. Perfect for VFX compositing and for adding excitement to your motion graphic design, this pack has a little bit of everything to help you bring some explosive power to your work.The Action Hits Toolkit Includes the following:13 dirt/dust hits.17 spark hits and falling spark elements.2 smoke hits.5 fantasy/sci-fi hits.3 muzzle flashes.31 miscellaneous elements for creating your own effects (magic hits, orbs, spark circles, energy fields, etc.).last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Stanford group creates miniature selfcontained fluorescence microscope

first_img Researcher Mark Schnitzer demonstrates the microscope’s tiny size and weight. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Microscope could ‘solve the cause of viruses’ More information: Miniaturized integration of a fluorescence microscope, Nature Methods (2011) doi:10.1038/nmeth.1694AbstractThe light microscope is traditionally an instrument of substantial size and expense. Its miniaturized integration would enable many new applications based on mass-producible, tiny microscopes. Key prospective usages include brain imaging in behaving animals for relating cellular dynamics to animal behavior. Here we introduce a miniature (1.9 g) integrated fluorescence microscope made from mass-producible parts, including a semiconductor light source and sensor. This device enables high-speed cellular imaging across ~0.5 mm2 areas in active mice. This capability allowed concurrent tracking of Ca2+ spiking in >200 Purkinje neurons across nine cerebellar microzones. During mouse locomotion, individual microzones exhibited large-scale, synchronized Ca2+ spiking. This is a mesoscopic neural dynamic missed by prior techniques for studying the brain at other length scales. Overall, the integrated microscope is a potentially transformative technology that permits distribution to many animals and enables diverse usages, such as portable diagnostics or microscope arrays for large-scale screens. Citation: Stanford group creates miniature self-contained fluorescence microscope (2011, September 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-09-stanford-group-miniature-self-contained-fluorescence.html (PhysOrg.com) — A team of researchers working at Stanford University have devised a means for building the smallest self-contained fluorescence microscope ever. Weighing just under 2 grams and slightly larger than the end of a pencil, the new microscope is small enough to attach to a mouse head, which means researchers can watch the mouse brain in a natural setting. Led by Mark Schnitzer and Abbas El Gamal, the team describes its findings in Nature Methods. One downside to the new microscope is that its resolution isn’t quite as good as standard bench models; 2.5 microns as opposed to 0.5. But it does have a larger field of view, which means that most serious labs would likely want to have both types of microscopes, depending on what is being studied.While it’s difficult to say what new discoveries might be made with a microscope that allows researchers to watch a mouse brain in action (on a computer screen) as the mouse goes about its normal activities, it’s probably safe to say, that many of them are likely to be quite illuminating.Schnitzer and some of his colleagues have founded a company they call Inscopix to develop the new microscope and bring it to market, thought they can’t say yet, when that might be. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Till now, most brain researchers have had to use so-called bench-top microscopes, which are what they sound like; microscopes that sit on a bench. This requires that specimens be brought to the microscope (and held still) for examination. This new microscope turns that whole process around in that it allows the microscope to be brought to the specimen, allowing researchers to study the brain in ways that have not been possible before. The team reports that they have already discovered new capillary dilation properties in mouse brains.The fluorescence microscope differs from traditional microscopes in that it looks at material that has a fluorescence property, i.e. is fluorescent (the emission of light by a material when exposed to radiation). To take advantage of this property specimens must be either naturally fluorescent (such as certain proteins) or stained with a fluorescent material. The approach is similar to that seen when a black-light is used to illuminate semen or blood samples at crime scenes. The light sources used in a fluorescence microscope are typically xenon arc or mercury-vapor lamps.The miniaturized microscope developed by the team is comprised of mass produced parts, which the team says will allow for it to be mass produced at a much lower cost than standard bench-microscopes, opening the door to research at places that have up till now lacked the funds to purchase the more expensive equipment. Design and fabrication of an integrated fluorescence microscope. Image: NPG, Nature Methods (2011) doi:10.1038/nmeth.1694last_img read more

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