4 Jun
2021

Online book of condolence for the late Jack Charlton

first_imgLimerickNewsSportSoccerOnline book of condolence for the late Jack CharltonBy Editor – July 16, 2020 168 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Facebook TAGSJack CharltonKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Advertisement Previous articleGuiding the city out of lockdownNext articleStephen Kenny’s selection headache: Ireland’s fantastic front four Editor Email Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash center_img Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Linkedin WhatsApp Print Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live MAYOR Michael Collins has opened an online book of condolence for the late Jack Charlton which will remain open until Tuesday, July 21st when it will be collated and sent to the FAI who will forward it to the Charlton family.Mayor Collins said that Jack Charlton held a special place in the hearts and minds of Irish people, thanks to his time as manager of the Irish Football Team and the success he brought in steering the team to their first ever finals appearances in the World Cup and European Championships.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “I would like people to sign the book and leave their tributes to the late football manager,” he added. The book of condolence can be accessed through the council website www.limerick.ie Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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7 May
2021

Scottish Government revises property tax after UK stamp duty changes

first_imgDeputy First Minister John Swinney has announced a series of changes to the Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) – which will replace stamp duty for homebuyers in Scotland – following Chancellor George Osborne’s amends to stamp duty in his Autumn Statement in December.Among the headline amendments, is the fact that homes in Scotland worth up to £145,000 will not now attract any tax, up from the previously proposed £135,000.For sales between £145,000 and £250,000, a tax rate of 2 per cent will be applied, with the introduction of a new rate of 5 per cent between £250,000 and £325,000.Mr Swinney had previously planned a tax rate of 10 per cent on residential properties sold for between £250,000 and £1 million – prompting concerns that those acquiring family homes could be hit.However, the 10 per cent rate will be applied to properties valued between £325,000 and £750,000.The top rate of 12 per cent – which was previously going to apply to residential properties worth in excess of £1 million – will now take effect from £750,000.The Deputy First Minister defended the Scottish national Party’s (SNP) decision to change the taxes following the Chancellor’s surprise decision to reform UK stamp duty.“The Chancellor of the Exchequer, having had years and years to reform stamp duty land tax, took two months to look at Scotland’s reforms and said ‘that looks like a good idea, I’m going to do that for the rest of the United Kingdom’,” said Swinney (left).The property tax review announced last week by Swinney was deemed disappointing news for buyers and sellers of Scottish homes by estate agency Strutt & Parker.While the changes to the LBTT rates could boost the market for first-time buyers and the lower end of the sector, Strutt & Parker believe that the middle sector of the market will suffer under the introduction of the new house sales tax which will replace Stamp Duty Land Tax in Scotland on April 1.Andrew Rettie (right), Head of Estate Agency for Strutt & Parker in Scotland, commented: “While LBTT will help first-time – the average price of a house in Scotland is £170,000 – it has been widely derided as an unfair attack on families and a punitive tax on aspiration, particularly in the affluent centres of Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen. The changes announced [last week] are no better.“Strutt & Parker backed the Scottish Conservatives’ proposals for the introduction of a mid-tier rate of five per cent between £250,001 and £500,000 and we were hopeful that Mr Swinney would introduce something along those lines but while this review offers a concession to the lower end of the market it is a blow to everyone else and a missed opportunity to provide a fillip to the property. If families can’t upsize because of the increase in tax, they will not sell, leading to a stalemate in the middle of the market, which is really the engine room of a thriving housing sector.”Commenting on the revised LLBTT, Philip Hogg, Chief Executive of home building industry body, Homes for Scotland, said: “We are pleased that the Deputy First Minister has paid some notice to our call for the introduction of a new intermediate band with the five per cent rate for property purchases between £250,000 and £325,000.”Mr Hogg also welcomed additional support at market entry level, but insisted that a healthy, functioning market for all price brackets is needed.“It therefore remains to be seen whether the sharp ten per cent increase for purchases above £325,000 could still prove too punitive on growing families and aspirational movers, leading them to stay put and others unable to progress up the housing ladder,” he added.Knight Frank has welcomed the fact that the Scottish Government has decided to revise the LBTT rates.“The changes will help lessen the tax burden of those purchasing fairly modest family homes in core locations of Scotland,” said Oliver Knight (right), Knight Frank Residential Research.“Under the original LBTT rates, homebuyers in Edinburgh, Aberdeen and parts of Glasgow – where prices for larger family houses tend to be higher – would all have seen a sharp rise in the up-front cost of moving.”“The new LBTT rates mean that the threshold at which buyers will pay more tax compared to the current UK stamp duty system has risen from £254,000 to £330,000,” he added.Edward Douglas-Home, Head of Edinburgh City Sales at Knight Frank, concurred: “The new rates are likely to be welcomed by homebuyers, especially in Edinburgh where the cost of housing is higher relative to the rest of the country. The biggest beneficiaries will be middle income families looking to move up the housing ladder.“The average cost of a detached family home in Edinburgh is around £390,000, rising to a lot more in some parts of the city, such as in Morningside, The Grange and Murrayfield, as well as for the terraced town houses of New Town and the West End. Under the original rates proposed a property of this value would have been liable for a £16,300 tax bill. The revised rates mean the LBTT charge for the same property will now be £12,350 or 24 per cent less.“The new bands should help to keep the market fluid and ensure that the recovery in prices and transactions that we have seen over the few years continues.”property tax Scotland stamp duty January 28, 2015The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » Scottish Government revises property tax after UK stamp duty changes previous nextRegulation & LawScottish Government revises property tax after UK stamp duty changes28th January 20150656 Viewslast_img read more

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7 May
2021

Fake Zoopla invoice payment phishing email circulating, agents are warned

first_imgEstate agents who list their properties with Zoopla are being warned to stay vigilant after a phishing email began circulating yesterday sent by criminals hoping to dupe companies into parting with their cash.The email, which is similar to those some agents have received in the past, look credible at first glance and are branded twice with the Zoopla logo. They also feature the portal’s real customer support number and email address.But the text urges agents to pay three outstanding invoices for services supplied by Zoopla and click links to documents hosted on a dubious-looking website for Antarctic exploration enthusiasts, www.waponline.it.Agents are asked to pay their outstanding invoices to ‘ZPG Ltd’ via a European HSBC bank account, funds which they are clearly unlikely to ever see again.But although the links within the email go to what appears to be the Zoopla Pro login page, in reality it’s a cloned version designed to trick agents into revealing their login details.The scammers will then login into an agency’s Pro account and harvest sensitive data.Agents should watch out for emails with the subject line ‘Zoopla Invoices from Zoopla Property Group’ flagged up as urgent within their inboxes.The agents who sent us the email, who doesn’t wish to identified, says they believe the scammers are targeting agents via their social media profiles.“We’re aware that online fraudsters are targeting portal users with phishing emails in an effort to get them to share login details. The security of our agent partners is a key priority for us and regularly share with them advice on how to keep their businesses secure. If any agent does have concerns they can contact their Account Manager who will be happy to help them,” says a Zoopla spokesperson.The fake emailphishing email Zoopla June 11, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Fake Zoopla invoice payment phishing email circulating, agents are warned previous nextRegulation & LawFake Zoopla invoice payment phishing email circulating, agents are warnedCredible-looking emails asking agents to pay outstanding invoices to an HSBC account are designed to also dupe agents into revealing their Zoopla Pro account logins.Nigel Lewis11th June 202001,508 Viewslast_img read more

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