12 Jun
2021

Bringing Your Pet to Life

first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 8 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News Herbeauty11 Ayurveda Heath Secrets From Ancient IndiaHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Gorgeous Looks That Have Been Classic Go-tos For DecadesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop 9 Predicted Haircut Trends Of 2020HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyDo You Feel Like Hollywood Celebrities All Look A Bit Similar?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Any pet owner will tell you that there are few things more important than their little furry (or scaly, or feathered, or hooved) friend. There are many pet owners who will admit to having more pictures of their animals than their own family (not that that’s a bad thing!).Those photos become even more important after we’ve had to say goodbye.Leah Knecht has been painting since she was a child, and she has turned her love for animals into a career of portrait painting of both animals and people. But it was the loss of her own beloved pets that led her to it.“I started [painting portraits] five years when I lost a couple of my dogs. Then I started doing this for other people too.”Knecht loved to paint as a child. She eventually attended Pasadena’s Art Center College of Design, majoring in illustration, later becoming a full time teacher of the art of oil painting.“Illustration involves bringing out the best in an image through understanding of anatomy, form, tones, lighting, and detail,” she explains.“Painting these portraits is something I really love doing,” she confesses. “I love animals, and I grew up with tons of them. Our house was like a mini-farm, here on the edge of Pasadena. We had goats, chickens, ducks, cats dogs, birds, you name it!”Through the combination of growing up with animals, and her own training and teaching in the art of illustration, Knecht portrays animals in a way that truly brings them to life.“I think I can really capture the pet’s personality in a very real way,” she explained. “Other artists can portray the pet in a pop art or abstract style, but, mine, actually looks like their pet. I can also add backgrounds, or change backgrounds, or do group portraits.”Knecht can also work from old photographs to vividly bring the pet back to life. She of course, credits her training, as well as her clear understanding of anatomy, to recreate the pet’s own individual look.Knecht’s ability to work from photographs and closely with her customers allows her to create accurate and meaningful portraits for those who have had to part with their best friends.One client, who’s husband’s beloved Pekingese passed well after they received their portrait, expressed just how meaningful it is to him now: “The portrait is a constant, comforting, reminder for him, almost like having her here with us. ”Another commented, “You captured Cole’s personality, not just his looks.” Of course, any pet owner can tell you, every animal has their own special personality which transforms them into more than just an animal- they’re a companion.And thanks to the power of the internet, pet lovers from all around the world can submit photos of their faithful companions to Knecht using the really simple and very detailed instructions provided on her website.So go ahead and snap away without shame.Leah Knecht and Classic Pet Portraits can be reached at (626) 644-8081, and [email protected] For more information on how to commission a portrait, please visit www.classicpetportraits.com. Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Visual Arts Bringing Your Pet to Life Pasadena artist creates a lifetime of memories By EDDIE RIVERA, Editor, Living Section Published on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 | 6:34 am More Cool Stuff Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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9 May
2021

Multi-year observations on the gametogenic ecology of the Antarctic seastar Odontaster validus

first_imgThis study reports the first multi-year observations on the reproductive patterns for an Antarctic predator/scavenger, Odontaster validus (Koehler 1912). Seastars were collected monthly from a shallow site (15–20 m depth) near the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Rothera Research Station (Adelaide Island, 67°34′S 68°08′W) from July 1997 to January 2001. Reproductive condition, oocyte size frequencies and spermatogenesis were examined in at least ten seastars each month using histological and image analysis techniques. Gonad indices (GI) and pyloric caeca indices (PI) were also examined in the same samples. Female and male GIs varied seasonally, in parallel with a reduction in the proportion of large oocytes and mature sperm in the gonad in August to mid-October following winter spawning. Despite there being remarkable consistency in the timing of spawning from year to year, differences in the reproductive condition of individuals were apparent. Patterns in the digestive tissues also varied with season, peaking in December and reaching a minimum in February in two of the three study years. This weaker annual pattern may partly reflect the varied diet of this predator/scavenger species, which is not directly dependant on the timing and magnitude of the annual phytoplankton bloom. Pooled oocyte size distributions and residual analysis suggested that oogenesis progressed over 18–24 months, with the largest of the two size classes (maximum diameter = 183 μm) being spawned annually. This pattern of oocyte growth and spawning was previously reported in the early 1960s for an O. validus population from McMurdo Sound, which lies south of Rothera by 10° latitude. The extremely catholic diet of this predator/scavenger suggests the reproductive patterns of the seastar will be less susceptible to changes in food supply compared to polar suspension feeders or deposit feeders.last_img read more

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