4 Jun
2021

Gardaí criticised over investigation of teenager’s death

first_imgNo vaccines in Limerick yet by Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected] family of a 16-year-old girl who was found submerged at the canal entrance to the Abbey river have accused Gardaí of not fully investigating the circumstances leading up to her deathCity coroner John McNamara had to call order to proceedings on a number of occasions when family members disrupted the inquest with questions and comments directed at gardai.The 16 year old girl, who was described as “level headed” and in good form, was last seen by her sister shortly after 11pm on the night before her body was discovered in the water by a passerby.Garda John O’Connell told the inquest there was no evidence that a minor assault on the girl earlier that night was linked to her death.At this point, the girl’s sister and brother asked why no other depositions were given as they were key to the circumstances on the night and could answer questions the family had about the girl’s death.The teenager was seen running from the High Street area of the city towards Denmark Street after her sister attempted to get her into a car to take her home.The family claimed that she was in the company of others when she ran from her sister.There were heated exchanges as family members told gardaí to tell the truth, claiming that they should have “further investigated” the circumstances and that there was a more sinister background to the girl’s death.Medical evidence indicated toxic levels of alcohol along therapeutic levels of diazepam and alprazolam. According to the pathology report, death was due to drowning.The coroner said that while he accepted that the girl did not have suicidal thoughts and there was no evidence of foul play, an open verdict would be the most appropriate one.One of the girl’s sisters responded: “Ye just want to open and shut this case so that it goes away – the questions will never go away for us”.Her mother said that “kids go to the canal for a drink, we all know that – they don’t go there to jump in the river. She was a happy girl and had the world in front of her. She didn’t know what she was doing but my daughter didn’t jump, I believe she was pushed.”Asked by Mr McNamara if there were any other lines of inquiry both Inspector Seamus Ruane and Garda John O’Connell said that the investigation had concluded and there was no other evidence.“Nobody saw her fall in. Nobody saw her jump in or nobody saw her being pushed so this inquest must return an open verdict”, the coroner said. Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL First Irish death from Coronavirus Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email TAGSfeaturedfull-image WhatsAppcenter_img Advertisement Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Linkedin NewsGardaí criticised over investigation of teenager’s deathBy Staff Reporter – November 14, 2013 616 Print Previous articleLimerick is ready to shuffle to Bombay Bicycle ClubNext articleMinister opens Red Door Business incubation centre Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Facebooklast_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

Dundon set to walk free

first_imgNo vaccines in Limerick yet Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Advertisement #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Previous articleBasketball Ireland weekend PreviewNext articleLimerick call-out for Good Samaritans admin Twitter Email Linkedin by Andrew Carey | [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up GER Dundon is due to walk free from prison on Monday after serving three years of a five year sentence, but the landscape of the Limerick underworld will be very different from the city he terrorised for most of a decade.In February 2011, he was sent to jail after pleading guilty to violent disorder and, as the once-feared McCarthy/Dundon family lost its grip on the Limerick criminal scene, he was badly beaten up in two separate prison attacks.The mother of his three children, April Collins, gave evidence that led to the conviction of his brothers John and Wayne for threatening to kill her and her mother. She also testified in the case that led to John Dundon’s conviction for the murder of Garryowen rugby player Shane Geoghegan.Wayne Dundon is currently on remand for the murder of businessman Roy Collins.April Collins left Ger Dundon and formed a relationship with gang rapist Thomas O’Neill, but it ended when he was jailed for a mugging.Another brother, Dessie, is serving a life sentence for the murder of Limerick gang boss Kieran Keane and his sister Annabel is on the run from gardaí in the UK for allegedly threatening to kill April Collins in 2011.While in prison, the McCarthy/Dundon gang was involved in an internal dispute which resulted in the Collins family, including April’s father and brother, splitting from the faction.Ger Dundon was hospitalised after being involved in a mass brawl and on another occasion after convicted killer and rapist Ian Horgan attacked him for threatening Thomas O’Neill’s sister, with whom he is involved in a relationship.Through what Chief Superintendent Dave Sheahan described as “targeted up front policing”, Limerick Gardaí have increased their control of the city streets.Last September, Ger Dundon failed in his bid to appeal against the severity of the sentence handed down by the Special Criminal Court.During his appeal hearing, lawyers argued that the 27 year-old who has 99 previous court convictions, knows that “there is no future for him in Limerick”.center_img TAGSApril CollinsfeaturedGerard DundonJohn DundonMusic LimerickShane GeogheganWayne Dundon Print RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsCrime & CourtDundon set to walk freeBy admin – January 16, 2014 2270 Facebook WhatsApp Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boylast_img read more

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20 Nov
2020

Alicia Keys Explains Why She Stopped Wearing Makeup

first_imgShe continued that wearing braids even still makes her feel like royalty. “There’s something so beautiful about the Blackness of it, about my African ancestry that I just feel truly connected to.”Listen on Spotify to Get Tressed With Us to get the details of every hair love affair in Hollywood, from the hits and misses on the red carpet to your favorite celebrities’ street style ‘dos (and don’ts!) Alicia Keys on Why She Stopped Wearing Makeup: 'I Became Addicted to It'“Make-up was a big thing for me; I had been wearing it since I was, like, 16 years old,” she said in the autumn/winter 2020 Glamour U.K. issue. “And then, as I got into the music world, it was what you did every day to do your television, or to do your shoot.” She began wearing makeup, not out of pleasure, but because she thought that’s what she had to do.“I realized I became addicted to it,” she explained. “I didn’t feel comfortable without it.”- Advertisement – With that being said, the hitmaker has always known how to uphold her individual sense of identity. “The pressure to try to [get me to] wear more dressy things… that just wasn’t who I was and it will never be who I am,” she told the publication. “And even as I grow now, and can truly feel comfortable in multiple ways and styles, I still am who I am. So, I was happy that I was pretty strong from the beginning. And my management early on was always very supportive about that.”Another thing she’s maintained a strong attachment to is braids, thanks to the hairstyle’s cultural connection.“Hair is such a gorgeous expression of our individuality and deserves to be respected,” she said. “I’ve always been proud of wearing braids and I love learning about the power of hair.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Alicia Keys on Why She Stopped Wearing Makeup: 'I Became Addicted to It'Alicia Keys. Matt Baron/ShutterstockOur no makeup queen! It’s no secret that Alicia Keys is a fresh-faced goddess, but there’s a reason the 39-year-old gave up wearing makeup a few years ago.Back in 2016, the “Girl on Fire” singer famously launched a #NoMakeup campaign to protest the judgement women face every day over their appearance. But it wasn’t just about fighting the good fight. There were also some personal protests behind her decision.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

Student Talk Back focuses on poverty

first_imgOn Wednesday afternoon, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Science’s Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics hosted the semester’s second installment of “Students Talk Back: A Politics and Public Policy Forum” in partnership with the USC College Democrats, USC College Republicans and the Daily Trojan.The theme for the week’s discussion was, “War on Poverty: 50 Years and Fighting.” The talk was moderated by Burke Gibson, chief copy editor of the Daily Trojan, and Kerstyn Olson, interim director of the Unruh Institute.Panelists included Reed Galen, owner of Jedburghs, LLC and a former adjunct professor at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism; Angelica Solis, director of community development for the Youth Policy Institute and students Christian Patterson, a member of the USC College Democrats and Giuseppe Robalino, the director of Political Affairs and Strategy for the College Republicans.The discussion began with the current state of the War on Poverty in Los Angeles, a city recently named one of five “Promise Zones” by President Barack Obama, implementing a program he outlined in the 2013 State of the Union Address.Solis, however, said Los Angeles is not guaranteed any funding just because it was named a Promise Zone.“There actually aren’t any funds attached to the Promise Zones,” she said. “The distinction to be very clear about is it is a designation — it provides [for] the city of L.A. to apply for competitive federal funding.”The panelists then tackled the effectiveness of the War on Poverty as a whole. For Galen, who was a deputy campaign manager for the 2008 presidential campaign of John McCain, the true measure of the War on Poverty’s success is not the idea behind it, but how that idea is implemented.“The biggest failure is how many folks we have that live consistently below the poverty line and the intergenerational impact of that,” he said. “If there is an indictment, it is not the ideals behind it, it is the execution.”Patterson agreed and spoke of the immense benefits that federal programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps) and the Earned Income Tax Credit have had on families struggling to climb out of poverty.Before opening the floor to questions from the audience, Olson asked the panel for comments on how democrats and republicans can compromise on the issue.“Republicans must get over being indifferent to the plight of folks who live below the poverty line and being cavalier to the fact that people might starve the death,” Galen said. “If we’re going be the party of opportunity, we should be the party of opportunity for everybody — not [just] white families in the suburbs.”Robalino agreed with Galen’s sentiments.“This is an issue the Republican Party can come to own,” he said. “It hearkens back to Horatio Alger’s ideas on coming from rags to riches.”Patterson, however, did not believe the Republican Party cared about the War on Poverty based on recent legislation the party has fought for.“We should not think of the war on poverty as a Democrat issue or a Republican issue,” Patterson said. “I don’t think the Republican stance on the War on Poverty will be a hard pill to swallow for many people, given that the House just fought for months and months to cut $40 billion from food stamps.”Students in attendance spoke of the importance of hearing the conversation from the viewpoint of students as well as professionals.“It’s nice to hear both perspectives, people that are working in the field that we’re talking about and students that are politically involved coming from a different point of view in the classroom,” said Jennifer    Ann-Massey, president of the USC College Republicans.Olson emphasized the ability of “Talk Backs” to showcase different opinions and views.“I hope that they are provided a broad perspective,” Olson said. “Not just ideologically, but considering all of the social factors that contribute to poverty and thinking outside of their political leanings about how the other side has made attempts to or has been successful in preventing poverty in their districts.”The next “Students Talk Back” is Feb. 26, and will cover California’s historic drought.last_img read more

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