4 Jun
2021

HSE Mid West Community Healthcare and UL Hospitals Group urges public…

first_imgLinkedin Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener NewsHealthLimerickHSE Mid West Community Healthcare and UL Hospitals Group urges public to avoid household visits and social gatherings for St Patrick’s DayBy Staff Reporter – March 17, 2021 84 Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads TAGSHSE Mid WestKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostSt Patrick’s Day Facebook Previous articleCJ Stander: A Hero For A GenerationNext articleRECAP: 2021 Cheltenham Festival kicks off in style Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Print WhatsApp Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Email Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live THE Department of Public Health Mid-West, HSE Mid West Community Healthcare, and UL Hospitals Group are strongly urging people in Limerick, Clare, and North Tipperary to avoid any form of social gathering this St Patrick’s Day, as we continue to manage a high rate of multi-household outbreaks as a result of social mixing. Public Health Mid-West is currently investigating more than 55* household situations, involving at least two cases each, across the Mid-West region since March 1. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up  These “situations” are in households where a more in-depth Public Health risk assessment has been undertaken because of either having a suspected or confirmed outbreak. Appended to this statement is a visual example of a complex community outbreak of more than 20 cases, occurring as a direct result of social mixing among multiple households, which occurred in the Mid-West region in recent months. Each household was exposed to other settings, including workplaces and extended families, resulting in further spread of infection outside the household. One household cluster was linked to a workplace outbreak of more than five cases, which then spread to the household of a staff member, resulting in a family outbreak. Dr Mai Mannix, Director of Public Health Mid-West, said: “Many will feel that a once-off social visit to a friend or family member might be harmless, but if small gatherings occur on a regional scale across a number of communities, this could be the start of another serious community outbreak. “The people of Limerick, Clare and North Tipperary have shown great resolve in suppressing the virus after a challenging two months that resulted in significant levels of illness and death. We owe it to our most vulnerable to continue following the Public Health guidelines, so we can give them a chance to be vaccinated.” HSE Mid-West Community Healthcare Chief Officer, Maria Bridgeman said:“Concurring with my colleagues in public health and the acute hospitals, it is vital we adhere to Public Health advice this St Patrick’s Day. It’s really important that we all stay local, celebrate virtually, do not travel around the country and do not mix households. “The efforts we have all made are making an impact as we see infection rates drop. Combined with the roll out of the vaccination programme it gives us reason to be hopeful as we approach St Patrick’s Day and head into Easter, but it remains vital the public continue to play their part to save lives. Please keep a distance of two metres between you and anyone outside of your household; wash your hands regularly and wear a face mask to help reduce the spread of Covid-19.” UL Hospitals Group CEO Colette Cowan stated: “It’s important for the people of the Mid-West to hold firm to the public health guidance that has helped to hold back the spread of COVID-19 in our communities over the past two months.” “We ask the people of the Mid-West to celebrate St Patrick’s Day without any one-off visits to friends or family this year. It’s a big ask for people who have already given so much, but we have to continue doing everything we can to prevent another COVID surge of the kind that resulted in such significant illness, hospitalisations and death this January and February,” Ms Cowan said. Advertisement Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

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16 Dec
2020

‘Cool Downtowns’ Won’t Cut It If Long Island’s Millennials Can’t Afford to Live, Work and Play Here

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York All too often when the subject is Long Island’s millennial population, the topic is only addressed rhetorically at best: “What do Millennials Want?” “Why Are Millennials Different?” Or, tellingly, “Where Will Millennials Live?”These questions are genuine but the discourse never draws any significant conclusion.Policymakers, stakeholders and developers need to realize that millennials here—and across the country—want what every generation that came before them has wanted: decent housing at a fair price, and a good paying job. Not much mystery there, yet our region continually struggles with these issues.Throw into the mix the ever-ominous phrase “Brain Drain,” and what you get are buzzwords and inertia. The Brain Drain, a topic which I’ve written on at length, is a multifaceted excuse for developers, policymakers and whoever else is itching to put a shovel in the ground, to justify their projects.A quick look into the actual population statistics reveals the fact that LI is experiencing a “birth dearth,” a natural cycle that highlights lower birth rates. Further research also yields another interesting trend—seemingly every area is experiencing a “brain drain” of some kind. The pressing question that none of these policymakers or stakeholders ask is: if every county, town and village is experiencing a brain drain, where, exactly, are these young people winding up?Since I’ve started writing on the topic (and will continue to do so!), the narrative on the Island is starting to recognize the birth dearth theory, which was popularized locally by progressive planners such as Seth Forman.Recently, Amanda Fiscina, a former classmate of mine at Fordham University, wrote a compelling column for Newsday entitled “Where Should 20-Somethings on Long Island Live?”  By focusing on actions that can be taken like approving mixed-use zoning and supplying more apartments and co-ops, she offered a fresh take on topics that have been beaten to death by vested interests.LI’s millennials, often the focal point of development strategies from both local government and private enterprise, need more affordable options. Instead of merely arguing for “cool downtowns” as so many think pieces on the subject tend to do, Fiscina argues for smart incentives to promote greater diversity of housing stock and suggests realistic means for millennials to build equity while remaining in the region.Time and time again, policymakers, and the nonprofits, developers and the stakeholders who local leaders task with addressing this supposedly critical issue all say the same thing. If you build it, they will come—“cool downtowns” with restaurants, rooftop bars, bus-rapid transit and so on—with little to no consideration on how, exactly, the millennials who are being targeted with these “destinations” will be able to frequent those places being built. Millennials on Long Island need decent job opportunities, not organic spas that they can barely afford.Fiscina hit a nerve when she wrote: “The lack of housing choices is pushing millennials off the Island or to move in with their families. It’s time to stop judging when we pick those two options if Long Island won’t build what we need.”She’s right—we’re not building what millennials really need. Our regional economy must be diversified. Retail expansion is what passes for economic development, but few millennials loaded down with student loan debt can support a “cool” lifestyle on LI on retail wages alone. It’s time to adapt the Island’s suburbia to the employment trends and economic demands of the 21st century.As our hospitality and retail industries swell, other occupations offering higher salaries and better opportunities for educated residents continue either to decline, as is the case of local manufacturing, or struggle to establish a foothold in the Nassau-Suffolk region. Our current transit-oriented boom is rooted in sound planning principles, but the region must go further. It is one thing to build rental housing, but if it isn’t affordable for the supposed target audience, then what good is it?Fortunately, there is hope. Efforts to incubate new technology firms from non-profit groups such as Accelerate Long Island and LaunchPad Huntington, and a renewed focus by the Rauch Foundation to help coordinate the Island’s prestigious research institutions may attract attention from the right business sectors and lead to job creation. Let’s take it to the next level by synchronizing the approach of local Industrial Development Agencies to accompany the endeavors of the Long Island Association. If LI’s municipalities no longer have to compete with one another, our region will be free to stave off bigger threats from other states.As a result, millennials may finally get the creative solutions to the complex problems vexing them here today.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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19 Sep
2020

Uitvlugt Warriors beat Den Amstel to win NSC/WDFA Arthur Chung memorial tourney

first_img… Eagles edge Pouderoyen 3-2 to finish thirdUITVLUGT Warriors defeated Den Amstel 2-0 in a penalty shoot-out to win the National Sports Commission/West Demerara Football Association’s Arthur Chung Memorial football tournament which was played at the National Track and Field facility at Leonora, West Coast Demerara last Sunday.The two teams were locked 1-1 at the end of regulation time and the winner had to be decided by a penalty shoot that saw Uitvlugt Warriors convert two of their four shots while the team’s custodian, Kelvis Mitchell, saved all four of Den Amstel’s shots from the spot.Earlier in the game, Daniel Forde gave Uitvlugt the lead with a 15th minute goal but 17 minutes later, Den Amstel secured the equaliser through Andre Hector who converted in the 32nd minute.The win for Uitvlugt earned them $100 000, while Den Amstel pocketed $50 000.In the third place playoff of the one-day four-team tournament, Eagles edged Pouderoyen 3-2, with goals off the boots of Adrian Adelph, Chris Macey and M. Ezequiel in the 38th, 58th and 60th minutes respectively.Amaniki Buntin (15th) and Lexroy Mansfield (47th) were the goalscorers for Pouderoyen.Eagles earned $30 000 while Pouderoyen were awarded with $20 000.Meanwhile, in the two semi-final matches, Uitvlugt defeated Eagles 3-1 and Den Amstel edged Pouderoyen 1-0.For Uitvlugt, Harvey recorded a double in the 28th and 30th minutes, while David Floyd netted in the 29th minute.Marvis Williams scored in the 39th minute for Eagles in the other semi-final while Den Amstel’s Gavin Graham’s 24th minute goal was enough to send his team to the final.Mitchell was adjudged the Most Valuable Player-of-the-tournament as well as the Best Goalkeeper.Harvey and Floyd were adjudged joint winners of the Highest Goals Scorer award.last_img read more

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