12 Jun
2021

Opinion: The Subtle Effects of The Mack Robinson Processing Facility Closure

first_img More Cool Stuff 16 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Recently the Mack Robinson Processing Facility closed without fanfare. This closing affects some 125+ employees, their families, and the community as a whole. Employees have been dispersed to other facilities around the greater Los Angeles area. These dispersals could be permanent, temporary, or end up in lay-offs. Families face the possibility of being uprooted and the uncertainty of unemployment.But it isn’t just the employees and their families that are affected. It is the entire Pasadena community. Mail faces delivery delays of 2-4 days because it now has to go to a facility further away. Prescriptions, social security checks, small business mailings, and parcels from online businesses like eBay and Amazon will be affected. Want to send a package or buy stamps? Well, if your station has closed, you have to find one elsewhere. We have already seen the closure of the Washington and Raymond Annex stations. Orangewood could be next. San Marino and Sierra Madre – your stations could be shut down as well.Some people will say that this is the Post Office’s own fault. But most of the current problems can be traced to Congress passing the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) in 2006. PAEA forced the Post Office to have to pre-fund healthcare benefits for future retirees for the next 75 years all within a decade. No other public agency or private business has had to carry this type of burden.And it doesn’t end there, if members of Congress, like Rep. Darrell Issa, and Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe have their way, more stations will be closed. They are trying to pass H.R. 2309 which will destroy the Post Office. Call your Representative and tell them to vote against H.R. 2309. Visit www.savethepostoffice.com to learn more. It is vital to the Post Office’s existence. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment HerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA 74 Year Old Fitness Enthusiast Defies All Concept Of AgeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeauty Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News center_img Community News Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Opinion & Columnists Opinion: The Subtle Effects of The Mack Robinson Processing Facility Closure By: Tim Nistler Published on Monday, July 16, 2012 | 2:04 pmlast_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

Wood burning stoves put thatched homes at risk

first_img TAGSfireLimerick City and County CouncilTom Cassidytraditional thatched cottages Call to extend Patrickswell public sewer line Advertisement WhatsApp Facebook New parklet changes Catherine Street dining experience Email Previous articleComptroller and Auditor General’s office to report on UL auditNext articleWin cinema tickets Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsLocal NewsWood burning stoves put thatched homes at riskBy Bernie English – February 24, 2018 2266 Printcenter_img Linkedin Limerick’s O’Connell Street Revitalisation Works to go ahead Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Thatched cottage The owners of traditional thatched cottages who install wood-burning stoves are running a serious risk of having a house fire.That was the message from the Conservation Officer of Limerick City and County Council this week, when he told a meeting of elected members of the council that a number of the county’s thatched cottages had been lost to fire.Conservation Officer, Tom Cassidy was addressing a request to members of the KIlmallock and Cappamore district of the council to remove a listed thatch cottage from the record of protected structures.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He told the meeting that ten buildings have been lost lost to fires from the protected structures record in Limerick in the last five years.“In many cases, the fires can be attributed to wood-burning stoves being installed. The problem is that in Ireland, we’re not very good at seasoning our wood for two years,” Mr Cassidy told the meeting.“Wood that hasn’t been properly seasoned still contains sap and this adheres to the inside of the flues and catches fire. A wind lifts the material and the thatch goes up.“This happens around two years after a wood burning stove has been installed,” he explained.Mr Cassidy said that the high heat generated by burning wood in a stove can contribute to the hazard.“People should be aware that installing a wood-burning stove in a protected structure requires planning permission. There’s a reason we require people to do these things. Installing a wood burning stove can be the death-knell of a thatched house,” he told the meeting.Asked whether it was possible to control such modifications, Mr Cassidy said his department “does not have enough staff to go around knocking on doors and asking people if they have installed a wood stove”.He told members of the area committee that there are currently more than 200 thatched cottages in county Limerick.More local news here. Ireland’s First Ever Virtual Bat Walk to take place in Limerick Limerick city centre gets a deep clean O’Donnell Welcomes Major Enhancement Works for Castletroy Neighbourhood Park last_img read more

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12 May
2021

A seat on the board

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Beingappoin`ted a non-executive director to the right company can be a shrewd careerdevelopment move but as Rob McLuhan discovers HR professionals, who often lackactual board experience, may need to work harder than most to be askedAnon-executive directorship used to be thought of as a perk for retiring Citychairmen or a bolthole for sacked Tory cabinet ministers. These days it isregarded as a serious job, and one that any senior professional can aspire toas a means to broaden his or her horizons.Lookaround at the shambles that some companies seem to create and it is quicklyapparent that non-executive directors have an important monitoring role toplay. Their impartial advice can help avoid causing public outrage withill-advised bonuses to directors (Marks & Spencer), actions that threatenthe environment (Shell with Brent Spar), or disastrous negligence (BaringsBank).Itis to help steer clear of these pitfalls that Stock Exchange regulations insistupon an objective presence on the board for publicly quoted companies. This isalso recommended by the Combined Code of corporate governance commissionscarried out during the last decade, which urges that no less than a third ofthe board should consist of non-executives.TheInstitute of Directors says companies – both listed and unlisted – arevoluntarily exceeding this level to around 40 per cent, while the number ofcompanies with non-executive directors has increased to 60 per cent.Asurvey by the Reward Group shows average earnings by a non-executive directorrunning at around £160 a day, and specialist recruiters say the job can bringin £15-25,000 a year – more in large organisations. In the US there is a trendto pay with share options rather than a flat fee, although that practice hasattracted controversy in the UK as likely to put objectivity at risk.Atfirst sight this looks like money for jam. A non-executive director is expectedmainly to show up for board meetings, which are typically held once a month –fewer in some companies. But a closer look shows the position can actually bequite onerous.”It’sa difficult role to perform,” says Daniel Summerfield, corporategovernance executive at the Institute of Directors. “Non-executivedirectors have to maintain distance from the organisation because they arebringing a wider perspective, but they have also to keep their finger on thepulse.”Thatmeans getting to know the issues, keeping up with the minutes of boardmeetings, chairing committees, and perhaps hobnobbing with important clients.All these activities can seriously cut into regular job hours, which is whymost working professionals would not normally hold more than one such positionat a time. Another potential drawback is the responsibility: under law the non-executiveteam is held equally liable for any criminal or negligent activity.Thornyissues that could engage a non-executive director might be how to handle a bidfor the company that goes against the personal interests of the directors, or aboard appointment that is not working out, as well as disagreements to do withboard succession and remuneration.Butnon-executive directors can also help set strategy, particularly if they haverelevant experience. They may be valued for their City, institutional or evengovernment contacts. And they may have an understanding of issues that relateto changes that a company is going through, for instance globalisation or theimplementation of major new IT systems.”Wesay to clients that we will try to find someone who has experienced what theyare going through,” says Patrick Dunne, director of venture capitalcompany 3i. “That particularly applies to start-up companies, when thereal world intervenes and they have to adapt.”Experienceof HR can be useful to a company that is involved in recruitment issues such asInternet jobsite StepStone (see box). However, this is relatively unusual.Hanson Green, which specialises in the hiring of non-executive directors, saysthere is not much demand from large listed organisations for HR professionals,although it does make placements in smaller companies.”Thedifficulty is that clients want someone with an operational background,”says Hanson Green director David Treadwell. “I personally believe HRpeople are equally well qualified as managing, marketing or finance directors,but many companies perceive that this is not the case.”Boardmembership is usually a prerequisite for large listed organisations, and hereagain HR professionals are likely to be at a disadvantage since so few haveattained this. However,those who have general managerial experience outside the function could beattractive to smaller companies.Akey job for non-executive directors is to chair the remuneration, nominationand audit committees, and the first two at least have a special relevance toHR. Remuneration can be particularly sensitive, given the public scorn acompany can attract if its payment of directors is seen to be excessive.Thejob also requires a particular set of personal qualities. Treadwell says,”The people we approach are senior, established in their roles, and havethe technical skills. They understand how boards work, and are financiallyliterate.””Butthey also have to have skills you can’t teach – tact, a sense of humour, andthe ability to influence without commanding, and if these are absent they areunlikely to succeed in the role.” Some managing directors make poornon-executive directors because they can’t stop taking control, he adds.Andthey should be ruthless where the occasion demands. When the chairman and chiefexecutive of Cable & Wireless were at loggerheads a few years ago, thenon-executive team stepped in and removed them both. Assumingit is possible to acquire a non-executive directorship, the benefits in terms ofpersonal development are generally acknowledged.”Itcould have important advantages for a person’s career, improving theircredibility and raising their profile,” says John Stork, managing partnerof Stork & May, career strategy consultants for senior executives.”Also, it widens their contacts and gives them more options were they toleave that job.”Themoney is not good enough to be a motivation, says 3i’s Dunne, except for thosewho get involved in an entrepreneurial venture with potentially lucrative shareoptions. However, personal development would be a good reason for taking it on,he agrees.”Alternatively,you might want to do it just for the fun of it, as an interesting andchallenging to do,” he suggests.Butgiven the difficulties HR professionals have getting onto the board of theirown companies, should one even consider trying for a non-executive positionsomewhere else? Absolutely,says Dunne. “If you are with a well recognised high-performing company,it’s not unrealistic, as long as you are absolutely clear why you want to do itand what you can contribute.”Asto acquiring a position, some people may be approached by headhunters whileothers will themselves initiate the process by sending their CV to a specialistrecruitment agency. But at this level it is word-of-mouth that often bringsresults. “Mostpeople get appointed through their networks they have or build,” saysDunne. “If you really want to do this and start talking to people, youwill probably get there. Then once you have experience, other opportunitieswill quickly arise.”Rolecan offer great career development opportunitiesLesleyJames former HR director, Tesco. Non-executive directorships: Selfridges, Care UK, West Bromwich Building Society,DTI Insolvency Service Steering Board.”IfI had not been on the board of Tesco I don’t believe I would have been soughtout to join Selfridges as a non-executive. Having got that appointment I wasapproached by Care UK, which provides residential homes for the elderly, andWest Bromwich Building Society.”Thecontribution I make comes less from my understanding of HR than from my generalbusiness experience. In Tesco the job was about changing culture, expansion,and mergers and acquisitions, and Selfridges was going through a demerger whenI joined.”Carewas interested in my background in a leading service company. The same is trueof West Bromwich, it is keen to provide fantastic customer service, and wherebetter to go for insights than someone from Tesco? With the DTI the need wasfor an understanding of how the private sector operates.”Ialso chair the staff policy committee of the Open University, am a trustee of achildren’s charity, and sit on a DTI advisory panel on partnership funding. Theseare unpaid non-executive roles and are as good a development opportunity for HRprofessionals to consider as anything.”MichaelMaher, former group HR director of food company Dalgety, now chairman of printand packaging specialist Jarvis Porter. Until recently he held non-executive directorships with StepStone.com,Motivano.com, and Jarvis Porter.”Mostcompanies will look for other skills besides HR in their non-executivedirectors. I have spent eight of the last 20 years in general management. StepStonesaw itself as unique in having an HR professional on its board. However, I wasnot there to give internal HR advice, but for my understanding of therecruitment and corporate market.”HRprofessionals on executive committees tend to think of themselves as beingthere to do an HR job. I believe that’s the complete opposite of what’s needed,and is why they don’t get on the board of public companies that frequently.It’s not about being an excellent HR technician, but being a good generalmanager, and applying intellect across a wide area of responsibility.”Mymain responsibility in both StepStone and Jarvis Porter was as chairman of theremuneration committee. I was eventually appointed executive chairman of JarvisPorter, which meant giving up my non-executive roles. As chairman I haveappointed two non-executives into Jarvis Porter in the last 12 months. I havelooked for people with complementary skills, recruiting one with an excellentsales and marketing background and another with experience of mergers andacquisitions.” Comments are closed. A seat on the boardOn 12 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img
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