14 Jun
2021

EPA Regional Administrator Visits Indiana, Highlights $3.8 Million to Improve Water…

first_img EPA Regional Administrator Visits Indiana, Highlights $3.8 Million to Improve Water Quality and Protect Watersheds SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Sep 3, 2020 Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News EPA Regional Administrator Visits Indiana, Highlights $3.8 Million to Improve Water Quality… U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Kurt Thiede concluded a trip to Indiana Thursday with the announcement of a $3,777,000 Clean Water Act Section 319 grant to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) to improve the health of watersheds throughout the state. He also toured Wallpe Farms in Fowler to see operations to conserve water quality and promote soil health.“The great work being done to reduce nonpoint source pollution in the Big Pine Creek Watershed and throughout the state of Indiana is an example of the importance of continued collaboration with the agricultural community,” said Regional Administrator Kurt Thiede. “Through discussions like we had today with farmers and stakeholders, and meaningful actions, we will continue to make an even greater impact in protecting and restoring water quality in Indiana.”During the visit, Thiede participated in a roundtable discussion with the Indiana Farm Bureau and local farmers on best management practices, research, and implementation efforts to reduce nonpoint source runoff. He highlighted how the new funding will help reduce nonpoint source pollution across Indiana.“IDEM is glad to have the support of the EPA in protecting Indiana’s waterways,” said IDEM Assistant Commissioner, Office of Water Quality Martha Clark Mettler. “The 319 grant program provides important funding to safeguard our natural resources and improve water quality for all Hoosiers.”IDEM uses the funding to implement its nonpoint source management plan which includes awarding grants to local sponsors for projects to address urban and rural runoff that impairs water quality in priority watersheds throughout the state.“Section 319 Grants and the types of partnerships we’ve seen here today are important to implementing and developing new and innovative approaches to on-farm conservation practices,” said Randy Kron, Indiana Farm Bureau President. “INFB is a proud partner in ensuing that agriculture continues to do its part in protecting water quality in our rural communities.”Under this program, for FY2020 IDEM selected nine proposals that will focus on improving watersheds affected by nonpoint source pollution:Big Pine Creek Watershed Implementation Project – sponsored by the Benton County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD)Deer Creek-Sugar Creek Implementation Project – sponsored by the Carroll County SWCDHighland Pigeon Watershed Management Plan Development – Gibson County SWCDOnsite Sewage Disposal System Outreach and Education Project – sponsored by the Indiana Lake Michigan Coastal ProgramOtter Creek Watershed Implementation – sponsored by the Ouabache Land ConservancyMaria and No Business Creek Planning and Implementation Project – sponsored by the Sullivan County SWCDSouth Fork Blue River Watershed Project – Washington County SWCDRegion of the Great Bend of the Wabash River Implementation Project – Wabash River Enhancement CorporationWalnut Creek-Tippecanoe River Watershed Implementation Project – sponsored by the Watershed FoundationThe visit highlighted work being done in the Big Pine Creek Watershed where a growing interest to improve soil health through nutrient management has led to a voluntary partnership with farmers and landowners. The work includes studies in Benton and Warren County to measure the amount of nitrate runoff in local ditches, streams and watersheds.  Several area farmers and landowners are voluntarily taking part in nitrate runoff practices to increase yield and improve soil health, while reducing input costs. The Big Pine Creek Watershed groups received Section 319 funding in FY2016 to implement this program and will receive FY2020 funds to continue with implementation.IDEM expects this year’s 319 grant projects will reduce an estimated 86,000 tons of sediment, 100,000 lbs of phosphorous and 196,000 lbs of nitrogen as a result of on-the-ground best management practice in priority watersheds.Unlike pollution from industrial facilities and sewage treatment plants, nonpoint source pollution does not come from a specific place. As precipitation moves over or through the ground, it picks up debris and pollutants and deposits them into lakes, rivers, wetlands, coastal waters and groundwater. Nonpoint source pollution can include excess fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides; oil, grease, and toxic chemicals from urban runoff; sediment; drainage from abandoned mines; and bacteria and nutrients from livestock, pet waste, and faulty septic systems. It can contribute to problems like harmful algal blooms, erosion, and bacteria contamination of surface and groundwater.For more information regarding EPA’s nonpoint source grant program visit: https://www.epa.gov/nps/319-grant-program-states-and-territoriesSource: EPA Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleEthanol Production Leveling, Down 13% From Pre-COVID LevelsNext articleSafety Tips for the Grill This Holiday Weekend Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

A prize of a weekend

first_img Related Rehearsing “Cuchifrito” by Carlos Henriquez for @niemanfdn #Pulitzer100 celebration at @Harvard pic.twitter.com/KZQYgm3IbV— Wynton Marsalis (@wyntonmarsalis) September 8, 2016 Luminaries from the worlds of journalism, photography, history, and music gathered over the weekend at Harvard to mark the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize, in festivities hosted by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.Jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis, who won the 1997 Pulitzer for his work “Blood on the Fields,” opened the celebration Saturday evening at Sanders Theatre with a performance by his quintet, following an introduction by Harvard President Drew Faust. (Watch a clip from his rehearsal below) Ahead of this weekend’s gathering, journalist Bob Woodward muses on the press, and sees plenty of hope Celebrating the Pulitzers at 100 On Sunday, in readings, conversations, and performances, past prize winners touched on the event’s theme of accountability and abuse of power.Among the speakers was investigative journalism titan Robert Caro, who wrote the masterwork “The Power Broker” about the extraordinary life of Robert Moses, an unelected city planner in New York who wielded more clout than any governor or mayor for more than 40 years. Caro also wrote the definitive multivolume biography about Lyndon B. Johnson, an ongoing project.Caro, a two-time Pulitzer winner, said the initial idea for “The Power Broker” came to him during an urban planning and land use class that he took while at Harvard as a Nieman Fellow in 1965–66. The course covered where and why highways get built, a seemingly mundane and tangential question for a political reporter.But the class led to Caro’s inquiry into Moses’ plan in the 1920s for a parkway across northern Long Island, a project that turned out to be a thread that would unravel a grim, hidden account of the “human cost” of Moses’ reign. The experience taught Caro a fundamental lesson about influence: “Regard for power implies disregard for those without power,” he said.“The story of the Northern State Parkway was not only the story of how Robert Moses dealt with the powerful; it was also the story of how Robert Moses dealt with those who had no power. In order to write about power truthfully, I decided, it was necessary to write not only about the man who wielded power, but the effect of power on those on whom it was wielded.”The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward, perhaps the most powerful and influential reporter of the last 50 years; Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras, who aided publication of information about the National Security Agency surveillance program leaked by Edward Snowden; and Dean Baquet, executive editor of The New York Times, engaged in lively debate about the quality of mainstream media coverage and the many missed questions in the run-up to the Iraq War that exposed both the “mundane” and “larger failures” of the press. They also disagreed about what history will say about the job the press has done identifying and explaining the transformation of power inside the U.S. government that has taken place since the 9/11 terror attacks.Citing stories that he said reporters need to hunt down vigorously, Woodward pointed to the “holes in our understanding” about presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, such as Trump’s still-unreleased tax returns and a cache of nearly 15,000 emails from Clinton’s time in the State Department that haven’t been made public.Baquet said he would argue in favor of publishing Trump’s tax returns if the press obtained them. Woodward said The Post would most certainly publish the returns if it gets them, even though it’s a federal crime, publishable by five years in prison, to do so. He joked that he agrees with Post colleague Kevin Sullivan that the tax returns are so essential to the public’s understanding of Trump that Post reporters should each “take a day” in jail.“Some things you have to do,” he said.In a videotaped interview with Nieman Curator Ann Marie Lipinski, “Hamilton” creator and performer Lin-Manuel Miranda discussed how the themes of both giving up and losing power are interwoven into his musical’s rich narrative. He also addressed the challenges he faces in his creative process, and in finding his artistic voice.In “One Last Time,” a song about how Alexander Hamilton wrote George Washington’s farewell address as he stepped down from office, Miranda sees contemporary parallels in the pursuit of power.“One of the trappings of power is that you become convinced that the problems of your country are uniquely yours to solve. That’s the rationalization,” he said. “And that’s how you get to dictatorship, and that’s how you get to despotism. That’s how you get to tyranny, and that’s how you get to a mayor’s third term.“You convince yourself that ‘I alone can solve these problems,’ when the faith needs to be in the institution itself.”last_img read more

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