23 Jun
2021

Old hands lead Ulster to Scarlets

first_imgTAGS: Ulster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 2. Ravenhill Park3. Ravenhill Park Gardens There will also be parking restrictions in place in the Castlereagh area (Mount Merrion Avenue). Supporters are encouraged to make use of the Park ‘n’ Ride facilities at Pirrie Park and along Montgomery Road. Your co-operation is gratefully appreciated.center_img Brian McLaughlin has named an experienced team to face the Scarlets in tomorrow night’s vital Magners League game at Ravenhill. BJ Botha and Ian Humphreys are drafted straight into the starting line up after spells out injured. Botha (elbow) has not featured since the Heineken Cup match against Biarritz in January, while Humphreys (hamstring) has not played since the end of February. Andrew Trimble also returns to the starting team after missing the last two games through injury but Stephen Ferris continues to be ruled out with a knee problem. Rory Best takes over the captaincy from Johann Muller on his return to the starting XV. He played 15 minutes against Glasgow last week after returning from 6 Nations duty and will start alongside Botha and Tom Court in an all-international front row. In the back row Willie Fallon gains a start at openside flank in place of Chris Henry who drops to the bench. The backline has also been re-shuffled as Ruan Pienaar moves back to scrum half to allow Humphreys to take the No10 jersey. Adam D’Arcy comes in at fullback as Simon Danielli moves to the wing and Craig Gilroy starts on the bench. The other wing berth is occupied by Trimble who has replaced 20 year old Conor Gaston. Ulster are on a run of five straight wins, with three of those coming courtesy of last-gasp kicks. The last time Ulster won six in a row they went on to win the league in 2005/06. They currently occupy third position in the table and will face a stern test against their fellow play-off contenders. A win tonight is not only important for their Magners League challenge but they will be hoping for victory and an improved performance ahead of next week’s Heineken Cup quarter final against Northampton. Ulster Team v Scarlets (Magners League, Ravenhill, Friday 1st April, kick-off 7.05pm) (15-9): A D’Arcy; A Trimble, N Spence, P Wallace, S Danielli; I Humphreys, R Pienaar;(1-8): T Court, R Best, BJ Botha, J Muller (capt), D Tuohy, R Diack, W Faloon, P Wannenburg;Replacements (16-23): A Kyriacou, P McAllister, D Fitzpatrick, T Barker, C Henry, P Marshall, I Whitten, C Gilroy. Ulster Rugby would advise supporters coming to the game (gates open 5.30pm) to avoid parking in the immediate vicinity of the Ravenhill Grounds and that the following roads are only accessible for residents and closed to everyone else: 1. Onslow Paradelast_img read more

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12 Jun
2021

Flowing Electrons Help Ocean Microbes Gulp Methane

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Science and Technology Flowing Electrons Help Ocean Microbes Gulp Methane By JESSICA STOLLER-CONRAD Published on Friday, September 18, 2015 | 11:20 am Electron microscopy (left), and nanoSIMS analyses (right) of slices of individual microbial consortia allowed for unambiguous identification and analysis of thousands of individual cells. nanoSIMS images such as this one give a quantitative picture of the isotopic composition of each cell, and in turn, a measure of each cell’s biosynthetic activity in relationship to each cell’s neighbors. Credit: Shawn McGlynn/CaltechGood communication is crucial to any relationship, especially when partners are separated by distance. This also holds true for microbes in the deep sea that need to work together to consume large amounts of methane released from vents on the ocean floor. Recent work at Caltech has shown that these microbial partners can still accomplish this task, even when not in direct contact with one another, by using electrons to share energy over long distances.This is the first time that direct interspecies electron transport—the movement of electrons from a cell, through the external environment, to another cell type—has been documented in microorganisms in nature.The results were published in the September 16 issue of the journal Nature.“Our lab is interested in microbial communities in the environment and, specifically, the symbiosis—or mutually beneficial relationship—between microorganisms that allows them to catalyze reactions they wouldn’t be able to do on their own,” says Professor of Geobiology Victoria Orphan, who led the recent study. For the last two decades, Orphan’s lab has focused on the relationship between a species of bacteria and a species of archaea that live in symbiotic aggregates, or consortia, within deep-sea methane seeps. The organisms work together in syntrophy (which means “feeding together”) to consume up to 80 percent of methane emitted from the ocean floor—methane that might otherwise end up contributing to climate change as a greenhouse gas in our atmosphere.Previously, Orphan and her colleagues contributed to the discovery of this microbial symbiosis, a cooperative partnership between methane-oxidizing archaea called anaerobic methanotrophs (or “methane eaters”) and a sulfate-reducing bacterium (organisms that can “breathe” sulfate instead of oxygen) that allows these organisms to consume methane using sulfate from seawater. However, it was unclear how these cells share energy and interact within the symbiosis to perform this task.Because these microorganisms grow slowly (reproducing only four times per year) and live in close contact with each other, it has been difficult for researchers to isolate them from the environment to grow them in the lab. So, the Caltech team used a research submersible, called Alvin, to collect samples containing the methane-oxidizing microbial consortia from deep-ocean methane seep sediments and then brought them back to the laboratory for analysis.The researchers used different fluorescent DNA stains to mark the two types of microbes and view their spatial orientation in consortia. In some consortia, Orphan and her colleagues found the bacterial and archaeal cells were well mixed, while in other consortia, cells of the same type were clustered into separate areas.Orphan and her team wondered if the variation in the spatial organization of the bacteria and archaea within these consortia influenced their cellular activity and their ability to cooperatively consume methane. To find out, they applied a stable isotope “tracer” to evaluate the metabolic activity. The amount of the isotope taken up by individual archaeal and bacterial cells within their microbial “neighborhoods” in each consortia was then measured with a high-resolution instrument called nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) at Caltech. This allowed the researchers to determine how active the archaeal and bacterial partners were relative to their distance to one another.To their surprise, the researchers found that the spatial arrangement of the cells in consortia had no influence on their activity. “Since this is a syntrophic relationship, we would have thought the cells at the interface—where the bacteria are directly contacting the archaea—would be more active, but we don’t really see an obvious trend. What is really notable is that there are cells that are many cell lengths away from their nearest partner that are still active,” Orphan says.To find out how the bacteria and archaea were partnering, co-first authors Grayson Chadwick (BS ’11), a graduate student in geobiology at Caltech and a former undergraduate researcher in Orphan’s lab, and Shawn McGlynn, a former postdoctoral scholar, employed spatial statistics to look for patterns in cellular activity for multiple consortia with different cell arrangements. They found that populations of syntrophic archaea and bacteria in consortia had similar levels of metabolic activity; when one population had high activity, the associated partner microorganisms were also equally active—consistent with a beneficial symbiosis. However, a close look at the spatial organization of the cells revealed that no particular arrangement of the two types of organisms—whether evenly dispersed or in separate groups—was correlated with a cell’s activity.To determine how these metabolic interactions were taking place even over relatively long distances, postdoctoral scholar and coauthor Chris Kempes, a visitor in computing and mathematical sciences, modeled the predicted relationship between cellular activity and distance between syntrophic partners that are dependent on the molecular diffusion of a substrate. He found that conventional metabolites—molecules previously predicted to be involved in this syntrophic consumption of methane—such as hydrogen—were inconsistent with the spatial activity patterns observed in the data. However, revised models indicated that electrons could likely make the trip from cell to cell across greater distances.“Chris came up with a generalized model for the methane-oxidizing syntrophy based on direct electron transfer, and these model results were a better match to our empirical data,” Orphan says. “This pointed to the possibility that these archaea were directly transferring electrons derived from methane to the outside of the cell, and those electrons were being passed to the bacteria directly.”Guided by this information, Chadwick and McGlynn looked for independent evidence to support the possibility of direct interspecies electron transfer. Cultured bacteria, such as those from the genus Geobacter, are model organisms for the direct electron transfer process. These bacteria use large proteins, called multi-heme cytochromes, on their outer surface that act as conductive “wires” for the transport of electrons.Using genome analysis—along with transmission electron microscopy and a stain that reacts with these multi-heme cytochromes—the researchers showed that these conductive proteins were also present on the outer surface of the archaea they were studying. And that finding, Orphan says, can explain why the spatial arrangement of the syntrophic partners does not seem to affect their relationship or activity.“It’s really one of the first examples of direct interspecies electron transfer occurring between uncultured microorganisms in the environment. Our hunch is that this is going to be more common than is currently recognized,” she says.Orphan notes that the information they have learned about this relationship will help to expand how researchers think about interspecies microbial interactions in nature. In addition, the microscale stable isotope approach used in the current study can be used to evaluate interspecies electron transport and other forms of microbial symbiosis occurring in the environment.These results were published in a paper titled, “Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.” The work was funded by the Department of Energy Division of Biological and Environmental Research and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Marine Microbiology Initiative. First Heatwave Expected Next Week HerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Female Fashion Trends That Guys Can’t StandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business Newscenter_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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3 May
2021

Top 10 Legal Stories Of 2017 Focus On Law Schools, Court Changes

first_imgExperts including former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard have sounded alarms for years about a looming crisis in legal education. The crisis hit home — hard — in Indiana in 2017.The closing of 4-year-old Indiana Tech Law School in Fort Wayne, and the revelation that 138-year-old Valparaiso University Law School faced an uncertain future, made law school troubles the top legal news story of 2017, as determined by the staff of Indiana Lawyer.While the fate of two Indiana law schools was the runaway choice for the year’s top news, many of the rest of the year’s top stories were close in staff balloting. Big news from federal and state courts as well as significant developments in the legal community and legislature were among IL’s top legal news stories of 2017.Here are the Top 10 IL legal news stories for 2017, as well as those stories our staff singled out as worthy of inclusion in this Year in Review edition.Law School Troubles Hit HomeIndiana Tech Law School closed its doors in June, disillusioning some students who believed the upstart had not been given enough time. Citing a $20 million loss and student admissions that never amounted to what the institution had expected, Indiana Tech announced last year it would close the Fort Wayne campus, so its shuttering was not unexpected.More stunning were developments this year at Valparaiso University Law School. Valpo, which had been under censure from the American Bar Association for noncompliance with admissions standards, announced in August an incoming first-year class of just 28 students. The Class of 2020 was 73 percent smaller than the Class of 2019, though Valpo’s new 1L class boasted the highest LSAT scores and GPAs in years.The ABA lifted its censure of Valpo in November, but that same month, the law school made another startling announcement. Due to “severe financial challenges,” the school said, no first-year students would be admitted in 2018. While insisting Valpo Law isn’t closing, university president Mark Heckler said the law school will be “exploring the full range of possibilities,” which could include affiliation with another law school or geographic relocation.As for Indiana Tech, the ABA withdrew its provisional accreditation in October.Personal, Professional Losses In Federal CourtKind, compassionate, focused, smart, talented, dedicated. Those are some of the words friends and colleagues used to describe Magistrate Judge Denise K. LaRue, 59, who died Aug. 2 after a battle with cancer.Brilliant, gregarious, funny, without equal, one-of-a-kind. That’s how Senior Judge Larry McKinney was remembered after he died just 49 days later, at age 73.The sudden losses of such experienced, hard-working, and well-liked jurists would hit any court hard, but the impact of the personal toll on the “federal family” of the District Court for the Southern District of Indiana was just part of the story. Already one of the busiest district courts in the nation, the court has operated for years under judicial emergency conditions, meaning judges handle an average of more than 600 cases each. LaRue’s and McKinney’s deaths led to the emergency lending of judges from district courts in Northern Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin to help keep cases moving.But the court will never be the same. Chief Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson called McKinney’s death “a crushing blow” after LaRue’s passing.Of LaRue, the chief judge said, “Her loss to the members of the court is a permanent one.”Goff Succeeds Rucker on Supreme CourtAfter a pool of 20 applicants was narrowed to three finalists, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb selected a small-town judge as his first appellate court appointment when he named Wabash Superior Judge Christopher Goff to the Indiana Supreme Court. “Judge Goff is deeply devoted to the cause of justice, and his sharp legal mind has been honed by years of practical experience,” Holcomb said in announcing his choice on June 12.Goff succeeds Justice Robert Rucker, who had been the court’s only African-American jurist and the last justice on the court to have been appointed by a Democratic governor. Rucker retired this year after 26 years on the bench. Goff’s appointment is the last in a complete turnover of the five justices of the Indiana Supreme Court that began with Justice Steven David’s appointment in 2010.“I think that if you make a decision to do public service, it’s important to do public service at the highest level that you can do it,” Goff said. “I was humbled to be considered in this process, and it’s been the thrill of my great professional career and my life serving in the Indiana judiciary.”Rucker, 70, departed the court in May. “Having been afforded the opportunity to serve the people of the state of Indiana for more than a quarter of a century has been an honor beyond measure,” he said.Ruling Leaves State Without Means Of ExecutionsCapital punishment by lethal injection is the statutory method of execution in Indiana, but an Indiana Court of Appeals ruling now under review by the Indiana Supreme Court put a temporary halt to the state’s ability to carry out a death sentence.Condemned killer Roy Lee Ward sued the Department of Correction after it changed the drugs used in lethal injection and announced the new formulation. The means of execution had not been adopted using public hearings or soliciting comment as required under the Administrative Rules and Procedure Act, the COA ruled in June. Judge John Baker wrote for the panel that the DOC’s current means of lethal injection was therefore “void and without effect.”The state appealed, arguing that adherence to APRA has never been required of the DOC in establishing a means of execution. Ward argued, and the COA agreed, that because DOC had not been specifically exempted from complying with the administrative law statute, it is bound by its terms. The Indiana Supreme Court heard oral arguments in September, but its decision had not been handed down by IL deadline. None of the dozen people on Indiana’s death row currently have a scheduled execution date.Notre Dame Law’s Barrett appointed to 7th CircuitUniversity of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in November after Senate hearings that were marked by a pitched partisan fight over the role of religion in a judge’s decision-making.Nominated by President Donald Trump to succeed retired Circuit Judge John Tinder, Barrett was confirmed 55-43. She gained the support of Indiana Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly and other Democrats who distanced themselves from questions raised during her confirmation hearing about her past academic writings concerning the role religion should play for judges. Critics blasted the questioning as anti-Catholic. After the smoke of the confirmation fight cleared, Barrett joined the court Nov. 10.Barrett’s wasn’t the only high-profile controversy involving the 7th Circuit. Renowned and acerbic Judge Richard Posner, 78, retired from the court without notice in September. In exiting, he blasted a court he said had become “highly politicized” and dismissive of pro se litigants, among other complaints.Merit Selection Comes To IndianapolisMarion Superior judges will be reapplying for their jobs, in a sense, after the Indiana General Assembly this year passed a law establishing a unique form of merit selection for the Indianapolis judiciary. Marion County joins Allen, Lake and St. Joseph as the only Indiana counties where judges are vetted by a commission that recommends nominees for a governor’s appointment.But the Marion County Judicial Nominating Commission is far different from those in other counties: it’s larger with more expansive duties. Not only will the 14-member panel nominate judges to fill vacancies, it also will recommend to the public whether judges currently in office should be retained, according to the statute. Voters then will have a yes-or-no choice of whether judges who seek another term will be retained.The transition to this new system was anything but smooth. The Urban League, African-American lawmakers and community leaders condemned the proposal at the Statehouse. They claimed the system was discriminatory, pointing out that Indiana voters elect their judges in every county except those with the highest percentage of African-Americans. While opponents vowed to challenge the system, the commission had its first meeting in November, and no court challenges have been filed to date.Key LGBT Workplace RulingThe full 7th Circuit Court of Appeals became the first in the nation to extend workplace protections to include discrimination based on sexual orientation. The landmark en banc decision in Kimberly Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, 15-1720, created a split amont circuits on the issue. The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals reached the opposite conclusion, ruling Title VII of the Civil Rights Act doesn’t bar workplace discrimination against gays and lesbians.Kimberly Hively, a math teacher who initially brought a pro se discrimination complaint against Ivy Tech, claimed she was repeatedly passed over for full-time employment and promotions and eventually fired because she is a lesbian. In April, the 7th Circuit in an 8-3 decision held that Hively could proceed with her suit, holding that Title VII applies to discrimination based on sexual orientation.After the case was remanded to the District Court for the Northern District of Indiana, Hively and Ivy Tech agreed to enter mediation in the dispute. An attorney who represented Hively applauded her bravery for bringing the case. “She changed the world,” said Gregory Nevins of Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund.Marion County Sued Over Early VotingMarion County has provided just one location for early voting since 2010 after expanding early voting in 2008. Common Cause and the NACCP contend in a lawsuit filed in May that the situation in Indianapolis bars equal access to the ballot box, particularly for minority voters.Other Indiana counties have expanded in-person early voting through satellite-voting locations open prior to Election Day. “It’s shameful that the largest county in our state only has one early voting site,” said Indiana NAACP President Barbara Bolling-Williams. Plaintiffs also challenged as unconstitutional a state law that allows one of three county election board members to veto satellite voting.Former Republican Marion County Election Board member Maura Hoff blocked satellite voting, the suit says, meaning all early voting took place only at the City-County Building. The suit claims this created excessive lines and long waits, depriving voters of an equal opportunity to cast an early ballot, and suppressing turnout. The case is pending in the District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.Courts Struggle To Deal With OpioidsAcross Indiana, the human toll of the nation’s opioid epidemic increasingly has become a daily fact of life for judges, lawyers, and the innocent victims — the children of addicts who often become children in need of services. The number of CHINS cases continued to skyrocket in juvenile courts in 2017.Meanwhile, prosecutors, lawmakers and members of the judiciary debated whether the solution to the opioid epidemic lie in more money for drug treatment or funding for tougher law enforcement. Some cities, though — including Hammond and Indianapolis — sued drug companies and distributors over the societal costs.Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush in September was tapped to co-chair a national judicial task force looking at what can be done to address the problem, especially as it relates to impacts on children.Trump Travel Ban Vexes Immigrants, AttorneysAfter President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday, January 27, restricting travel from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yeman, Indiana immigration attorneys were flooded with calls from panicked immigrants uncertain how the order would affect them.“It’s kind of chaotic at this point,” one Indianapolis immigration attorney said the following Monday, after a weekend dominated by news of pandemonium and protests at airports. Courts eventually blocked Trump’s initial travel ban, and a revised travel ban that also includes nations such as North Korea and Chad has had mixed results overcoming court scrutiny.The Supreme Court allowed a revised travel bans to take effect in December.In addition to the year’s Top 10 legal news stories, IL staff members also selected these stories as some of the year’s most significant:Bar exam blues: Fewer than half the law school graduates who sat for the February 2017 Indiana Bar Exam passed — a troubling development that some observers feared might be a new normal. The 48 percent passage rate for the February exam was the lowest since 2002. Pass rates for the July 2017 bar exam, meanwhile, were relatively unchanged — 73 percent passed, a 1-percentage-point increase over the July 2016 results.IndianaPOLIS Criminal Justice Center: Indianapolis mayor Joe Hogsett in January announced plans for a new criminal justice center in the Twin-Aire neighborhood of the Circle City. The proposed facility southeast of downtown would combine courts, a new jail and other judicial functions with an emphasis on substance abuse and mental health treatment and services for offenders.Staggering settlement: The state of Indiana agreed to pay $25 million to settle a northern Indiana family’s $31 million judgment against the Department of Child Services for its abuses in prosecuting parents based on falsified claims of child abuse. The settlement was by far the largest lump sum ever paid from the Indiana Tort Claims Fund.Another round of alcohol debate: Lawmakers continued to study changes in Indiana’s alcohol laws that could include Sunday sales, among others. Ricker’s found a loophole that allowed it to sell cold beer in some convenience stores. Monarch Beverage again turned to court, where it unsuccessfully continued to wage lawsuits seeking to permit it to distribute liquor as well as beer and wine. A legislative panel made recommendations that will be considered in 2018.Gun laws: The Indiana General Assembly heard from advocates and opponents of so-called “constitutional carry,” which would permit any eligible person to carry a concealed weapon without a license. The proposal is likely to be a hot topic in the 2018 session. Lawmakers last year also passed a bill allowing Statehouse staff to carry guns.State whistleblowers, beware: The Indiana Supreme Court ruled that state employees are not covered by Indiana’s whistleblower law. Justices ruled 4-1 in a case brought by fired Indiana Department of Environmental Management employee Sue Esserman, who alleged she was fired in retaliation for questioning claims that the department paid from its Excess Liability Trust Fund.• December 27, 2017Dave Stafford for TheIndianaLawyer FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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