18 Dec
2020

Net Neutrality Will Help Local Entrepreneurs and Small Businesses

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island tech companies and entrepreneurs could benefit greatly from the new Internet regulations adopted recently by the Federal Communications Commission.The federal agency’s ruling imposes “net neutrality” on Internet Service Providers (ISPs), which means they can no longer block or slow traffic to the websites of companies that anger them or refuse to pay an extra fee. This regulation can help many local start-ups and content providers because they often don’t have extra funds when starting their businesses to pay the telecomm companies for preferential treatment. Previously, content providers such as Netflix paid ISPs extra money to ensure that their videos downloaded faster than other companies’ videos. Some websites that didn’t pay extra saw their video downloading speeds slowed down considerably.Additionally, other potential benefits will accrue under the new regulations. For example, ISPs will now be regulated as a public utility, thus the FCC could theoretically require telecomm giants such as Time Warner to open their lines to competing ISPs. If that happens, local start-ups who want to get in on the growing demand for Internet service would be able to use existing cable and phone wires to offer a competing service. This development would not only create opportunities for new ISPs but the resulting competition could lower prices and improve service for all businesses using the Internet. At the moment, a handful of big corporations control Internet access for most of America, resulting in Internet service that is slower and more expensive than that offered in many other countries.Reliable, affordable Internet access is essential for doing business these days. The FCC’s new policies help ensure that entrepreneurs and small businesses will be treated fairly and that they can better compete with the big corporations.Mark Grabowski is a lawyer who teaches Internet law at Adelphi University. For more info, visit markgrabowski.com.last_img read more

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19 Oct
2020

Jakarta Police rule death of Metro TV editor as suicide

first_imgTopics : The police said the man had visited a specialist at a hospital in Central Jakarta several days prior to his death about a medical condition that could have been a trigger for depression.The man, 26, was found dead on the roadside of the Pesanggrahan Jakarta outer ring toll road by three local children who were flying kites at around 11:45 a.m. on July 11. Police then opened an investigation and questioned 34 witnesses.Tubagus said further examination of the evidence at the crime scene suggested the case was a suicide, including a neatly parked motorcycle that showed no sign of damage and still had the key in the ignition, a knife and a bloodstain and a strand of hair and that matched the man’s DNA. No evidence that could link another individual to the case was found on his body or at the scene, he said.Investigators also found the victim’s DNA on both the handle and the tip of the knife.Witnesses, including local patrol officers, also said there had been no indication of a commotion during that period of time.During the autopsy, four stab wounds were found on the man’s chest and one on his neck. Jakarta Police forensic expert Arif Wahyono said no other wounds or signs of violence were found on the body. He explained that the shallow stabs wounds found on the body were most likely trial wounds commonly found in cases of suicide.The wound on his neck is believed to be the cause of his death. The forensic investigation also found that man had consumed amphetamines, Arif said.Police suspect that the consumption of drugs had triggered him to dare to take his own life.The victim’s father said the family refused to believe he had committed suicide. He said his son had shown no signs of sadness or depression prior to his death.”As his parent, I’m honestly disappointed in the [investigation] result, because there’s no way my son committed suicide,” he told Metro TV in a televised interview on Saturday.If you are having suicidal thoughts, please talk to someone. You can start here if you need information related to mental illness: https://www.intothelightid.org/tentang-bunuh-diri/layanan-konseling-psikolog-psikiater/center_img The Jakarta Police have ruled that the cause of a recent death of a video editor for private TV station Metro TV was suicide triggered by depression as no evidence has been found to suggest involvement of other parties.Jakarta Police’s general crimes director Sr. Comr. Tubagus Ade Hidayat said the evidence found at the scene and through the forensic investigation did not suggest that other parties were present at the time of the man’s death, which is believed to have occurred between 12 a.m. and 2 a.m on July 8.“From the crime scene investigation and experts’ assessment as well as supporting evidence, investigators strongly suspect that he committed suicide,” he said during a televised press conference at the Jakarta Police headquarters on Saturday.last_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

Sexual assault survey sent to gauge campus climate

first_imgVice Provost for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry sent an email invitation to the student body to take the Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct last week. The 20-30 minute survey aims to collect student opinions that will be factored into shaping safety policies, prevention education programming, and law enforcement measures.A few incentives exist to encourage participation: 6,000 students will be offered a $5 Amazon gift card for completing the survey, and students who were not selected for the gift card are entered into a lottery to win a $500 prize by visiting the website. Two students will then be selected for two $500 prizes.The Association of American Universities, a national association of 62 research universities in the United States and Canada, is leading the survey initiative.The organization partnered with the research firm Westat, to design and deliver the survey to its member universities. Barry Toiv, the vice president for public affairs at AAU, said administrators’ desire to gather more information about student attitudes and opinions about sexual assault that prompted the development of such a survey.“AAU took this on and [we] have never done this before,” Toiv said. “AAU entered into an agreement with Westat because Westat is one of the top private research firms in the country. They brought in expertise specifically with respect to sexual assault, which is of course very sensitive and complex so it requires a certain expertise to do right. A committee of faculty and university administrators who worked in student life was put together from different universities in the nation to work with Westat to develop the survey.”Carry hopes that the administration can learn how to improve existing programs or introduce new initiatives based on the information the survey reveals. The questions in the survey are tailored to specifically gauge information regarding student awareness of the resources on campus and prevalence of sexual misconduct incidents.“There’s been a discussion about colleges and universities understanding the climate on their campus related to sexual misconduct. I think the most effective way to do that is to ask students: what’s working and what’s not working, do you have access to resources, are you aware of the resources, and have you had an experience related to sexual misconduct?” Carry said. “It’ll be helpful for me to understand what do students know and what do they don’t know so we can retarget our marketing efforts.”Carry said 28 of the 62 universities in AAU have decided to take part in the survey. To keep certain factors standardized, all universities participating are offering the same incentives to their respective students.“By joining this national effort, we will have results from almost 30 institutions of higher education. We [will] get a chance to compare and look at opportunities for growth,” Carry said.Though Carry said that a good turnout for such a large-scale survey is typically 15 percent to 20 percent of the student body, Carry’s personal hope is for all students to participate so the sample size of students can be as large as possible. As for the future, Carry foresees releasing a survey like this one every two or three years to measure the results of enacted programs.Kaitlyn Hittelman, a junior majoring in international relations (global business), is currently studying abroad in Turkey; however, she is familiar with the survey from her work last semester as the co-chair of the Greek Sexual Assault Task Force.“From my discussions with the Title IX office, I know that they are really interested in getting student feedback and making as many changes as necessary to make everyone feel safe on campus,” Hittelman said. “I would hope that they would be able to better structure their sexual assault prevention and bystander intervention programming to better fit the needs of the campus based on the results of the survey, to see where it seems that students are lacking in knowledge or in comfort.”Vanessa Diaz, a sophomore majoring in American studies and the assistant director of Women’s Student Assembly, weighed the benefits and flaws the survey has for documenting the number of sexual assault incidences that may have otherwise gone unaccounted for in the statistics.“A lot of people who experience sexual assault don’t report it because it’s an invasive process that is time-consuming and often do not result in favorable outcomes. People may feel more comfortable doing so in an online survey. However, the survey is also problematic because it too asks invasive questions that trigger traumatic memories,” Diaz said.In the case of the latter, Diaz hopes that the administration allocate more resources to the Title IX office in terms of funds and training.Students can find the invitation to take the Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct survey in their email. The survey will close on April 22.last_img read more

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