14 Jun
2021

Ethanol Takes Center Stage in Senate Campaign

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Ethanol Takes Center Stage in Senate Campaign Ethanol Takes Center Stage in Senate Campaign Facebook Twitter SHARE By Gary Truitt – May 23, 2012 Facebook Twitter Donnelly said, in addition, ethanol provides the US with energy security, “We are fortunate to have such a vibrant industry in this state that benefits so many Indiana farmers, producers at facilities like this one, and families at the pump.  We need to go all-in on American energy production so we stop sending our hard-earned tax dollars overseas.  Indiana can be a leader in this effort with our ethanol production.”GOP candidate Richard Mourdock is on record questioning ethanol’s value. Donnelly told HAT he is a solid supporter of ethanol, “I just don’t understand how Richard Mourdock can say ethanol costs more.” According to the Indiana Corn Marketing Council, 3,500 Hoosier jobs are dependent upon the state’s ethanol industry, and the industry generates $3.4 billion in economic activity in Indiana every year.  “While Richard Mourdock chooses to spread misinformation about ethanol, I am proud to be here today to recognize the importance of this industry to middle-class families and rural communities across our state,” Donnelly said.Donnelly said he would work to remove the special tax breaks the oil industry gets to put them on a level playing field with renewable energy sources, “I strongly believe we need to set partisanship aside to get things done for Hoosier middle-class families, which is why I wholeheartedly support the ethanol industry.”center_img SHARE Congressman Joe Donnelly toured the POET ethanol plant at Alexandria in Madison County on Wednesday as a way to highlight his support for ethanol and also the differences between him and his opponent Richard Murdock. Donnelly told HAT he was impressed with the facility, “The technology just keeps getting better and better.” He said the plant buys corn from a 7 county area providing an economic boost to the entire region. The behind-the-scenes tour and discussion about ethanol was led by Dave Hudak, the General Manager of the Alexandria plant and Secretary of the Indiana Ethanol Producers Association. . Audio Playerhttps://media.blubrry.com/hoosieragtoday/p/www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/05/donnelywrap.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Podcast: Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: RSS Previous articleUSDA Doesn’t Want to Change Report Release Times without Public InputNext articleIndiana Observes 150 Years for USDA Gary Truitt [audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/05/donnelywrap.mp3|titles=Ethanol Takes Center Stage in Senate Campaign]last_img read more

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18 Jan
2021

Anna-Jane Casey and More to Star in London’s Forbidden Broadway

first_img Casey, who starred in the 2009 production of Menier’s Forbidden Broadway, has also appeared in Billy Elliot, Spamalot, Company and Sunday in the Park with George. Dann, who received an Olivier nomination for Lend Me a Tenor—the Musical, has also stared in a previous incarnation of Forbidden Broadway, in addition to Sunday in the Park with George. Humbley recently took to the Menier stage in Merrily We Roll Along and has also appeared in productions of Company, Lend Me a Tenor—the Musical and The Last Five Years. Lewis’ theater credits include Candide, Therese Raquin, Love Never Dies, A Little Night Music, Spamalot and Priscilla—Queen of the Desert. Under the direction of Phillip George, who also helms the show in New York, Forbidden Broadway will feature music direction by Joel Fram, costumes by Morgan Large and sound design by Gareth Owen. View Commentscenter_img Anna-Jane Casey, Sophie-Louise Dann, Damian Humbley and Ben Lewis will star in the previously announced London return of Gerard Alessandrini’s Forbidden Broadway. New York’s longest-running comedy revue will feature takes on productions from both Broadway and the West End, including The Book of Mormon, Once, Matilda, Wicked and Miss Saigon. Performances begin June 19 prior to a July 2 opening night at the Menier Chocolate Factory. The show will play through August 16.last_img read more

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19 Oct
2020

Netanyahu vows relief as Israelis fume over virus-battered economy

first_img“This support, this grant, is not dependent on legislation and we have instructed that it be put into effect today. The button will be pressed and the money will reach accounts in the coming days,” he said.  He also announced a broader aid package for workers and small business owners would advance through Israel’s parliament, the Knesset, over the coming days.The influential columnist with Israel’s Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper, Nahum Barnea, said Saturday’s demonstration reflected the breadth of suffering in the Jewish state. “The protest ran the entire gamut, from owners of small businesses that had collapsed, to unemployed people from the entertainment industry, musicians, stage hands and people from the tourism sector,” he wrote.  Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday pledged immediate financial aid to Israelis whose livelihoods have been devastated by the coronavirus, as his government faces mounting anger over its pandemic response. Thousands of protesters turned out in Tel Aviv on Saturday to voice frustration at Netanyahu, who won praise for his early response to the outbreak but has come under criticism amid a resurgence in cases. Netanyahu did not mention the Tel Aviv protest ahead of his weekly cabinet meeting, but promised that financial help was on the way, starting with cash disbursement of up to 7,500 shekels ($2,170) to the self-employed. Barnea argued that Netanyahu has a history of showing disdain for protests against his leadership, but said he expected the premier to increasingly open the government coffers to quell public anger. “A protest that is about money can be placated with money,” he said. Netanyahu has conceded that Israel’s broad re-opening was premature, but also cautioned against renewed lockdown measures that would again bring economic activity to a halt. While restaurants remain open, new restrictions targeting bars, event venues and places of worship are being implemented. Israel, a country of some 9 million people, has recorded more than 38,000 coronavirus cases, including 358 deaths. The Jewish state last week registered more than 1,000 new cases in a 24 hour period multiple times last, a major spike compared to daily figures that typically hovered below 50 before the economy reopened. Topics :last_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

Badgers relying on youth

first_imgSaturday night the Wisconsin men’s hockey team (3-1-2, 2-1-1 WCHA) showed how it will reap the benefits of last year’s national championship for years to come. The Badgers handed Minnesota-Duluth its first loss of the season due in large part to the significant contributions of a highly talented freshman class.Injuries to UW forwards Jack Skille and Ross Carlson and defenseman Kyle Klubertanz has given UW head coach Mike Eaves a chance to get some mileage from his youngsters, and so far they have not disappointed. In Saturday’s 5-2 victory, Jamie McBain and Ben Grotting netted their first-career goals while three other Badgers recorded their first assists. “Well it was definitely a positive and you sure hope those kids are getting their first goals because they are getting opportunities,” Eaves said. “I know they are thrilled and their teammates were thrilled for them so now they can cross that off the to do list and get back to playing.”With Wisconsin down 1-0, Grotting evened the score at one as freshmen John Mitchell and Andy Bohmbach garnered their first assists and points as Badgers on the play. Blake Geoffrion also recorded his first point as a Badger, assisting on Ben Steeets’ first-period goal. With 12 seconds remaining in a dismal second period for the Badgers, McBain sent Wisconsin to the locker room with a lead, and more importantly, something to build on. In the home-opener against North Dakota, McBain misplayed the puck in overtime allowing UND to steal a come-from-behind victory at the Kohl Center. Eaves, however, feels McBain has the right mindset to be a successful defenseman at the collegiate level. “For him (McBain) to be a defenseman in this league and to make that adjustment, it’s a big step,” Eaves said. “I like his attitude because he’s got a perfect mindset like a defensive back in football, he kind of lets it roll off and he gets ready for the next shift and that will benefit him down the line.” Eaves outlined tentative time tables for the injured players’ return. Klubertanz is week-to-week, Carlson should be ready within four weeks while Skille is expected to be sidelined for the next four to six weeks. In the meantime, one of the best recruiting classes in the nation will have to maintain their high level of play in order for the Badgers to be successful. Contrasting StylesMuch of the Badgers’ success this weekend came at the expense of goaltender Alex Stalock. The freshman netminder is not afraid to venture outside the crease and oftentimes acts as a third defenseman, making outlet passes to his forwards. While Eaves has respect for Stalock and his ambitious play, he is quite content with Elliott’s consistent goaltending and positioning. “I’d much rather have our style of goaltending,” Eaves said. “Mr. Stalock stopped the puck but there were a few times where there were people in the net behind him and you could see how active he is; it’s a little bit of an adventure, but the bottom line is that he stops the pucks … I know as a coach I would probably have a few more gray hairs with that style.” Elliott on the other hand was a rock of stability in net all weekend including a 34-save effort Saturday night. Last year’s Hobby Baker Award finalist withstood some defensive lapses to give the Badgers a chance to win both nights. “There were a lot of breakdowns and a lot of turnovers in our own zone,” Eaves said. “He (Elliott) was there as our backbone, and he allowed us to have a short-term memory.”Getting DirtyAfter losing three of their top six scorers from a year ago against North Dakota last weekend, Eaves has the Badgers playing a tough grind-it-out style to overcome the loss of scoring. For senior assistant captain Jake Dowell that means playing the same style he has played his whole life. Eaves maintains that the Wisconsin native is the poster boy for the team’s identity. “I don’t know, but it’s definitely not the looks,” Dowell said jokingly of being the team poster boy. “I think he (coach Eaves) was talking about how I don’t mind getting in and playing dirty and physical … I think that’s what he means, and our identity is our hard work; and I have never been a finesse player, but you know hard work obviously pays off.”Saturday Dowell scored two goals, much to the delight of his father, who was watching his son for the first time at the Kohl Center.”I have been waiting for him to come down for over a year now and it was an awesome feeling to be able to play in front of him to see him … I knew exactly where he was and to be able to get a goal and to have him see it meant the world to me,” Dowell said.last_img read more

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