27 Feb
2021

Telecom is in Motion Now

first_imgHaving a fast path to deliver new services, value and enter new markets is the motivation to move forward. A necessary step to do this is the deployment of a new class of software oriented virtualized infrastructure. The list of new markets and offerings at MWC was huge and included connected cars, Internet of Things, home security, personalized services, cloud mediation and brokering, collaborative communications, health and wellness, and smart cities. Beyond these new services, most operators see that moving their existing network functions to a new infrastructure will have huge impacts on capital expenditures, operating expenditures and agility. There are no longer debates over impact on current and potential future business opportunities. Almost universally, telecom operators are moving to production. Last year the industry was mostly in evaluation mode, looking for one clear model to adopt. Candidly, it did not exist. What most of the industry has determined is that there are many paths forward and all of them improve operators’ capital expenditures, operating expenditures and opportunity to create and deliver new services. The only wrong answer now is to wait. Over time new technology and new architectures will emerge, but there is now enough technology available with suppliers and partners to assist in implementation that moving forward on any of these paths is now realistic. The telecom industry is huge and attracting even more interest and investment than ever. More than 93,000 people attended MWC from over 200 countries. Beyond that, more than 2,100 companies exhibited (including EMC, VMware & Pivotal). Technology disruption happens best at scale and MWC showed that this scale of involvement is expanding rapidly, so we should see plenty of radical and interesting innovation fueling the shift. Based on Mobile World Congress (MWC) last month, we are now entering another time when the telecom technology landscape is evolving rapidly. There will be a huge shift to virtualized, agile, software oriented and common building block-based telecom clouds. This shift is at least as big, if not bigger, than any of the prior changes and my bet is that it will also spawn huge indirect IT ecosystem changes over time.I have been involved in telecom for a few decades and have seen the industry change significantly. It’s hard to predict exactly what the end state will be, but it is both exciting and terrifying in that with these huge changes, lots of status quo perspectives will be challenged and new models will start to emerge. Personally I love this kind of change. In an industry that invests hundreds of billions in capital expenditures alone, change at this scale can be transformational for many more than just the operators themselves.Here’s my short list of conclusions from this year’s Mobile World Congress:center_img The infrastructure that will underpin the new services is not universal or consistent. In fact, what we see is that there will be many ways to build out these next generation virtualized, agile, software oriented infrastructures.There is a spectrum of options. On one end are the telecom clouds based on proven architectures of modern enterprise environments at scale. They use what works, including VMware, EMC storage arrays, vBlocks, x86 servers and IP networking. These are the building blocks of the biggest banks, governments and manufacturers in the world and many telecom operators are starting with these tools and moving quickly. At the other end, some operators are exploring technical components that come from the webscale world. The tools used in that environment include container-based virtualization, heavy use of white box hardware and software-based infrastructure tools such as EMC ScaleIO or ViPR.However given the scale and complexity of most operators, the toolkit of choice is a combination of proven infrastructure and new technology. This is not surprising since the workloads on a modern telecom cloud will range from core mission critical to exploratory and experimental. Having a host of tools in the cloud architecture gives the platform the flexibility to support that diversity. As long as the technology results in an agile, software oriented, shared, virtualized cloud, there is no wrong answer. Finally, this next phase of the telecom ecosystem is a huge opportunity for the EMC Federation. We have spent the past decade virtualizing the enterprise world and the impact has been huge. Efficiency in data centers is up dramatically, costs per unit of compute and storage are down dramatically, time to deploy applications is down by orders of magnitude and resiliency and agility are both better than they have ever been in modern IT.In this next phase of telecom (NFV, telco transformation, telco clouds, etc.), the end state is similar even if the technology continues to evolve to better serve specific telecom needs. EMC Federation efforts over the past few years have not just delivered the existing building blocks, but added new hardware capabilities, new infrastructure tools, and higher level technology focused on big data and application development and delivery.Our engagement model with operators is focused on leveraging this massive toolset of modern infrastructure capability plus deep technical expertise to collaborate on building out next generation infrastructures. Our telecom customers are engaged and looking for the kind of deep collaboration EMC does well.Having seen telecom evolve before, I know it’s always a long journey. However, I am convinced that the industry is now fully in motion and I look forward to the innovation once these next generation telecom infrastructures become available to the world. Overall a very exciting indicator of things to come.last_img read more

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31 Dec
2020

Wood Mackenzie: Global solar installations to hit record 114.5GW in 2019

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Global solar PV installations will reach a new high of 114.5 gigawatts in 2019, up 17.5 percent over 2018.According to Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables’ new report, Global Solar PV Market Outlook Update: Q2 2019, the market is now back on a strong growth trajectory after a slowdown in 2018. Annual installations are expected to rise to around 125 gigawatts per year by the early 2020s.Global growth will continue despite a gradual decline in China, the world’s largest PV market. The Chinese market peaked at 53 gigawatts in 2017, driven by generous feed-in tariffs. We anticipate that a move toward more competitive procurement of solar PV will lead to more sustainable annual additions of 30 to 40 gigawatts.Countries installing between 1 to 5 gigawatts annually will be the market’s growth engine. In 2018, there were seven such markets. By 2022, we forecast that there will be 19, with new names added to the list including Saudi Arabia, France and Taiwan.In India, auction activity is starting to recover after a slowdown caused by land and transmission constraints. In the U.S., announcements of new state utility integrated resource plans, in Florida for example, are good news for the solar PV market.The European market will grow strongly as policy-driven markets look to deliver on 2020 and 2030 renewable energy targets.More: Global solar installations to reach record high in 2019 Wood Mackenzie: Global solar installations to hit record 114.5GW in 2019last_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

USC frontcourt remains full of questions, potential

first_imgFollow us on Twitter @dailytrojan With the end of football season just around the corner, the Trojan faithful will now be turning their attention to the USC men’s basketball team.Athletic Director Pat Haden made a huge splash in April in hiring head coach Andy Enfield to replace the fired Kevin O’Neill and, hopefully, change the direction of the flailing basketball program.The move received mixed reviews, with some looking at the hire as a glorified publicity stunt for a program that has struggled to fill the Galen Center seats and others believing Enfield’s high-octane offense will translate well to the Pac-12.One thing is absolutely for certain, though — this USC basketball season will be one to watch.Senior center Omar Oraby shined at times last season, mostly coming off the bench in O’Neill’s slowed-down system, but seemed to struggle in critical moments. Still, his 7-foot-2 frame cannot be ignored in the bruising Pac-12, so fans should expect his minutes to increase, and for the Rice transfer to play a dominant role on this year’s squad.The Cairo, Egypt native averaged a respectable 6.3 points and 3.9 rebounds in just over 14 minutes per game. His real presence, however, was felt on the defensive end, where he averaged 1.5 blocks per contest.Though Oraby should enter the season as the Trojans’ starting center, questions remain about how he will fare in Enfield’s new offensive system.“I’ve been working in the offseason very hard on my conditioning and my quickness,” Oraby said. “My main focus was to get my conditioning better and to start and stay in the game as long as I can.”Oraby seems to be settled in as the team’s most dangerous low-post presence, but it is not clear who Enfield and his staff will select to join him in the frontcourt as the starter at power forward.Sophomore forward Strahinja  Gavrilovic seems to be the early favorite, as the Serbia native made some impressive strides this summer.Last season, Gavrilovic appeared in just six games, but has shown that he has a very potent inside-out game. His three-point range is especially intriguing, as it could make him a great tandem play with Oraby, who does most of his work deep in the post on the low block.“I like Coach Enfield’s system, especially because I’m prepared to run,” Gavrilovic said. “I like how he plays me in the four-spot. He wants me to spread the floor [and] to shoot threes. I have more opportunities here in this system.”In addition to Gavrilovic, a pair of freshman forwards in Roschon Prince and Nikola Jovanovic will also be given an opportunity early in the season to compete for minutes and potentially grab a starting spot.Prince comes to USC after an extremely heralded prep career that saw him earn the Gatorade High School Player of the Year award for the state of California as a senior. During his time at perennial powerhouse Long Beach Polytechnic High School, Prince established himself as an extremely aggressive player on both ends of the floor, and is expected to make an impact on the program for years to come.Whereas Prince excels at the dirty work inside the paint, Jovanovic prefers to utilize his quickness and technique to cause mismatches for opposing teams. At 6-foot-10, he will be taller than most of the power forwards who try to guard him, and he is already known as one of the better shooters on the team.“I like to score and rebound. Somehow I am always in the right place at the right time,” Jovanovic said. “I will shoot the three-point shot whenever I have a chance.”For now, Enfield might be coy about who he wants in his starting lineup, but one thing is for certain — he’s promising fun and excitement, and he wants the fans to come out and show support, regardless of who starts at forward or any other position.“I think our whole team is exciting,” Enfield said. “It’s going to be a lot of fun, so the student and fan experience should be awesome.”The Trojans’ season opener is  on Friday against Utah State in Logan, Utah. The team opens at home Nov. 12 against Cal State Northridge at the Galen Center.last_img read more

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