2 Mar
2021

Umphrey’s McGee Continues Brooklyn Takeover With Members Of Snarky Puppy, TAUK, Huntertones [Audio/Photos]

first_imgOn Friday night, Umphrey’s McGee continued their ongoing Wax On, Wax Off tour with their second of three performances at Brooklyn Steel in Brooklyn, NY.Umphrey’s McGee Pulls Out Rarities, Covers Prince & Blue Öyster Cult In Brooklyn OpenerAs a special treat for NYC fans, Umphrey’s revived the horn-enhanced version of their cover of INXS‘s “What You Need”, which was originally debuted on New Year’s Eve at The Tabernacle in Atlanta, Georgia. For the set-closing cover, Umphrey’s welcomed out trumpeter Mike Maher (Snarky Puppy), trombonist Chris Ott (Huntertones), and saxophonist Dan White (Huntertones).The horn section returned in the second set for versions of Little Feat‘s “Fat Man In The Bathtub”, which was also debuted on NYE, and their own “Bad Friday”. To close the second set, the band welcomed percussionist Isaac Teel (TAUK) for “August”, which featured a “Human Nature” by Michael Jackson intro.Thanks to taper opsopcopolis, you can listen to the full show below:Umphrey’s McGee – 2/15/19 – Full Audio[Audio: opsopcopolis]Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee | Brooklyn Steel | Brooklyn, NY | 2/15/19Set 1: Maybe Someday > Push & Pull, Red Tape, Example 1 > Night Nurse > Little Gift, Wife Soup, What You Need[1]Set 2: Plunger > Turn & Dub, Fat Man in the Bathtub[1], Bad Friday[1], August[2]Encore: Much Obliged[3] > Kula[1] with Mike Maher on trumpet, Chris Ott on trombone, and Dan White on tenor saxophone[2] with Human Nature (Michael Jackson) intro from Ryan; with Isaac Teel and Jake on percussion[3] unfinishedUmphrey’s McGee | Brooklyn Steel | Brooklyn, NY | 2/15/19 | Photos: Capacity Images Photo: Chris Capaci Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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16 Dec
2020

‘Cool Downtowns’ Won’t Cut It If Long Island’s Millennials Can’t Afford to Live, Work and Play Here

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York All too often when the subject is Long Island’s millennial population, the topic is only addressed rhetorically at best: “What do Millennials Want?” “Why Are Millennials Different?” Or, tellingly, “Where Will Millennials Live?”These questions are genuine but the discourse never draws any significant conclusion.Policymakers, stakeholders and developers need to realize that millennials here—and across the country—want what every generation that came before them has wanted: decent housing at a fair price, and a good paying job. Not much mystery there, yet our region continually struggles with these issues.Throw into the mix the ever-ominous phrase “Brain Drain,” and what you get are buzzwords and inertia. The Brain Drain, a topic which I’ve written on at length, is a multifaceted excuse for developers, policymakers and whoever else is itching to put a shovel in the ground, to justify their projects.A quick look into the actual population statistics reveals the fact that LI is experiencing a “birth dearth,” a natural cycle that highlights lower birth rates. Further research also yields another interesting trend—seemingly every area is experiencing a “brain drain” of some kind. The pressing question that none of these policymakers or stakeholders ask is: if every county, town and village is experiencing a brain drain, where, exactly, are these young people winding up?Since I’ve started writing on the topic (and will continue to do so!), the narrative on the Island is starting to recognize the birth dearth theory, which was popularized locally by progressive planners such as Seth Forman.Recently, Amanda Fiscina, a former classmate of mine at Fordham University, wrote a compelling column for Newsday entitled “Where Should 20-Somethings on Long Island Live?”  By focusing on actions that can be taken like approving mixed-use zoning and supplying more apartments and co-ops, she offered a fresh take on topics that have been beaten to death by vested interests.LI’s millennials, often the focal point of development strategies from both local government and private enterprise, need more affordable options. Instead of merely arguing for “cool downtowns” as so many think pieces on the subject tend to do, Fiscina argues for smart incentives to promote greater diversity of housing stock and suggests realistic means for millennials to build equity while remaining in the region.Time and time again, policymakers, and the nonprofits, developers and the stakeholders who local leaders task with addressing this supposedly critical issue all say the same thing. If you build it, they will come—“cool downtowns” with restaurants, rooftop bars, bus-rapid transit and so on—with little to no consideration on how, exactly, the millennials who are being targeted with these “destinations” will be able to frequent those places being built. Millennials on Long Island need decent job opportunities, not organic spas that they can barely afford.Fiscina hit a nerve when she wrote: “The lack of housing choices is pushing millennials off the Island or to move in with their families. It’s time to stop judging when we pick those two options if Long Island won’t build what we need.”She’s right—we’re not building what millennials really need. Our regional economy must be diversified. Retail expansion is what passes for economic development, but few millennials loaded down with student loan debt can support a “cool” lifestyle on LI on retail wages alone. It’s time to adapt the Island’s suburbia to the employment trends and economic demands of the 21st century.As our hospitality and retail industries swell, other occupations offering higher salaries and better opportunities for educated residents continue either to decline, as is the case of local manufacturing, or struggle to establish a foothold in the Nassau-Suffolk region. Our current transit-oriented boom is rooted in sound planning principles, but the region must go further. It is one thing to build rental housing, but if it isn’t affordable for the supposed target audience, then what good is it?Fortunately, there is hope. Efforts to incubate new technology firms from non-profit groups such as Accelerate Long Island and LaunchPad Huntington, and a renewed focus by the Rauch Foundation to help coordinate the Island’s prestigious research institutions may attract attention from the right business sectors and lead to job creation. Let’s take it to the next level by synchronizing the approach of local Industrial Development Agencies to accompany the endeavors of the Long Island Association. If LI’s municipalities no longer have to compete with one another, our region will be free to stave off bigger threats from other states.As a result, millennials may finally get the creative solutions to the complex problems vexing them here today.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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28 Dec
2019

Where does it go?

first_imgRe: “DWP wants new rate hikes” (March 30 Councilman Tony Cardenas said the ratepayers need to know the details. I’m a ratepayer, and the alarming details I know are: The DWP gives $100-plus million to the city General Fund each year, and I don’t get notified what that money is used for. The city also collects a 10 percent utility tax on every DWP/city utility bill, and I don’t get notified what that money is used for. The sewer service charge is going to go up and has gone up a lot more than any water rate increase I’ve ever seen. I say that Water and Power revenue should be for Water and Power use only. I don’t want to see any gray areas. – Dennis T. Miller Tujunga DWP articles In Regards to DWP, past Daily News headlines Include: – Sept. 13, ’05: “Oops! DWP flub leaves 2 million powerless” – Sept. 21, ’05: “Big raises for DWP” – March 20, ’06: “OT flows like water at DWP” – March 30, ’06: “DWP wants new rate hikes” As a proud DWP employee, I am tired of the Daily News constantly bashing us. Why can’t you print some of the wonderful things this utility does within our communities, such as several of the facilities have adopted local schools? And yes, I am on my 15-minute break while I write this. – Cheryl Linn Power North Hills Dodgers uniforms Re: “Dodgers’ fans to sit pretty in new seats” (March 30) Frank McCourt spending $20 million renovating Dodger Stadium is impressive. Perhaps that’s why he didn’t have enough money left for the players’ names on the back of their uniforms. Despite that annoyance, I’ll continue to root for the old home team as I have since 1941 when I lived in the Bronx, a Brooklyn Dodger faithful midst taunting friends, fans of the hated Yankees. – Robert Schick Northridge Another unjust war On Thursday, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said that Iran can have nuclear power plants but cannot enrich uranium. Nuclear power plants require enrichment of nuclear fuels. Rice is therefore suggesting that Iran accept dependence on foreign nations for their energy programs, but the U.S. has no authority to impose such a restriction. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty only forbids member nations from developing nuclear weapons. The treaty explicitly permits development of nuclear energy and does not restrict enrichment technology. The Bush administration has shown that they cannot be trusted with regard to what they claim to know. If they have any evidence that Iran’s nuclear program is for military purposes, let them prove this. Let’s not get into another unjust war. – David Holland Northridge Policing protest Re: “Biggest protest in city history hits tough immigration bill” (March 26 Not only was this the largest protest in the history of L.A., it was the largest in the nation. There were no serious incidents, no arrests or injuries. Chief Bratton and LAPD officers should be commended for their outstanding efforts in keeping the peace. – Monica Harmon Los Angeles Permanent underclass Re: “Latinos: It’s way overdue” (March 29 I am a legal immigrant from Mexico, yet when it comes to the current issues regarding illegal immigration, I can still remain objective. Apparently that is something Antonio Villaraigosa, thousands of protesters, and now Rodolfo F. Acuna cannot do. If they could, they would admit that amnesty without aggressive border enforcement will only create a permanent underclass in this country. If employers have the option of hiring from an immense pool of labor that is willing to work for even less than the “guest workers,” is there any doubt as to who will end up in their factories and fields? Add one more to the list of those in denial: the unions that grouse about the low wages earned by migrant workers on the one hand and advocate an open-border policy on the other. – Michael Cornejo Sunland Quality-of-life issue Re: “Latinos: It’s way overdue” (March 29 Considering Rodolfo F. Acuna’s ranting and name calling, I don’t expect better logic than what he presented. Ironically, 10 years ago, I hoped we could have an open-border system like the European community. But to have something like the EC, the Mexican and Central American governments would have to be stable and democratic, which I do not see in the near future. What the good professor ignores is that we are having uncontrolled growth that is overwhelming our system. Public facilities have posted numbers of maximum occupancy and occupants above that number are being deemed unsafe. That is what we are dealing with now. In this day and age, no one cares that someone is Latino or Chinese or whatever. We are concerned about quality of life. – Elizabeth Cronin Los Angeles Immigrant cartoon Great Patrick O’Connor cartoon on March 28. It truly conveys reality. If we allow immigrants to take care of our kids, pick the vegetables we eat, do our yards, and let’s not forget, allow them into our house to clean, why can’t we share basic civil rights? I think that Congress is just looking out for their interest. Republicans want our cheap labor and some Democrats take our voters for granted. – Baltazar Martinez Sylmar Mideast cartoon The David Horsey cartoon in your March 27 edition implying that there is essentially no difference between terrorists bent on murdering innocent civilians and Israeli soldiers defending their homeland was shocking. The concept of moral equivalence is the most egregious aspect of contemporary popular culture. Palestinians have allowed themselves to be led by people committed to genocide and have created a culture that lauds genocide. Israelis may be mindful of acts of genocide against Jews in the course of history. However, responding to perilous situations by committing genocide against others is unthinkable to Israelis. There is no equivalent. – Rabbi Louis J. Feldman Van Nuys Will not fly Ed Garfalo asks a good question in his letter of March 29: “What did it prove.” Well, Ed, the hundreds of thousands who marched last weekend proved that while peaceful this time, any effort to deport 12 million undocumented people, breaking up families, will not fly. The thousands of schoolchildren (a majority of whom are legal citizens) who left school to march will never settle for their parents being deported. So the short answer, Ed, is that the government that allowed this situation to develop had better come up with a good solution or, as Ronald Reagan said, “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.” – Philip Wilt Van Nuys Jobs they won’t do President Bush keeps repeating his slogan about “jobs Americans won’t do.” He must be talking about the president and Congress, who refuse to do their jobs of protecting the Constitution, U.S. sovereignty and the rule of law. Maybe we could hire guest workers to replace them. – Charles K. Sergis Calabasas This was a test Re: “What’s missing?” (Your Opinions, March 20 Mark Dam laments that No Child Left Behind only leaves between 30 and 45 minutes each day to cover every subject besides language arts and math, and then asks if he missed anything. Yes, sir, you did. Testing, and more testing, and still more testing … – Ron Mossler Northridge ——— How to write to us We welcome letters on all issues of public concern. All are subject to editing and condensation, and they can be published only with the writer’s true name. Only the writer’s home community, rather than full address, will be published. Letters must include the writer’s complete home address and daytime telephone number for verification purposes. Please limit letters to 100 words. Letters and columns that are submitted and for which no compensation was paid may be republished in digital and other formats and retained in archives, without compensation to the author. Mail letters to: Public Forum, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365-4200 Fax: (818) 713-3723 E-mail: [email protected] Our Opinions reflect the opinion of the newspaper as an institution. Your Opinions are the personal opinions of readers of the newspaper. Their Opinions express the personal opinion of the writers. dailynews.com For the weekend package of local, state and national columns, editorials and Public Forum, go to Opinions section of dailynews.com. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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28 Dec
2019

Coláiste Ailigh students named as Junk Kouture Regional finalists

first_imgTwo student groups from Coláiste Ailigh Letterkenny have been announced as Regional Finalists for Bank of Ireland Junk Kouture 2017.Lucia McCauley and Imelda Boyle Bank of Ireland Donegal Reps, surprised student designers and models of Coláiste Ailigh, Letterkenny, with two precious Silver Tickets.The students received the Silver Tickets for their entries ‘We’re all mad here’ and ‘Royal Blue.’ Niamh Ni Dhufaigh modeled the “Royal Blue” and worked on it with Helen Ni Chanainn Ni Chanthain..Amy Nic Floinn Ni Chasaide modeled “We’re All Mad Here” and helped on the design with Shannen McGiolla Chearra Ni Phatuin and Caoimhe Ni Dhroma.These tickets secure them a place in the Bank of Ireland Junk Kouture Ulster Regional Final taking place on the 6th March 2017.Junk Kouture – Colaiste AilighNow in its seventh year, the all-Ireland leading fashion and art competition for secondary schools challenges students to create unique, original and innovative outfits from recycled materials and junk. Open to students nationwide, entries for 2017 surpassed all expectations making it the biggest competition to date. 80 designs from each of the four provinces were lucky enough to be Silver Ticket winners.Royal BlueWe’re all mad hereSpeaking about the Silver Tickets, Barry Gallagher, Head of County, Donegal at Bank of Ireland said; “The calibre of entries for this year’s competition has been fantastic and the judging panel had a very tough job choosing the top 80 from each region. With every entry being uniquely choreographed to music, we are really excited to see the models bring their designs to life on stage at the Regional finals. We wish everyone the best of luck with the next stage of the competition and remind finalists to get innovative about how they gather support through the Bank of Ireland Junk Kouture voting app.Junk Kouture – Colaiste AilighAs part of the judging process, the public can get involved by casting a vote for their favourite design through the Bank of Ireland Junk Kouture voting app. Accessed through the BOIStudents Facebook page (www.facebook.com/BOIstudents), voting opens for one week before the regional competitions from Ulster. Individuals can cast a single vote every 24hours. Votes account for 10% of the final mark and can make a huge difference in such a heated competition.Coláiste Ailigh students named as Junk Kouture Regional finalists was last modified: February 14th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Junk Kouture – Colaiste Ailighlast_img read more

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