21 Apr
2021

In the BB archives

first_imgA baker who had a better idea of the value of empty flour sacks than he had of the ethics of stealing was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment at Darlaston. He went to the bakehouse of a neighbour and wanted to buy 21 flour sacks, the value of which was seven shillings. The owner did not wish to sell them, and the prisoner went away, but afterwards, he was seen carrying the sacks from the premises. He was followed to a public house and, when charged with taking them, he expressed surprise that he should be charged with stealing, as the constable had recovered them. His plea, which did not obviate his imprisonment, was that he had been drinking and he did not know what he was doing.last_img

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1 Jan
2021

FairPoint appoints Hauser as new CEO

first_imgConsolidated Communications,FairPoint Communications, Inc. (NYSE: FRP) announced today its Board of Directors has appointed David L. Hauser to the position of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Hauser most recently served as group executive and chief financial officer at Duke Energy Corporation (NYSE: DUK). Hauser has been a member of FairPoint s Board of Directors since February 2005, serving as a director, chairman of the Compensation Committee and a member of the Audit Committee. Hauser, 57, will assume his new responsibilities upon the retirement of FairPoint Chairman and CEO Eugene B. Johnson, effective July 1, 2009. Johnson had earlier indicated his intentions to retire. David s past experience, financial acumen and extensive public company experience will be instrumental in successfully realizing the growth and opportunities that we envision for FairPoint, said Jane E. Bonnie Newman, lead director of FairPoint. He will be passionately focused on customers and shareholders alike.Hauser joined Duke Energy (then Duke Power) in 1973. He held numerous positions throughout the company including senior vice president of global asset development. He also managed the fleet, warehousing and procurement divisions. In June 1998, he was named senior vice president and treasurer. He became acting chief financial officer in November 2003. Hauser was named group vice president and chief financial officer in February 2004 and was named to his most recent position in April 2006. FairPoint is a dynamic, customer-focused organization that can and will respond to the challenges that it faces today, said Hauser. There is no doubt in my mind that we will be successful in the markets we serve, and that our employees will continue to be the driver and backbone of that success.Hauser continued, While it is gratifying to be named chairman and CEO of this longstanding organization, I am very aware of the operational and financial concerns surrounding the company. My primary focus will be to address these concerns in quick succession and empower our team to seek and implement solutions. There is a lot of work to be done, and I am looking forward to getting started. David has done it all, commented Johnson. From operations to finance, there are numerous aspects of the enterprise that he has touched. This, coupled with his experience on FairPoint s Board of Directors, makes him the ideal choice for our new Chairman and CEO. I am thrilled to hand the reigns over to him. As I assume this new role, I offer my thanks to Gene as he was the driving force behind the company s growth for close to 20 years, punctuated by FairPoint s acquisition of the northern New England properties. On behalf of the Board and the employees, I wish to thank Gene for his tireless efforts.A native of High Point, N.C., Hauser graduated from Furman University in South Carolina with a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration. He received a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He completed the Executive Program of Professional Management Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.Hauser serves on the board of EnPro Industries, Inc. He is a member of the boards of trustees of Furman University and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. He is also a member of the Business Advisory Council for the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the North Carolina Association of Certified Public Accountants.About FairPointFairPoint Communications, Inc. is an industry leading provider of communications services to communities across the country. Today, FairPoint owns and operates local exchange companies in 18 states offering advanced communications with a personal touch, including local and long distance voice, data, Internet, television and broadband services. FairPoint is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol FRP. Learn more at www.fairpoint.com(link is external).This press release may contain forward-looking statements by FairPoint that are not based on historical fact, including, without limitation, statements containing the words “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates” and similar expressions and statements. Because these forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, there are important factors that could cause actual results, events or developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Such factors include those risks described from time to time in FairPoint’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including, without limitation, the risks described in FairPoint’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K on file with the SEC. These factors should be considered carefully and readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. All information is current as of the date this press release is issued, and FairPoint undertakes no duty to update this information.Source: FairPoint Communications, Inc., www.fairpoint.com(link is external). CHARLOTTE, N.C. (June 16, 2009)last_img read more

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18 Dec
2020

6 Hazards to Beware of at Long Island Beaches This Summer

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Beachgoers have begun swarming to the shores of Long Island to cool off now that school is out and summer is in, but the region’s favorite pastime isn’t all fun and games.To keep a day at the beach from turning into a trip to the emergency room, swimmers—and in some cases, even sun worshipers who stay on the sand—should be careful of common local hazards ranging from pollution to rip currents.“As we enjoy the start of summer at our beautiful beaches, it’s important for neighbors to recognize the joy of playing in the ocean is accompanied by the potential for danger,” warned Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray.LI’s shores are not alone in giving bathers something to worry about. Florida leads the nation in shark attacks with the Carolinas close behind given the upswing in recent incidents, some California beaches have been cleaning up oil inexplicably washing ashore and the Gulf Coast is still recovering from the BP oil spill five years ago.Although the issues on the Island aren’t as dangerous as shark bites and oil spills, there are still some risks that can roll ashore worth keeping in mind. Here are six:Swimming was prohibited at Lake Ronkonkoma beach due to increased bacteria levels and a blue-green algae bloom advisory on Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Lake Ronkonkoma reopened to swimming on Thursday, July 2, 2015. (Long Island Press photo)A Day At The Petri DishRain doesn’t only keep sunbathers away from the shore when the skies open up, but also can force health officials to temporarily close beaches on sunny days that follow storms.That’s because stormwater runoff washes pathogens—disease-causing bacteria or viruses—into local waterways, which often prompts health officials responsible for testing the water quality to temporarily close affected bathing beaches the day after heavy rains. Bathing in bacteria-contaminated water can result in gastrointestinal illness, as well as infections of the eyes, ears, nose and throat, officials say.Studies have shown that such pollution is the result of stormwater runoff washing domestic and wild animal waste as well as partly treated human waste from septic tanks and sewage treatment plants into LI’s bays, rivers and streams.The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) ranked New York 20th in beach water quality out of 30 states, according to last year’s annual report that examines beach closure data. The ranking by the nonprofit environmental group was the result of 13 percent of samples taken in 2013 exceeding the national Beach Action Value, a system developed by the federal Environmental Protection Agency to test safe levels of bacteria in the water.Also contributing human waste to bathing beaches are some boaters who flush untreated sewage into local bays even though the EPA made doing that illegal when the South Shore Estuary, Peconic Bay Estuary and the Long Island Sound were all deemed a “no discharge zone” five years ago.The public can help keep beaches open and prevent pathogens from entering waterways by disposing of animal waste properly, maintaining septic systems and reminding boaters to use a pump-out station. Before swimming, check local beaches for any posted warnings by calling Nassau County’s beach hotline at 516-227-9700 and/or Suffolk County’s beach hotline at 631-852-5822.Toxic TidesAside from swimmers avoiding pathogens, those who go fishing or clamming in the waters off LI’s shores have another kind of pollution to worry about.Years after industrial sources polluted the waters with heavy metals such as mercury and carcinogens such as PCBs, those and other toxins have been found in fish and shellfish caught off both the north and south shores of LI, studies have shown.“The primary chemicals of concern in New York City waters and Long Island marine waters are PCBs, dioxin and cadmium,” the New York State Department of Health wrote in its pamphlet on eating locally caught fish. “In Long Island freshwaters the primary chemical is chlordane. These chemicals build up in your body over time.”In its advisory, the health department suggests that fishermen and women limit eating fish caught in certain waterways, with extra precautions urged for children and women under 50. Fish caught in water farther offshore is less contaminated, the agency said.Aside from issuing warnings for certain fish caught in Block Island Sound, Gardiners Bay, Jamaica Bay, the South Shore and Peconic Bay, there are also guidelines for freshwater fishing in lakes, ponds and streams around LI, including Freeport Reservoir, Lake Capri, Loft’s Pond, Smith Pond and Fresh Pond.As for clams oysters and other shellfish, the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) issued an emergency closure in May for shellfisheries in Shinnecock Bay after marine biotoxin contamination was found. For the latest advisories, call the DEC’s local shellfish office at 631-444-0480.About 40 volunteers picked up trash on the Montauk beaches collecting everything from shoes and straws to mylar balloons and fishing trash as part of the Surfrider Foundation Clean up on Wednesday, June 17. (Photo credit: Dain Ning)Watch Your StepEven those only going for a long walk on the beach should be careful of debris, as anyone who’s ever stepped on trash buried in the sand at Jones Beach State Park knows too well.Broken glass, rusted metal and fishing line are just some of the garbage that can occasionally be found littering local shores. Not only is it unpleasant for humans to step on such trash, animals are often entangled in discarded ropes and fishing line.“Last year, 56,891 volunteers cleaned and documented 92,677 pounds of debris along 245.52 miles of New York State’s shoreline,” The American Littoral Society said on its website. That total is about the weight of a fully grown sperm whale, which can reach a length of 59 feet.The public can help by disposing of trash properly and volunteering for beach cleanups through the society, The Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation and other environmentally oriented groups.Tens of thousands of dead bunker fish have been washing up along the Peconic River and Flanders Bay due to low dissolved oxygen levels caused by overabundant nitrogen, which fuel brown and red tides. (Photo: Long Island Coastal Conservation Research Alliance Facebook Page)Red Tide is HighLook no further than the mass turtle die-off and back-to-back fish kills that flooded East End waterways with tens of thousands of dead bunker fish last month for proof that red tide is a problem on LI.Officials and experts credited all three events in Flanders Bay to red tide—an overabundance of algae that contributes to the depletion of oxygen in the water and causes a host of other problems. The blooms are caused by nitrogen pollution.“No question the biggest problem is nitrogen in our waters,” said Jim Gilmore, head of the state DEC’s Bureau of Marine Resources. “We have had several occurrences of fish kills but never of this magnitude. And nitrogen exacerbates the problem. We want the fish in the water, not dying on the beaches. Algal blooms fueled by nitrogen are making it worse.”The toxic condition first emerged in LI waters three decades ago and is widely believed to have contributed to—along with overfishing—the collapse of the local shellfishing industry, which is now a shell of its former self.Excess nitrogen leaches into local bays from a combination of sewage treatment plant outflow pipes, stormwater runoff and antiquated septic tanks. The problem is exacerbated in Suffolk County, where 74 percent of homes and businesses still use septic tanks since most of eastern LI isn’t hooked up to the public sewer system.After the recent fish kills, local health officials warned the public not to touch the dead fish. But people should avoid contact with some of the algae blooms as well—notably the blue-green algae and red tide, which contains neurotoxins that can cause paralysis.Pets are also at risk if they drink from water where blue-green algae is present. In 2013, a dog died after drinking water from an East Hampton pond that was contaminated with blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria. Similar fatal incidents have been reported nationwide.Swimming in brown tide, which has been spotted in the South Shore bays this summer, is not known to be harmful. But ingesting water with high amounts of algae can be risky. An NRDC study found that those exposed to certain types of algae might suffer from a variety of symptoms such as neurological complaints, diarrhea, vomiting, respiratory issues as well as skin and eye irritation.To help prevent algae blooms, choose organic compost instead of fertilizer for yard work and gardening.Lion’s Mane jellyfishThe Lion’s DenFew things ruin a day at the beach like a jellyfish sting—especially if the culprit is the Lion’s Mane jellyfish, which is believed to be the world’s largest.These big, bad jellies are native to the North Atlantic and are no strangers to LI waters. This species of jellyfish can grow to as large as 6-feet wide and 49-feet long. Although the lion’s mane jellyfish has a beautiful crimson-colored, bell-shaped head, be warned that these creatures’ tentacles can leave a very painful sting.Take it from this reporter, who’s personally been stung by the lion’s mane: This jellyfish’s sting can lead to hives and blisters. Don’t ignore signs posted on the beach that warn about jellyfish in the waters, and always use caution when swimming. Beware ‘Grip of The Rip’In addition to all of the above-listed hazards, top among them are rip currents.Rip currents are channels of water that are caused by water pressure building up along the shoreline, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).While standing at the water’s edge, swimmers may feel a tugging at their ankles as the water pulls away from shore; this is the undertow. If the pull is strong enough, it can lead to drowning. While an undertow and riptides are dangerous, the number one danger is rip currents, mostly because people have an instinct to swim against it and exhaust themselves to the point of drowning.“When we say beware of the ‘grip of the rip,’ we mean it,” said Hempstead Town Councilman Anthony Santino. “Even the most experienced swimmers can be endangered by rip currents, so it’s imperative to be prepared if a situation arises in the water.”To escape out of a rip current, swimmers should remain calm, swim parallel to the shore and allow the oncoming waves to assist them back to shore. If a swimmer has enough energy, it is strongly advised to signal for help. Always remember to stay within areas that have lifeguards, and don’t swim too far away from shore.Otherwise, have a blast at the beach but don’t forget your sun block.last_img read more

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20 Nov
2020

Facing runoffs, Georgia’s Republican senators ask the state’s top elections official, also a Republican, to step down.

first_imgMr. Raffensperger responded quickly in a statement of his own. “Let me start by saying that is not going to happen,” he said. – Advertisement – Mr. Trump has continued to falsely insist the election was being stolen from him. The move by the senators, who have both been closely aligned with the president, also underscores the infighting taking place among Republicans even as the party braces for a bitter showdown during the January runoffs. Some conservatives fear that impugning the electoral process will depress the vote among Republican voters, who may not turn out if they do not trust the legitimacy of the electoral process. “We believe when there are failures, they need to be called out — even when it’s in your own party,” the senators said in their statement, which did not offer any specific allegations or explain how they believed Mr. Raffensperger had fallen short. “Honest elections are paramount to the foundation of our democracy,” they said. “The Secretary of State has failed to deliver honest and transparent elections. He has failed the people of Georgia, and he should step down immediately.” “Trump is gonna cost the GOP the Senate,” Erick Erickson, a Georgia-based conservative commentator, wrote on Twitter. “His supporters are internalizing that the election in Georgia was stolen so why bother even trying.”In a briefing before the statement was issued on Monday, Gabriel Sterling, the voting system implementation manager for Mr. Raffensperger’s office, sought to debunk the various allegations that had circulated and said the election had run smoothly, despite long lines at times during early voting. He noted that the average wait time to vote on Election Day was two minutes — “that’s unheard of in this state, ever.”“The facts are the facts, regardless of outcomes,” he said, adding, “In this state, this time, this election on Election Day was an amazing success.” – Advertisement – Senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler of Georgia on Monday called for the resignation of the state’s top elections official, Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, as they accused his office of failing to oversee an honest and transparent election without evidence or citing specific concerns. Their extraordinary joint statement on Monday came as a rift among Republicans in Georgia has intensified as Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s lead over President Trump has steadily grown, pushing the president’s supporters to lash out against Mr. Raffensperger, who is a Republican. – Advertisement – “I know emotions are running high,” he added. “Politics are involved in everything right now. If I was Senator Perdue, I’d be irritated I was in a runoff. And both senators and I are all unhappy with the potential outcome for our president.”Mr. Raffensperger said that the process of reporting results had been orderly and followed the law.The results in Georgia have drawn widespread notice and alarmed Republicans, as Mr. Biden is outperforming Mr. Trump by more than 10,000 votes in a state Mr. Trump won in 2016. Both senators have been forced into runoff races against Democrats, contests that could determine control of the Senate.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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19 Oct
2020

Nuclear agency collects more samples in probe into irradiated area in Banten housing complex

first_imgTopics : The Center for Science and Technology Research (Puspitek)  building, which is located about 5 kilometers away from the Batan Indah complex, houses several small reactors used for experimental purposes. Abdul went on to say that a police investigation was under way to determine the party that had dumped radioactive waste in the area.“We’re still awaiting the investigation. Police have started an investigation, while Bapeten has begun collecting information on known users of Caesium-137 across Indonesia,” he said. He said the agency would continue to measure radiation levels and collect soil samples on Thursday. Meanwhile, the decontamination efforts would be postponed until the agency had received the results of the sample examination from PLTR-BATAN, he said.It was previously reported that Bapeten first detected the radiation during a routine check in the residential area to ensure that the agency’s mobile radiation detection unit was working properly.All of the areas showed normal radiation levels, except for a vacant lot next to the volleyball court at Block J of the Batan Indah complex.The agency revealed on Sunday that it had found highly radioactive Caesium-137 materials as the source of radiation in the area. The cause of the incident remains unclear, however, authorities have said that the Caesium-137 did not come from a nuclear reactor leak but rather industrial sources.center_img The Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (Bapeten) has continued efforts to decontaminate an area exposed to high levels of radiation from radioactive Caesium-137 waste in the Batan Indah housing complex in South Tangerang, Banten.Agency spokesperson Abdul Qohhar Teguh said authorities had collected more samples of soil and vegetation from the exposed area and sent them to the National Nuclear Agency’s Center for Radioactive Waste Technology (PLTR-BATAN) for further examination.“We’ve collected 223 drums of soil and vegetation [during] the decontamination efforts as of [Wednesday] afternoon — all of which have been sent to PLTR-BATAN,” Abdul said on Wednesday evening. last_img read more

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19 Sep
2020

PCB wants Afridi to retire gracefully from T20

first_imgFORMER Pakistan captain Shahid Afridi’s long stint in international cricket is going to come to an end with the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) reportedly giving the all-rounder a chance to officially announce his retirement from the game, during the country’s T20 series against West Indies in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) later this month.According to various reports, the PCB wants the 36-year-old to retire from the game and will give the cricketer a chance to say farewell in a dignified manner with plans to pick him for the T20 squad that will face the West Indies.Afridi had previously said he would retire from T20 cricket post the ICC T20 World Cup in India but has retracted his statement claiming he still wants to play the shortest format of the game and is available for selection.“Apparently the board and national selectors don’t agree and feel Afridi should retire gracefully although he can continue playing in the foreign leagues and domestic cricket.The plan is to talk to Afridi and explain to him that since the selectors are now building a new T20 squad for the next World T20, there is no place for him.“He will be offered the chance to be included in the Pakistan squad for the T20 series against the West Indies as 16th player and play in the matches,” a source said, as quoted by the Hindu.The 36-year-old had a rocky time during his last stint as captain. He had to step down post Pakistan’s disastrous campaign in the 2016 T20 World Cup and has not represented his country since then.He has also been repeatedly ignored by the selectors, which is headed by another former captain Inzamam-ul-Haq.Afridi has played 27 Test matches, 398 One Day Internationals (ODIs) and 98 T20 Internationals in a career spanning 20 years. He holds the record for the highest number of sixes hit in the 50-over format with 351 runs to his name.(Yahoo Sport)last_img read more

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18 Sep
2020

Keevin Allicock, Abiola Jackman to be awarded by AIBA

first_img… Blake, Pool, Assanah also to be recognisedKEEVIN Allicock and Abiola Jackman were named by the Guyana Boxing Association (GBA) among five boxers and officials, who will be awarded by International Boxing Association (AIBA) for their achievement and performances in amateur boxing.The Steve Ninvalle-led GBA said AIBA had asked all of its affiliated federations to nominate individuals to be awarded as part of the International body’s observance of International Boxing Day.Abiola JackmanAfter consultation with GBA’s Coaches and Referee and Judges Commission, Allicock, former Junior Commonwealth silver medallist and reigning Caribbean bantamweight champion, along with Jackman, the current female Caribbean Champion, was selected.While Allicock will be recognised as the country’s best Elite boxer and Jackman the best Youth female fighter, Mark Crawford will be awarded for being the best Youth male boxer.The Best Coach award will go to Sebert Blake; Best Official is Terrence Poole and Lawrence Assanah, a Sergeant in the Guyana Defence Force (GDF) who recently picked up his AIBA One Star badge, will be recognised for his excellence in the ring as a referee.AIBA designated July 22 to be celebrated every year and encourages the global Boxing Family, fans, partners and stakeholders to join in celebrating.Leading up to the July 22 event this year, AIBA took the initiative to inspire the global boxing community, through sharing the greatest boxing stories and organising quizzes to challenge all boxing fans and supporters.last_img read more

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