2 Mar
2021

Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Releases Soundboard From Colorado’s 1st Bank Center

first_img[Photo: Andrew Rios]Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | 1st Bank Center | Broomfield, CO | 4/29/2017Set One (8:39PM – 10:17PM): Shelter From The Storm @ (TH) -> Bertha > Let It Grow -> No Quarter Jam # -> Help On The Way > Slipknot! $ > Throwing Stones, Must Have Been Roses, Gonesville % (SM) -> Shakedown Street ^Set Two (10:45PM – 12:53AM)&&: Morfbeats & -> Space *-> Dark Star + -> Half Step -> Estimated Prophet -> Terrapin Suite > The Other One > Eyes Of The World @@Encore One: One More Saturday Night -> Cold Rain & Snow Jam ## -> One More Saturday Night Reprise ##, Not Fade Away $$ -> Tequila Jam -> Not Fade Away RepriseEncore Two: Ripple, Born To Run %%Notes:@ – Bob Dylan Cover, First Time Played by Almost Dead# – Not played by Almost Dead since The Belly Up, Aspen, CO, 2016-07-02, a gap of 32 shows$ – With a “Duo Jam”% – Bob Weir cover, from “Blue Mountain”, First Time Played by Almost Dead^ – With short China Cat & Cold Rain & Snow Jams (Band)& – Kind of a Drums -> Space Hybrid, with Joe, Adam Morford, Billy Martin & John Medeski, playing crazy percussion instruments created & built by Adam Morford on a riser behind Joe’s kit. Eventually Marco, Tommy, Dave & Scott joined in & the segment evolved into Space. First Time Played by Almost Dead.&& – Entire second set from Space on & encore with Stuart Bogie on Sax, flute & clarinet.* – With John Medeski on percussion & then Hammond Organ and Billy Martin & Adam Morford on Percussion+ – With John Medeski on Hammond Organ and Billy Martin & Adam Morford on [email protected]@ – With a tease of what I think was a Tears for Fears tune (TH)## – First Time Played by Almost Dead$$ – With Black Throated Wind teases (SM), Chuckles (WOLF) Teases (SM) and a “Duo Jam”%% – Played with the house lights on Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s Taper Tuesday is upon us yet again. For the 39th installment of the series, the group has just released the soundboards from the Grateful Dead ensemble’s arena debut at the 1st Bank Center in Broomfield, Colorado, back at the end of April. While originally scheduled for Almost Dead’s Red Rocks debut, following dangerous weather conditions, the group had to suddenly change their plans, leading to their performance at the 1st Bank.Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Details Rescheduled Red Rocks ShowSupported by Medeski, Martin, & Wood, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead still had some special surprises planned for the night, including a massive collaborative “Drums/Space” > “Dark Star” to open the second set, which saw John Medeski, Billy Martin, Adam Morford (Morfbeats), and Stuart Bogie join the group ahead of a tight second set housing a massive “Terrapin Suite.” The night also saw the group debut covers of Bob Dylan’s “Shelter From The Storm” and Bob Weir’s “Gonesville” during their first set, and during a surprise second encore, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead closed out their show with the house lights up while debuting Bruce Springsteen’s “Born To Run” (following Joe Russo’s announcement, “Now, for something completely different”). You can check out the official soundboard from Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s 1st Bank performance below, as well as Live For Live Music’s full recap of the night.Now For Something Completely Different: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s Spectacular Arena Debut last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

Following path of genetic footprint

first_imgAn international team of researchers studying DNA patterns from modern and archaic humans has uncovered new clues about the movement and intermixing of populations more than 40,000 years ago in Asia.Using state-of-the-art genome analysis methods, scientists from Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have found that Denisovans — a recently identified group of archaic humans whose DNA was extracted last year from a finger bone excavated in Siberia — contributed DNA not just to present-day New Guineans, but also to aboriginal Australian and Philippine populations.The study demonstrates that contrary to the findings of the largest previous genetic studies, modern humans settled Asia in more than one migration. According to David Reich, a professor of genetics at HMS, “Denisova DNA is like a medical imaging dye that traces a person’s blood vessels. It is so recognizable that you can detect even a little bit of it in one individual. In a similar way, we were able to trace Denisova DNA in the migrations of people. This shows the power of sequencing ancient DNA as a tool for understanding human history.”The patterns the researchers found can only be explained by at least two waves of human migration: the first giving rise to the aboriginal populations that currently live in Southeast Asia and Oceania, and later migrations giving rise to relatives of East Asians who now are the primary population of Southeast Asia.The study also provides new insights about where the ancient Denisovans lived. According to Mark Stoneking, a professor at the Max Planck Institute who is senior author of the paper, Denisovans must have inhabited an extraordinarily large ecological and geographic range, from Siberia to tropical Southeast Asia. “The fact that Denisovan DNA is present in some aboriginal populations of Southeast Asia but not in others shows that there was a checkerboard of populations with and without Denisova material more than 44,000 years ago,” he said. “The presence of Denisovan genetic material in some but not all the groups there can most easily be explained if Denisovans lived in Southeast Asia itself.”The findings appear on Sept. 22 in The American Journal of Human Genetics.This research builds on previous work by Reich and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute, in which they analyzed an ancient pinky bone uncovered by Russian archaeologists in the Siberian Denisova Cave in 2008. The Max Planck Institute team led by Svante Pääbo sequenced the bone’s nuclear genome, and Reich led the population genetic analysis using algorithms that he and colleagues developed.Reporting December 2010 in Nature, the team identified Denisovans as a distinct group of archaic humans (hominins) who lived more than 30,000 years ago and contributed genes to present-day New Guineans. The researchers concluded that Denisovans were neither Neanderthals nor early modern humans, though they shared a common ancestry.This paper helped fill in some empty pieces in the evolutionary puzzle that began after early humans left Africa and reinforces the view that humans have intermixed throughout history.Genetic footprintsThe new study was initiated by Stoneking, an expert on genetic variation in Southeast Asia and Oceania who has assembled diverse samples from that region. The study takes a closer look at the Denisovans’ genetic footprint. The researchers analyzed DNA from dozens of present-day populations in Southeast Asia and Oceania, including Borneo, Fiji, Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Polynesia. Some of the data already existed, and some were newly collected for the study.Their analysis shows that, in addition to New Guineans, Denisovans contributed genetic material to Australian aborigines, a Philippine “Negrito” group called Mamanwa, and several other populations in eastern Southeast Asia and Oceania. However, groups in the west or northwest, including other Negrito groups such as the Onge in the Andaman Islands and the Jehai in Malaysia, as well as mainland East Asians, did not interbreed with Denisovans.The researchers concluded that:• Denisovans interbred with modern humans in Southeast Asia at least 44,000 years ago before the time of the separation of the Australians and New Guineans.• Southeast Asia was first colonized by modern humans unrelated to present-day Chinese and Indonesians, and that these and other East Asians arrived in later migrations. This “southern route” hypothesis has previously been supported by archaeological evidence, but has never had strong genetic support.Investigators from the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Germany, India, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, and the Netherlands also contributed. This study was funded by the Max Planck Society and the National Science Foundation HOMINID program.last_img read more

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19 Sep
2020

The Latest: Switzerland soccer players decline payments

first_imgThe Latest: Switzerland soccer players decline payments Formula One says it will furlough half of its staff until the end of May and senior executives will take pay cuts amid the coronavirus pandemic.F1 has postponed eight races so far this season and the Monaco Grand Prix has been canceled.F1 says senior leadership figures will take “voluntary pay cuts while still continuing to work and not in furlough.”CEO Chase Carey will take a “much deeper” pay cut.The McLaren and Williams teams had already put some staff on furlough schemes. McLaren drivers Lando Norris and Carlos Sainz have also taken pay cuts. April 8, 2020 He says “like all businesses we are tremendously affected by the COVID-19 crisis.”He says he is dealing with 150 contracts that are games-related but adds “we have no plans to let any staff go at the moment.”___The track world championships in Eugene, Oregon, have been rescheduled for July 15-24, 2022.The event was pushed back a year because the Tokyo Olympics were delayed until 2021 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Associated Press ___The president of the International Paralympic Committee says the body has “cash-flow” problems because of the Olympic and Paralympic postponement until 2021.Andrew Parsons says about 5% of spending is being cut from the IPC’s budget. A 2018 financial report showed a budget of 24 million euros ($25.7 million).Parsons says the problem was due partly to broadcast rights holders who want to delay their payments until the product is delivered.Parsons says it’s not a question of “losing money” but rather some temporary belt tightening. The team was scheduled to play in the now-postponed European Championship in June and had two games in Qatar canceled last month because of the coronavirus pandemic.The shutdown of games has cost the Swiss soccer body millions of dollars.Federation chairman Dominique Blanc says it’s a “magnificent gesture” from the players.Blanc tested positive for the virus three weeks ago.Team captain Stephan Lichtsteiner says “we wanted to set an example and show solidarity.” The season is currently scheduled to begin in France on June 28. F1 management has said it still hopes to hold between 15 and 18 races this year in place of the original 22.___A two-time Olympic finalist in the 800 meters has died after getting infected with the coronavirus.The Italian Olympic Committee says Donato Sabia has died. He was 56.CONI says he is the first Italian Olympian to die with the virus. The track worlds were originally scheduled for Aug. 6-15, 2021.World Athletics president Sebastian Coe says 2022 will be a “bonanza for athletics fans around the world” with the Commonwealth Games beginning in Birmingham, England, only three days after the track worlds.The 2022 Commonwealth Games are scheduled for July 27-Aug. 7 and the multisport European Championship is currently slated for Aug. 11-21 in Munich.World Athletics has also postponed the bidding processes for 2023 World Athletics Series events. They will now open in November 2020.___ Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___The players and coach on Switzerland’s national soccer team have declined to take more than 1 million Swiss francs ($1.03 million) of payments that were due from their federation in 2020. Sabia finished fifth in the 800 at the 1984 Los Angeles Games and seventh at the 1988 Seoul Games. He also won the 800 at the 1984 European Indoor Championships.Sabia died in his hometown of Potenza in southern Italy shortly after his father also died from the virus.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6last_img read more

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16 Sep
2020

Praise for Darnold continues as USC turns to Arizona

first_imgBenjamin Dunn | Daily TrojanCatch me if you can · Redshirt freshman quarterback Sam Darnold has frustrated opposing defenses with his scrambling ability. Head coach Clay Helton attributed some of his elusiveness to practicing against good players.The sense of deflation that followed the Trojans during their slow season opening is nowhere to be found now, as players took to Howard Jones Field on Wednesday looking to keep moving up with a win over Arizona in Tucson this weekend.Winging ItHead coach Clay Helton continued to discuss the playmaking ability of redshirt freshman quarterback Sam Darnold, as the mobile signal caller has impressed with his ability to invent while scrambling since taking over the starting job.“That’s something that comes when you have an athletic kid back there who can move around and create,” Helton said, speaking about Darnold’s improvised fumble-touchdown last weekend. “We’ve created some first downs because of it.”If USC looks comfortable when things break down in-game, it’s because the Trojans get a great deal of practice on scramble drills during the week. Helton credited the defense’s ability to get pressure on Darnold as the reason the young quarterback has quickly learned to remain productive on the run.“It comes about when you’re going good [players] on good [players],” Helton said. “We’re getting them naturally, and he’s doing a really nice job of maneuvering around in the pocket and knowing when to break contain.”A Wrinkle in the Pass RushAnother freshman making strides as the season progresses is defensive end Oluwole Betiku Jr., who head coach Clay Helton said would take on an increased role in the coming weeks.“We’re playing these teams that … could play anywhere from 80-100 plays in a game. We need that third-down pass rush, and [Betiku] gives it to us,” he said. “We saw the light click on for him over the last two weeks, and we’ve decided to pull the trigger and allow him to help us on third down — and he’ll mix in hopefully on some special teams.”And while the Trojan coaching staff hopes Betiku will terrorize whichever quarterback starts for Arizona on Saturday, Helton insisted the young lineman would be eased into the game plan.“Even though he looks like a 30-year-old man, he’s a true freshman, and he’s learning a pro-style system with [defensive coordinator] Clancy [Pendergast],” Helton laughed. “We haven’t given him the entire package — he’s not entirely ready for first and second down — but to be able to cut him loose … we think is advantageous.”No SurprisesThough the Trojans are unsure who will be at quarterback for the Wildcats, they have been dissecting Arizona’s offensive tendencies throughout the week to prepare defensively. But whether it’s Brandon Dawkins or Khalil Tate under center this weekend, USC knows it will be up against a speed demon.“Electric,” Helton said of both players. “These two guys are elite runners in our mind.”Not only are Wildcat quarterbacks fast, but they also aren’t afraid to show it, as Arizona is only behind Heisman candidate Lamar Jackson and Louisville in team quarterback rushing yards. This creates many big-play opportunities, which Pendergast was on-guard for during practice.“They’re very unique in the way they use their run-pass options with the vertical passing game, which obviously gives people a lot of problems, and they execute very well,” he said. “They’re very high-level, they’ve been in that system for a few years now, and they know it well, and you can see by the way they execute.”last_img read more

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