12 Jun
2021

Disinform, amplify and intimidate: attacking press freedom online

first_img Organisation Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms PredatorsFreedom of expressionInternet Related documents predators_online_final.pdfPDF – 2.49 MB Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms PredatorsFreedom of expressionInternet Narendra Modi, Vladimir Putin, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi and Xi Jinping – all of these press freedom predators have understood the advantages to be gained from amplifying their propaganda and discrediting journalism on social networks, leading to new forms of censorship.RSF has devised an infographic that analyses the step-by-step strategy and the human and technical resources that are deployed to this end. Disinformation campaigns are amplified by the troll armies created by these authoritarian regimes. They are often helped by unscrupulous companies that sell them fake accounts and bots – programmes that automatically circulate content on social networks.Once the propaganda messages have been widely disseminated – which has the effect of drowning out reliable journalist content – the troll armies unleash cyber-attacks against independent websites and the personal accounts of independent journalists in order to discredit and silence them. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is investigating and analyzing the way press freedom’s predators have managed to adapt their traditional and authoritarian practices to new technology. Bots, fake accounts, email bombing…which methods are being used by these regimes online? center_img News RSF_en April 12, 2018 Disinform, amplify and intimidate: attacking press freedom online Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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17 Oct
2020

Governor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget Address

first_img Budget News,  Remarks,  Videos Pennsylvania State CapitolHarrisburg, PATRANSCRIPT:I. A Commonwealth in crisisLieutenant Governor Stack, Speaker Turzai, President Scarnati. . .Leader Corman, Leader Costa, Leader Reed, Leader Dermody, members of the General Assembly…Members of the judiciary, members of the cabinet, the auditor general, the attorney general, the treasurer, and my wife, Frances…Most importantly, my fellow Pennsylvanians:This will not be an ordinary Governor’s budget address.Usually, this speech is an opportunity to lay out an ambitious agenda for the year ahead.Under ordinary circumstances, I would outline my 2016-17 budget proposal, a proposal full of ideas to move our Commonwealth forward.I would talk about new measures I’m proposing to ensure that every child in Pennsylvania has a world-class education that starts before kindergarten and goes all the way through college.I would talk about the new partnerships we can create between the public and private sectors to help create jobs and grow our economy.I would talk about new innovations that can build on the progress we’ve already made in modernizing our state government so that it costs less and works better.And I would talk about some long-overdue steps we can take to help our Commonwealth fulfill the promise of equal opportunity and economic security for all: including protections for the LGBT community in housing and the workplace, the legalization of medical marijuana, a raise in the minimum wage, and criminal justice reform that will bring fairness back to our system and save tax dollars.But I can’t give that speech. Not under these circumstances.My fellow Pennsylvanians: Our Commonwealth is in crisis. A crisis that threatens our future.And today, I want to be clear – with each member of the General Assembly, and with every Pennsylvanian – about the actions we must take to resolve this crisis, and the consequences we will all face if we don’t.II. This is about mathFirst, let’s be very clear about the nature of the problem.The problem is not that Republicans in the General Assembly and I don’t see eye-to-eye.After all, Pennsylvanians are used to seeing political leaders disagree, even strongly. And in the 2014 election, they chose divided government: a Democratic Governor, a Republican legislature. I doubt anyone was surprised when it turned out that we had different priorities.No, this crisis is not about politics at all.This is about math.Pennsylvania now faces a $2 billion budget deficit.That’s not a Democratic fact or a Republican fact. It’s just a fact.It’s a fact supported by Standard and Poor’s – an independent rating agency. They have done the math. And they agree: Pennsylvania faces a massive structural deficit that will only continue to grow if we fail to address it responsibly.This deficit isn’t just a cloud hanging over Pennsylvania’s long-term future. It is a time bomb, ticking away, right now, even as I speak.If it explodes – if the people in this chamber allow it to explode – then Pennsylvania will experience a fiscal catastrophe the likes of which we have never seen.Please understand: We are not talking about a long-term budget projection. We are talking about Pennsylvania failing to meet its basic obligations – this year. We are talking about pain that will be felt across our Commonwealth. This year.If the General Assembly does not approve a responsible plan to solve this crisis, every Pennsylvanian will suffer the consequences. Those consequences will be real. They will be immediate. They will be severe.Nearly three-quarters of Pennsylvania homeowners will see their already-too-high property taxes skyrocket even further.If a member of this body were to stand up and propose a massive property tax increase, he or she would be booed off the floor by Democrats and Republicans alike.But in fact, that is exactly what will happen if we do not act.We have seen this play out over the last four years. Since 2011, school districts have been forced to increase local property taxes by $1.2 billion, and all because of Harrisburg’s irresponsibility.In the last year alone, 83 school districts increased property taxes above the index because Harrisburg didn’t produce a responsible budget, and another 175 school districts are contemplating additional tax increases this year – for the same reason.This tax shifting is not sustainable, and it will only continue to squeeze families and seniors if we do not stop passing the buck on to local communities.Meanwhile, even as Pennsylvanians will pay more, they will get less from their state government. Far less.For example: Our education system, already threadbare after years of underfunding at the state level, will take a ruinous hit.· Thousands of teachers will be laid off. Guidance and career counselors will be handed pink slips, as well. In all, more than 23,000 education professionals will be immediately yanked out of Pennsylvania schools.· Across Pennsylvania, already-crowded classrooms will become even more so. Class sizes will balloon by 30 percent to account for all those teacher layoffs. Worse, the consequences will not be evenly distributed – classroom crowding will be more severe in the schools that can least afford it. But all across our Commonwealth, our children will receive less attention, less instructional time, less opportunity to gain the skills we need them to have in the 21st century.· Technical education programs will be cut. Special education programs will be cut. Head Start programs will be cut.· And tens of thousands of Pennsylvania children will lose access to pre-kindergarten, depriving them of early childhood education that we know is key to their future success.This is not a threat. This is not political posturing. This is simply what the math tells us will happen if this crisis is not resolved. This is the reality that teachers, and parents, and children in our Commonwealth will face if the General Assembly does not act.And the damage will not be limited to our schools. Basic state services will also face devastating cuts.· We will lose nearly $200 million in services to Pennsylvania seniors including prescription drug assistance and home and community based services. Pennsylvania seniors who depend on that assistance will be forced to pay more out of pocket. Some will have to choose between paying for groceries and paying for the medicine that keeps them alive. These are our elderly parents and neighbors, and they are counting on this funding to pay for the medicine they need. But if we don’t have a budget, we can’t help.· We will lose $180 million in assistance for people living with mental illness or intellectual disabilities. These Pennsylvanians are the most vulnerable among us, and they are counting on our help to live a full life and contribute to their communities. But if we don’t have a budget, they will be denied significant opportunities to improve their lives.· We will lose $40 million in state funding for child care, and thus forfeit nearly $50 million in federal matching funds, for a total cut of nearly $90 million. Hundreds of thousands of working parents are counting on our help to have some peace of mind and the ability to earn the living upon which they raise their families. But if we don’t have a budget, 211,000 Pennsylvania children will have nowhere to go.· We will lose $11.5 million in funding for domestic violence shelters and rape crisis centers. Survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault rely on these safe havens to have somewhere to go in the midst of unthinkable pain and unspeakable terror. But if we don’t have a budget, those shelters and crisis centers will have to shut their doors to the people who need them.Critical programs such as these make up nearly three-quarters of our human services budget.Simply put: the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania cannot meet its obligations to its citizens if the General Assembly does not meet its obligation to pass a responsible budget.And while my Administration will always strive to tackle fraud and be as efficient as possible, even these harsh new cuts – cuts that will harm single mothers, seniors on fixed incomes, and those who are down on their luck – will not solve our crisis.Indeed, anyone in this Chamber who claims we can simply cut our way out of this mess without also increasing revenue is just ignoring the math. They’re also ignoring history. If we don’t have sustainable revenue sources in our budget, the result will be billions of dollars in new property tax hikes.Pennsylvanians need to prepare for these consequences. And I do not say this with any joy whatsoever.But someone in Harrisburg has to start telling the people of Pennsylvania the truth about the mess we’re in.III. What hasn’t workedBefore I ran for Governor, I ran a business. And in challenging times, I know that you can be fiscally responsible while still looking out for the people you serve. These values are not mutually exclusive; they are closely linked.And if you’re in business, and the numbers don’t add up, you can’t ignore the problem, or spin it, or wish it away.You have to take a clear-eyed look at how the problem arose, and then you have to solve it. And fast. Or you won’t be in business very long.Pennsylvania businesses don’t have the luxury of pretending their problems don’t exist. Neither do Pennsylvania families sitting around the kitchen table trying to make ends meet.And the truth is, neither do we here in Harrisburg.So let’s be honest about where we are and how we got here. After all, this fiscal crisis didn’t appear from out of nowhere. This was no act of God. We are in a hole we dug ourselves, right here in Harrisburg. And if the consequences I’m describing sound familiar, it’s because Pennsylvania has been building up to this moment for years.For years, our leaders tried to balance our state budget on the backs of our children and our schools. When I took office, Pennsylvania ranked near the bottom of the country in the percentage of state-level K-12 investment. The burden of funding our schools fell on our local communities. And that, in turn, meant huge spikes in property taxes for Pennsylvania homeowners.That’s a bad way to solve a budget problem. But it’s a great way to create an education problem.We were left with tens of thousands of teachers laid off and crowded classrooms across most of our school districts.And that was just part of the problem. You see, even these huge cuts to education weren’t enough to balance the budget. But instead of finding a sustainable way to deal with our deficit, Harrisburg chose to paper over the problem with a series of budgetary gimmicks and quick fixes.Maybe you can get away with that for a little while. But sooner or later, the rent is due.And if folks here in Harrisburg thought this sleight of hand was a real solution to our budget problem, then the only people they were fooling were themselves. Because nobody else bought it.The three major ratings agencies – Fitch, Moody’s, and Standard and Poor’s – have each downgraded our credit, a total of five times over the last five years. Our credit has actually been downgraded three times in the last two years alone.And each time, the ratings agencies have explained that the downgrades are a direct result of these little tricks Pennsylvania has employed to avoid facing up to the reality of its fiscal situation.When Harrisburg doesn’t take our budget problem seriously, the folks who rate our credit stop taking Harrisburg seriously.Today, because of years of budgetary irresponsibility, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is considered to be among the least creditworthy states in America. This is embarrassing. But embarrassment isn’t the point.You see, because our credit has been downgraded so much, we are forced to pay a higher rate of interest on our $17 billion in debt. That will eventually cost us an extra $139 million a year.That’s $139 million that doesn’t go to improving our schools, or making our business environment more competitive, or lowering our taxes. It’s a $139 million penalty that the people of Pennsylvania pay for Harrisburg’s fiscal irresponsibility.IV. We had a dealThat’s how we got here. And it’s why, when I took office last year, I proposed a different kind of budget.Instead of shortchanging our schools, I proposed a historic commitment to education – beginning to restore the $1 billion that had been cut from our schools under the previous administration, making new investments in early childhood education and community colleges, increasing our state’s share of funding for public schools, and directing more of that funding to districts that needed it the most.And instead of using sleight of hand to avoid dealing with our deficit, I proposed a serious plan to balance our budget and set us on a more sustainable course.No more gimmicks. No more quick fixes. A new approach in Harrisburg. A fresh start for Pennsylvania.Now, I expected that Republicans wouldn’t agree with everything in my proposed budget.What I didn’t expect was what I got: a budget that didn’t even balance.Incredibly, the budget they sent me relied on the same gimmicks and quick fixes that had gotten us in trouble in the first place – $1.5 billion worth of optical illusions that would have made our actual budget problem even worse.If you were running a business, and you took a budget like this to your banker, you would be laughed out of the room. But Pennsylvania’s creditors don’t have a sense of humor about this sort of thing. And neither should we.While I was disappointed by the Republicans’ proposal, I wasn’t discouraged.So I came to the table ready to talk. Ready to negotiate. Ready to compromise.It took months of bargaining. It took some painful sacrifices from both sides. But in the end, all that hard work paid off. We had a deal.The compromise budget I worked out with members of this legislature last year included some of what I wanted – including a historic investment in our schools – but not everything. It included some of what Republicans wanted – including historic changes to our pension and liquor systems – but not everything.And I continue to believe we should solve these decades old problems.We still need changes that provide taxpayers savings and stability in our pension plans, and we need to bring our liquor system into the 21st century.However, these improvements by themselves are not magic bullets, and changes in these two programs will not alone mitigate the consequences of a continued failure to acknowledge the basic math problem we face.Again, the compromise budget included these Republican priorities. But most important of all, the compromise budget was balanced. It solved the financial problem. Passing it into law would defuse the fiscal time bomb and set us on a more sustainable course.It passed the Senate with a majority of both Democrats and Republicans, and had bipartisan support in the House.All that remained was a final vote before I could sign it into law and we could finally move forward.I was ready, pen in hand.And then House Republican leaders just…walked away.They walked away from the table and went home for the holidays without holding that final vote. They still have not held that final vote. And because of that, we still don’t have a budget.But we still have a budget crisis. That fiscal time bomb is still ticking.Our teachers hear it. Our parents hear it. Our seniors hear it. Our creditors certainly hear it.Do you?But the time for games is over. And now it’s time to finish the job we should have finished last year.V. We can’t keep diggingNow, look. Arguments over policy priorities are healthy. Democracy entails disagreement. Compromise is hard.But we had those arguments. We worked out our disagreements. We reached a compromise. Republicans and Democrats sitting in this chamber right now sat at a table with me and did the hard work to find common ground.We had a deal. And then the House Republican leaders walked away.Only in Harrisburg could that be seen as an acceptable way to do business.But you know what? I’m not interested in the inner workings of the Republican caucus. I’m not interested in the politics of any of this.This isn’t about politics.Once again, this is about math.And so here’s what’s really frustrating: When some Republican leaders bailed on our agreement, I was handed yet another budget where the numbers didn’t add up – a budget that would cut another $95 million from our schools, a budget that would zero out funding increases for our institutions of higher education, and, worst of all, a budget that still didn’t balance.We are sitting at the bottom of a $2 billion hole. It is simply unbelievable that some folks in this chamber want to keep digging.I can accept that we disagree about the importance of education. I can accept that we disagree about the proper role of government in securing a more prosperous future for our Commonwealth. And I can accept that I won’t get my way on everything.But I can’t accept – Pennsylvania can’t afford – another irresponsible budget that ignores the fact of this fiscal crisis and pretends our problems don’t exist.I didn’t run for this office to be party to the corner-cutting and budget gimmickry that got us into this mess. We can’t afford to play political games while this crisis is casting a dark shadow on our future. There is simply too much at stake.The train has been careening down the tracks for years. Now the moment of impact has arrived. And whether or not we crash is up to the people in this chamber.It’s up to the people in this chamber to save our children, our seniors, our most vulnerable populations from bearing the brunt of devastating cuts.It’s up to the people in this chamber to save our taxpayers from getting handed the bills Harrisburg wasn’t responsible enough to pay.It’s up to the people in this chamber to save Pennsylvania’s future.It’s time for the people in this chamber to get back to work.VI. The path forwardThe good news is that I still have my pen. And we still have a budget that reflects months of hard work and honest negotiation, a budget that has been approved by bipartisan majorities in both chambers of our legislature, a budget that averts this fiscal catastrophe and gives us a chance at a fresh start.We can get it done. Send that compromise budget to my desk, and we can put our Commonwealth on more secure footing than it has been in years.But let me be very, very clear with each of you in this chamber: We are going to have to stop playing games with our fiscal future. We are going to have to stop closing our eyes and hoping our problems go away. We are going to have to face facts.So do not send me another budget full of gimmicks that are too cute by half. Do not send me another budget where the numbers simply don’t add up.I will not be amused. I will not be fooled. I will not be convinced that dime-store magic tricks are a substitute for a real, responsible budget.And, more importantly, neither will our creditors. Nor the people of Pennsylvania.If you can’t agree to the budget reforms I’ve proposed, then help me find a sustainable alternative.But if you won’t face up to the reality of the situation we’re in. . . if you ignore that time bomb ticking. . . if you won’t take seriously your responsibility to the people of Pennsylvania – then find another job.Because this is not the time for denial, this is not the time for obstruction. This is the time for leaders to come together and honestly, and sincerely, take on the crisis we are facing.Because if we do not solve this crisis, whatever partisan gain you think you may win will be dwarfed by the enormous losses our state will suffer. Nobody in Pennsylvania will care one iota about the politics of a disaster that costs our Commonwealth so much.I refuse to let that happen. But I cannot stop this catastrophe alone. The people of Pennsylvania need you to do the right thing.VII. ConclusionI am not asking people in this chamber to give up their political beliefs. I am asking that they join me in mustering the political courage to meet this crisis head-on.I am asking that they do their job – and live up to their promise to uphold the constitution made when they were elected to serve in the General Assembly.This doesn’t require anyone to walk away from his or her principles. It merely requires that we each declare that our highest principle is the responsibility each of us has to the people of Pennsylvania.The people of Pennsylvania deserve schools that teach, jobs that pay, and a government that works for them.They deserve leaders who are willing to work hard and sacrifice to build a better Commonwealth – because that’s what the people of Pennsylvania do every day to build a better life for their families.Their strength, their resilience, their spirit illuminates our path forward, and gives me hope that when I stand in this chamber to give my budget address next year, it will be under happier circumstances.After all, I ran for this office because I believed deeply in our Commonwealth; in our spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship; in our longstanding tradition of tackling our challenges and seizing our opportunities with boldness and courage; integrity and honesty; in our potential to build a future as bright and prosperous as our past.I know that many of you entered public service for the same reasons. And last December, a number of Republicans and Democrats came together to prove that there are leaders in this body who can put their differences aside and get things done.After a year as Governor, despite the overwhelming challenge we now face, I still believe in Pennsylvania. The possibilities before us are still limitless. A bright future is still within our grasp.I still believe in the enormous potential of our Commonwealth.And I’m counting on everyone in this chamber to do the right thing so we can fulfill that potential.I’m ready to do the hard work to build a brighter future for Pennsylvania. I hope you’re ready to join me.Thank you and God Bless the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. You can find updates and behind-the-scenes content on the 2016-2017 budget announcement on our Facebook and Twitter all this week.Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget Address February 09, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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26 Aug
2020

NHL playoffs 2019: Blue Jackets stun Lightning in Game 1; Seth Jones nets game-winner

first_imgJones’ goal capped off the first comeback of three or more goals against Tampa Bay all season that included goals by Nick Foligno, David Savard and Josh Anderson. The game kicked off with Alex Killorn’s shorthanded breakaway goal and the Lightning were up 3-0 just 17 minutes and 50 seconds into the game.Three goals and 17 saves from netminder Sergei Bobrovsky later, the Blue Jackets had the all-important road win and a 1-0 series lead on the Presidents’ Trophy winners. Torts on Bobrovsky: “We don’t have a chance unless he plays the way he played the last 40.”— Pierre LeBrun (@PierreVLeBrun) April 11, 2019Game 2 from Tampa Bay gets going at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, April 12. Game 1 of the 2019 Stanley Cup playoffs first-round matchup between the Tampa Bay Lightning and Columbus Blue Jackets seemed to be over at the first intermission.However, Columbus clawed its way back and Seth Jones fired the wrist shot past Andrei Vasilevskiy with the man advantage to seal the 4-3 comeback win. The defenseman now has two postseason goals in his career to go along with 10 assists in 18 career games.last_img read more

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12 Aug
2020

USA triumph for Sammy Fuller

first_img England girl international Sammy Fuller has just scored a record-breaking fourth straight win at the Honda Junior Classic in Florida, USA. Sammy, from Roehampton in Surrey, beat Thailand’s Kanyanat Saithip by a stroke to win the girls’ 14-15-year age group.  She scored 77, 73, in tough conditions on the Arnold Palmer course at the PGA National in West Palm Beach. The result continues Sammy’s remarkable run of success in US golf tournaments, achieved during annual winter trips to Florida. The 14-year-old has won her age group in the Honda Junior Classic in each of the last three years and, during last year’s trip, she notched up her sixth consecutive win in the Pars Florida International Junior Championship. Sammy’s younger sister Annabell, 11, (Roehampton) is also making her mark – she was the runner-up in the 10-11-year age group at the Honda Junior Classic.  In addition another Surrey player, Martha Lewis, 13 (St George’s Hill), was third in the 12-13-year age group. Martha was runner-up in the 2013 English U13 championship. Sammy trains with England Golf’s national girls’ squad while Annabell and Martha are both members of the regional U16 South Squad. During this winter’s trip Sammy, together with English boy champion Ben Amor (Marlborough), will represent England Golf in the prestigious Junior Orange Bowl at Biltmore Golf Club, Florida, on 27–30 December. 16 Dec 2013 USA triumph for Sammy Fuller last_img read more

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3 Aug
2020

Hawks, Heat faceoff in KIJHL Final

first_imgThe Beaver Valley Nitehawks will meet the Chase Heat to determine the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Champion after the Hawks and Heat outlasted Kimberley and Osoyoos in deciding Conference Final games Friday.Beaver Valley scored four times in the opening frame to dump Kimberley Dynamiters 5-2 in the Kootenay Conference fifth game.Tyler Ghirardosi got the party started for the home fans with two goals seven minutes into the first period.Devon Langelaar stopped the bleeding with a goal two minutes later.However, Ghirardosi, with his third of the period, and Dylan Heppler scored before the period concluded to give the Hawks the early lead. Beaver Valley then rode the netminding of Tallon Kramer to a berth in the KIJHL final which begins Monday in Fruitvale.Meanwhile, the Heat completed the comeback in Game five at Osoyoos.Two second period goals by Kaden Black and Zachary Fournier powered Chase past the Coyotes.Osoyoos won the first two games of the series.However, the Heat won two games in overtime at home before pulling off the shocker in the South Okanagan City.Game two of the KIJHL Final best-of-five series goes Tuesday before the series shifts to Chase for Games three and four, Thursday and Friday.If necessary, Game five is Sunday, April 2, in Fruitvale.The KIJHL Champion represent the league at the Cyclone Taylor Cup April 6-9, 2017 in Creston.last_img read more

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2 Aug
2020

LONGTIME SPORTS WRITER, RACING PUBLICIST & THOROUGHBRED OWNER, JACK DISNEY PASSES AT AGE 80

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (July 1, 2015)–Jack Disney, a longtime sports writer with the now-defunct Los Angeles Herald Examiner, who went on to serve as Director of Publicity at Hollywood Park and who was an integral part of Santa Anita’s publicity efforts for many years, passed away at his home in Irvine on Monday at the age of 80 following a long bout with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (C.O.P.D.).An avid racing enthusiast from his days at Fairfax High School in Los Angeles, Disney hired on at the Herald Examiner at the age of 19 in 1954 and, for the better part of 35 years, covered USC football and basketball, the Lakers, Raiders, Angels, Dodgers, boxing at both the Olympic Auditorium and the Forum, and even had a fling as an on-air pro wrestling analyst alongside the legendary Dick (Whoa Nellie!!) Lane, on KTLA channel 5.Known simply as “Diz” to close friends and press box colleagues, Disney was the product of a bygone era, when sports writers often drew close to the athletes they covered, and enjoyed, for the most part, non-adversarial relationships. Accordingly, Disney often recounted nights out on the town and eventful charter flights with the likes of Bo Belinsky, “Hot Rod” Hundley, Elgin Baylor, and many others, including one of his all-time favorite athletes, the Raiders’ Lester Hayes.“Jack’s love and enthusiasm for sports was evident in all of his reporting,” said former Santa Anita General Manager George Haines. “Jack built thousands of relationships over the years here in L.A. and these were of great benefit to him and all of us here at Santa Anita. He was just a class act and he was very well liked by our jockeys and horsemen. He will be sorely missed and my best wishes go to his wife and family.”Married for the past 19 years to his high school sweetheart, Emily, Disney enjoyed some of his greatest success late in life–as a Thoroughbred owner. Calling upon his close ties to the sports community, Disney and his twin brother, Doug, formed “Indizguys” Stable about 10 years ago. Members ranged from former Angel catcher, Buck Rogers, to former USC and San Francisco 49ers receiver Paul Salata and retired L.A. Times sports writer and Baseball Hall of Famer, Ross Newhan.This disparate entourage struck gold on Nov. 25, 2006, when, at the behest of the late trainer Mike Mitchell, they claimed a long-fused 5-year-old English-bred gelding named On the Acorn. Finishing fifth on the day they purchased him, On the Acorn was subsequently last in a field of nine for a $50,000 claiming tag on Dec. 16, 2006, but he then rattled off consecutive allowance wins on turf at Santa Anita and was poised for stakes company.In what Disney described as “A once in a lifetime” run, On the Acorn would go on to win the Grade II, $250,000 San Juan Capistrano Invitational Handicap on April 22, 2007, en route to a pair of $250,000 wins in the Grade II, Jim Murray Memorial Handicap on May 12, 2007 and on May 10, 2008.“Jack, along with (the late columnist and editor) Allan Malamud, were the people most responsible for me getting an opportunity at the Herald Examiner back in the late 70s and for that I was forever grateful,” said current Los Angeles Newspaper Group handicapper Bob Mieszerski, who worked alongside Disney at the Herald and is also currently serving as Thoroughbred Publicity Director at Los Alamitos. “Jack and I have been close ever since and I could always count on him for guidance and support.“He was a brilliant writer and a first class gentleman. In all the years I had the pleasure of knowing Jack, I never heard anyone utter a bad word about him. The world won’t be the same without him and I already miss him terribly. I only hope he knew how much I loved and appreciated him.”In addition to his wife, Emily and brother, Doug, Jack Disney is survived by his sons, Rick and Mitchell, and two grandchildren. Services are pending. POPULAR SCRIBE COVERED ORIGINAL L.A. ANGELS, NEWLY ARRIVED LAKERS IN 1960slast_img read more

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19 Dec
2019

Rental housing project under way

first_img27 June 2003Thousands of rental housing units are to be constructed in KwaZulu-Natal, Gauteng and Mpumalanga following an agreement between the government, labour and the private sector.The chief director of programme management in the department of housing, Johan Wallis, told Parliament on Wednesday that the initiative, known as the “Job Summit Project”, aims to implement the construction of between 50 000 and 150 000 units in three phases, to be completed by 2005.Wallis said eight such projects were currently under way in Gauteng to construct a total of 5 000 units. “Construction has already begun on 450 units in Klipfontein and 970 units in Brickfields. Development in Faraday, Metro Mall, Tribunal Gardens, Better Buildings, Doornfontein and Baralink are still in planning stages,” he said.In Tasbet Park and Duvha Park in Mpumalanga, 5 000 units are being constructed east of the N4, with 20 completed units to be handed over to tenants on 1 July.Wallis said that although the Durban Metro had approved the construction of 700 units in Roosfontein Hill in Cato Manor, the department had had to cancel the construction of a further 2 800 units at Mount Moriah in KwaMashu because the area is notorious for non-payment of rates and taxes.“Rental is not a cheap option. Units are very expensive to build, but because of government subsidies the poor will have increased access to the units,” Wallis said.Government has agreed to provide R380-million in subsidies, with a further R225-million made available for the project from poverty relief funds.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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18 Dec
2019

Bin cleaners bring Hollywood to Khayelitsha

first_img23 March 2016Buhle Sithela cleans bins in Khayelitsha and uses the money to screen films https://t.co/PyEKZgu6dv pic.twitter.com/xAyyapk00v— neo (@_maditla) March 17, 2016As an events marketing student at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), 21-year-old Buhle Sithela started his bin cleaning business as part of a practical assignment. It soon blossomed into a full-time community service.“I wanted to do something that would benefit the community, so I set up this event where people in my (area) could bring their bins and me and my friends would wash them for a small fee,” Sithela told Amaphiko social enterprise website.The Khayelitsha Bin Clean Project is based in Harare, Khayelitsha. Every Friday, Sithela and his friends clean more than 30 bins, charging R50 per bin. “Initially,” says Sithela, “we didn’t have that many bins. We started with five bins, but things picked up so quickly.”Clients – such as resident Linda Madlebe – are happy with the service, and speak glowingly about Sithela and his friends’ efforts to improve the neighbourhood. “These guys are setting a good example in our community,” Madlebe told Amaphiko, “especially given that it is gang-ridden. I hope their project grows.”Sithela focuses on the project full-time as he had to drop out of college last year because of a lack of funds. But it hasn’t been without its difficulties. Besides money being tight, some of the people who help him clean the bins have personal problems that make running the project difficult. “Some of them are suffering from drug addiction and there are times I’ve had to single-handedly clean over 30 dustbins. It’s tough.”Yet there have been personal triumphs and great learning experiences from starting the business, he says. One of the ways he gives back using the money raised from the business, is to offer community film screenings for youngsters and older residents alike. “Film has always been one of my biggest passions, but. there are little to no cinemas in the townships. So I decided to start my own screenings.”Since July, Sithela has hosted regular film screenings at a local church. “I had to borrow speakers and a projector from a friend, (and while) the (first) turnout wasn’t great either. I was just happy I did it,” he explains. Some of the films shown include the recent James Bond film and popular favourites such as the Rush Hour movies and Friday, as well as the latest local films.While financing the events present a challenge, leaving not much money from the business over for himself, he is still glad he’s making a difference for his community. And all his hard work has not gone unnoticed.Sithela is doing an internship with another innovative entertainment business, the mobile, solar-powered cinema Sunshine Cinema, which takes movies to rural and disadvantaged areas.It has been useful to research ways of expanding his own plans for his business, he says. “I just hope it grows big enough to sustain my passion for cinema. I have this dream of hosting a huge open air screening at Lookout Hill in Khayelitsha. Slowly but surely, I’m getting there.”Source: Amaphiko websitelast_img read more

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17 Dec
2019

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast – January 19th, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest West-southwest winds will help temps climb today, and that moderating push holds through the weekend. . We see the entire state above freezing today and tomorrow and most of the state should be well above normal all weekend. Tomorrow, temps should do a little better than today, but still we fall short of last week’s thaw levels. We still look for a lot of snow melt in the coming daysClouds build for Sunday, but precipitation should be somewhat limited. Scattered light moisture should slowly overspread the state, particularly Sunday afternoon and evening. Spits, sprinkles and drizzle may amount to a few hundredths to .1” over 50% of the state, and the best chances will be over the northern half to third of Ohio. This will be enough to make for a bit of a damp feel, and to keep us from feeling warmer than Saturday. Our cold front finally arrives midday Monday and brings rain through midday Tuesday. We like rain totals of .25”-.75” with 90% coverage. These rains have been well advertised, and we are not moving away from our prior forecast here. Keep the umbrella handy. The map above shows potential rain totals through Tuesday evening.As cold air pushes into the state behind the frontal boundary, we think there will be a good deal of lake effect cloudiness possible for the balance of Tuesday and Tuesday night. The best chances for light snow will be seen over the eastern third of the state, and of course, most likely in far NE Ohio. Eastern locations can see a coating to an inch overnight Tuesday night, and northeast areas can see several more inches in the right conditions. Western areas likely see only a few flurries in the current set up. Cold air is in for the balance of Tuesday night right on through Thursday morning. However, southwest winds come back as we progress through next Thursday. From here forward, we are making a few subtle changes to our forecast this morning.The next front we are watching shows up overnight Thursday night into Friday with rains from .25”-.5” over about 80% of the state. Temps will be warm enough to produce all liquid precipitation in the heaviest high areas, but we have to watch for some rain-snow mix in the east during the overnight part of the storm evolution. , This is just the first wave of several to come. Very early Saturday morning we see a second wave bringing half to 1” rains to all of the state through the balance of Saturday. . This moisture comes in with mild temps still in place. Then, we have a third wave, complete with another low pressure center moving over the region for thelast_img read more

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