18 Dec
2019

Short Straight Mix Color Fashion Full Bangs Soft Touch Bob Wig, Overall fantastic quality for the price

first_imgOverall superb good quality for the price. Hair really sensible though parting is a small a lot more evident as somewhat elevated but could be owing to the way it was packaged. I essential to trim the fringe a little. Total excellent high-quality for the cost.The color pretty fairly, the texture soft and quite full. This device arrived rapidly, the color incredibly quite , the texture soft and quite full, i wore it a whole working day and even wore it to perform, it was cozy and gentle , my co staff even just thought all i did was color my hair.Pleasant merchandise but just did not go well with me so returned but that was no reflection on the product or service.Key specs for Short Straight Mix Color Fashion Full Bangs Soft Touch Bob Wig:Heat-friendly fibersLightweight and comfortable on your scalpBasic Cap with Adjustable StrapsColor Deviation may Happen Due to Different Monitor settingLength 8 Inches mixed color bob WigComments from buyers“Overall fantastic quality for the price, Nice to wear as not as heavy as other wigs , the color very pretty, the texture soft and very full, Very please with it, the wig was exactly what “Nice to put on as not as large as other wigs. Awesome to dress in as not as major as other wigs i have worn. Only draw back is it is a bit for me and even even though i’ve tightened the straps it gapes a little bit each facet. Nonetheless i’m really pleased with it and for the value its fantastic. It i’ve obtained lots of compliments and my daughter claimed i seem really stylish.I bought it for a social gathering because i did not assume a lot from it for the price, but it is definitely gorgeous.Extremely make sure you with it, the wig was particularly what. Quite be sure to with it, the wig was precisely what i purchase. My hair is long but the down facet is the wig did not accommodate me, created my deal with search unwanted fat.last_img read more

Read More
17 Dec
2019

Trade emphasis a part of newly announced USDA reorganization

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Thus far, U.S. agriculture has fairly mixed reviews about President Donald Trump. Despite massive support from rural America in his election, the president has been generating significant concern with crucial agricultural policies, most notably with regard to international trade.Trade, of course, is absolutely essential for the economic sustainability of virtually every major U.S. agricultural commodity. The President’s very aggressive stance in opposition to beneficial trade deals for agriculture including the Trans Pacific Partnership (which President Trump withdrew from) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (which President Trump threatened to withdraw from) were making U.S. agriculturalists increasingly uneasy, if not outright angry.The Trump Administration directly addressed this and other growing agricultural concerns in a Cincinnati press conference with newly confirmed U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue.Listen to the full audio from the press conference here.Secretary Purdue in Cincinnati 5-11-17 FULL AUDIO“In order to advance agricultural trade, USDA intends to create an Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs and realign the Foreign Agricultural Service to report to the new Undersecretary,” Perdue said. “Our plan to establish an undersecretary for trade fits right in line with my goal to be American agriculture’s unapologetic advocate and chief salesman around the world. By working side by side with our U.S. Trade Representative and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, the USDA undersecretary for trade will ensure that American producers are well equipped to sell their products and feed the world.”Photo by Dale Minyo.In the last farm bill, Congress provided direction for USDA to examine options for reorganizing the international trade functions at USDA and potentially creating the new Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs. The new trade-focused position at the USDA is part of a larger department-wide reorganization. Under the existing structure at USDA, the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), which deals with overseas markets, and the Farm Service Agency (FSA), which handles domestic issues, are housed under one mission area, along with the Risk Management Agency (RMA). Perdue pointed out that it makes much more sense to situate FAS under the new undersecretary for trade, where staff can sharpen their focus on foreign markets.Perdue said that the reorganization also includes the formation of a new Farm Production and Conservation mission area with a customer focus that meets USDA constituents in the field.“To create a customer-focused culture of public service and improve service delivery to agricultural producers, USDA intends to create an Undersecretary for Farm Production and Conservation and realign the Farm Service Agency, the Risk Management Agency, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service to report to the renamed Undersecretary,” Perdue said. “USDA also intends to realign the Rural Development agencies to report directly to the Secretary to provide additional visibility for the investments being made in rural America.”Though a reduction in USDA workforce is not part of the reorganization plan, with big budget cuts proposed by the Administration the reorganization efforts will likely ultimately facilitate doing more with less.“USDA remains committed to focusing our constrained resources where they will be most effective — on pushing our record-breaking pace of trade and ensuring that opportunities exist throughout the country for Americans to participate in a transformational global economy. In particular, USDA continues to negotiate and support strong trade deals that will open up markets and help farms, ranches, forests, and production facilities grow, create jobs, and increase wages,” Perdue said. “This plan also details additional changes to our Department that will improve the effectiveness of USDA efforts to meet the needs of agricultural and forest managers and demonstrate increased accountability to the American taxpayer.”Click HERE to view the report on the USDA website.The reviews remained mixed from the agricultural community. Those keenly interested in moving trade forward were pleased.“The National Corn Growers Association has long advocated for a dedicated position at USDA focused on increasing U.S. agricultural exports, and we pushed for this provision in the 2014 farm bill. We are pleased to see that post finally become a reality today,” said Wesley Spurlock, president of the National Corn Growers Association. “Secretary Perdue’s announcement signals to farm country that the Trump Administration is listening to America’s farmers and ranchers. In this farm economy, trade is more important than ever to farmers’ incomes. Overseas markets represent 73% of the world’s purchasing power, 87% of economic growth, and 95% of the world’s customers. Now is the time for U.S. agriculture to fully capitalize on growing global demand for our products. Today’s announcement is a big step toward that goal.”There were concerns, however, about some other parts of the re-organization.“The Center for Rural Affairs has fought on behalf of rural communities for nearly 45 years. We are heartened that Sec. Perdue is making strong efforts during his early days in office to express support for rural communities. However, we are concerned about the path he has chosen. Sec. Purdue has proposed eliminating the position of Undersecretary for Rural Development and moving oversight of Rural Development agencies to the Deputy Secretary, USDA’s second-in-command. If he makes this change, Sec. Perdue will be removing the position of the most significant rural advocate within USDA. Rural America stands to suffer as a result,” said Anna Johnson, Center for Rural Affairs Policy Associate. “While USDA has a broad mission to promote and support our country’s food and agriculture, Rural Development is the only part of USDA that has the explicit directive to support rural communities.last_img read more

Read More
12 Dec
2019

5 Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families

first_imgA new research brief was recently published by Child Trends, a non-profit research center focused on the well-being of children and youth, summarizing findings from recent research on the risks to young children as a result of changes and challenges inherent in today’s military family life.The following information from Child Trends’ monthly e-newsletter highlights five reasons that we need to be paying special attention to children under age 6. [Reprinted with permission.]Five Risks Facing Young Children in Our Military FamiliesMore than two million children in the U.S. have had a parent deploy to Afghanistan or Iraq. When a parent goes to war – and often for years afterward – families are deeply affected. Young children are especially vulnerable, because they’re physically and emotionally dependent on adults, and because their brain development can be disrupted by high levels of stress. When young children experience high levels of stress and trauma, the effects can continue well after their parents’ military service ends, when their families may have less access to needed supports.In Home Front Alert: The Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families, Child Trends examined the special circumstances characterizing the lives of children under age six in military families. From that research, we offer five reasons why young children in military families might be at risk:Deployment is stressful, even for the non-deployedParents who stay behind may experience depression, anxiety, and loss of financial and social support when their spouse or partner deploys. Getting and maintaining child care and health care (particularly mental health care) may be newly challenging. How well young children do under the circumstances of deployment can depend on how successfully the non-deployed parent (or other caregiver) copes with these burdens.Young children sometimes blame themselvesYoung children have little ability to comprehend the facts surrounding their deployed parent’s absence. They may feel responsible for causing the losses they experience, and develop emotional or behavioral problems. Children’s reactions are greatly influenced by their age: preschoolers may become more “clingy” or otherwise regress in their behavior, and may openly express their fears; toddlers may become more withdrawn or sad, or have more tantrums or sleep problems; babies may become listless or irritable, or stop eating. Among older children with a deployed parent, emotional or behavioral problems, anxiety symptoms, and academic difficulties may occur.Cumulative stress can put children at riskExcessive stress changes brain processes that regulate emotion and behavior, and can have other damaging health effects. The quality of relationships, particularly a young child’s attachment to his or her parents, can either buffer or magnify these negative effects. When stress on the non-deployed parent reaches overload, good parenting can suffer. Children are at greater risk for abuse or neglect when a parent is deployed. Longer deployments and multiple tours may be especially hard on families.The end of deployment can bring new challengesIt can take time for a returning parent to reintegrate into family life. Young children may need time to get reacquainted with a parent who, in some cases, they don’t remember. When returning military members have suffered significant injuries – physical or psychological – young children can react with fear and anxiety. Parental roles and styles of coping and survival adopted during the period of deployment need to be renegotiated. There is an increased risk for domestic violence under these circumstances. About one in six service members returning from deployment in Afghanistan or Iraq returns home with post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries, and other serious mental disorders. This adds to the risks faced by their children and families.The composition of the armed forces has changed, and the system is straining to meet its needsThe composition of America’s armed forces has changed in many ways – more mothers, more single parents, more National Guard and Reserves members. Mothers with minor children now make up about one in six members of the active-duty military. Children in dual-military families (about six percent of the total) can have their home lives completely overturned when the second parent is deployed; temporary caregivers, such as grandparents, may be poorly prepared for these new responsibilities. While the military has a child care system that has been the envy of the civilian world, the system currently strains to meet the need. With increased numbers of parents in the Guard or Reserves (now nearly half of the total force), many families don’t have the supports, formal and informal, that come with living on base. Promising approaches for addressing the needs of today’s military-connected families include home visiting models and better access to mental health services, including cognitive-behavioral therapy for preschoolers affected by trauma. Additionally, school personnel and other service providers would benefit from a deeper understanding of the challenges and strengths associated with military family life. Contributors: David Murphey7/2013, Publication #2013-34Child Trends 5 (monthly e-newsletter) is supported by the The Irving B. Harris Foundation.©2013 Child Trends. May be reprinted with citation.____________________________________________________________For more information:Child Trends Special Report videoResearch brief (8 pages)____________________________________________________________Posted by Kathy Reschke, Child Care Leader at Military Families Learning Network.last_img read more

Read More
27 Nov
2019

Why Rahul Dravid is the best man to assist Indian team in England

first_imgRahul DravidAfter it has been learnt that batting legend Rahul Dravid will join the Indian team in an advisory role to prepare for the tour of England, it would be interesting to have a look at his track record against the English.When India visited England the last time in 2011, they miserably lost the four Test series 0-4 which was followed by their 1-2 loss at home in 2012-13. Dravid was India’s best batsman in the 2011 tour with 461 runs, three centuries and a staggering average of 76.83.Also, who can forget his 602-run total in the four-Test series against England in their backyard in 2002 that got him the man of the series award? Talking of English conditions, Dravid had also emerged as the top scorer of the 1999 World Cup tournament with 461 runs from eight games at an average of 65.85 and a strike rate of 85.52.This time, Dravid will be with the team till the start of the first Test on July 9.”Rahul Dravid, former India captain, has accepted a request from the Indian team management, to support and advise the team in its preparatory stages of the tour of England, given his vast experience and knowledge of the game,” PTI quoted Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) secretary Sanjay Patel as saying in a statement on Sunday.”He will be with the team till the beginning of the first Test.”India have already played a warm-up three-day match against Leicestershire (June 26-28) and will take on Derbyshire in another practice game July 1-3.advertisementIndia will then play five Test matches against England from July 9 to Aug 19 followed by five One-Day Internationals (ODI) from Aug 19 to Sep 5 and a lone Twenty20 International at Birmingham on September 7.last_img read more

Read More