18 Jan
2021

Fletcher School Pupil Tests Positive For COVID Virus

first_imgZUMA / MGN JAMESTOWN — The Chautauqua County Health Department has confirmed that a pupil at Fletcher Elementary School has tested positive for the COVID-19 virus.Officials said the pupil last attended school in person on Thursday, Oct. 8.The Jamestown School District said no in-school contact tracing will ne required and that the child was remote-learning when contact with another positive test person was made. out-of-school contact tracing is taking place.Officials said parents need to understand that a confirmed case does not mean that they have been in contact with the pupil who tested positive. “We want to remind our families, students and staff to keep our students and staff safe by wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and continuing frequent hand washing whether at school or in the community,” said JPS Superintendent Dr. Kevin Whitaker. “As a parent, if you see your child exhibiting any COVID-19 symptoms, please keep your child home and contact his or her health provider for a diagnosis.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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19 Oct
2020

Reagents shortage yet another test of accuracy for Indonesia’s COVID-19 data

first_imgRead also: COVID-19: Indonesia on hunt for PCR testing kitsDisease control and prevention director general Achmad Yurianto of the Health Ministry acknowledged that the shortage of regents had forced a number of laboratories to halt testing, leaving only 37 out of 78 labs able to submit test results on Tuesday. However, he assured that a new supply of reagents enough to support up to 15,000 tests was en route to the archipelago.”The stock was sent from South Korea this morning,” Yurianto told The Jakarta Post on Thursday.Indonesia has been scrambling to obtain the chemical reagents necessary for the COVID-19 PCR tests amid the global shortage, with the government seeking to procure them from countries that have a surplus of testing kits.President Joko Widodo has called for health authorities to expand PCR testing to at least 10,000 tests per day – or 300,000 tests per month – amid criticisms that the country has one of the lowest testing rates in the world.According to government data, Indonesia has tested 59,936 samples for the COVID-19 virus by Thursday, with 7,775 samples testing positive for the coronavirus. Of these confirmed cases, 635 patients have died.The government has estimated that Indonesia would need to conduct 1.2 million tests by May.However, many observers – including state officials – have cast doubt on the government’s COVID-19 figures, saying that minimal test coverage, multiple case categories and “nontransparent” data pointed to a high likelihood that the real number of cases in the country could be higher than official reports.Despite the shortage of reagents and the country’s dependence on imports to overcome this, Yurianto did not believe it would be efficient to produce the chemicals locally.“We are running against time and producing the reagents ourselves would take time and [a long] process,” he said.The director of the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, Amin Soebandrio, explained that the reagents required a specific level of refinement and needed to be validated for use in the COVID-19 PCR tests.Nonetheless, he said that the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) and the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) were currently attempting to produce the PCR test reagents.“Hopefully, within 2 to 3 weeks, locally made reagents will be able to contribute [to nationwide PCR tests] a little, even though they may not be able to supply nationwide laboratories,” he told the Post.However, Eijkman’s deputy for fundamental research, Herawati Sudoyo, warned that developing the reagents for the COVID-19 tests had to be done carefully to meet high quality assurance standards.Read also: COVID-19: More than 380 foreigners among infected in IndonesiaWhen asked about the possibility of alternative tests to detect the coronavirus, Herawati maintained that the PCR testing method was currently the “gold standard” for COVID-19 detection.“The reagents shortage is not happening just in Indonesia. It’s happening around the world because no one was prepared for the pandemic. But PCR [testing] remains the best option,” she said.In the meantime, Eijkman has secured a sufficient stock of reagents for the next two to three weeks, and its lab was still testing more than 300 samples per day.In Surabaya, East Java, the University of Airlangga Institute of Tropical Disease (ITD Unair) initially reported on Monday that it had run out of reagents and that the supply it had ordered on March 24 had yet to arrive.On Thursday, ITD Unair head Maria Lucia Inge Lusida told the Post that the center had resumed testing received enough reagents from the Office of the Coordinating Maritime Affairs and Investment Minister to test 1,400 samples.In the nation’s capital, Jakarta Health Laboratory head Endra Muryanto said that the regional lab, which had already tested 10,160 samples so far, had secured enough reagents to continue testing for the next few days.While the West Java Health Laboratory said it had also secured a new supply of reagents, it expressed concern over the general availability of reagents.“Extraction reagents are hard to obtain, and we are worried that we might have to stop testing because of a delay in the arrival of the [imported] reagents,” said laboratory head Ema Rahmawati.Topics : A shortage of reagents is interfering with the government’s efforts to ramp up much-needed mass testing for the coronavirus, posing another challenge for Indonesia regarding the true scale of its outbreak.Over the past two days, a number of the country’s laboratories have temporarily stopped running polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests because the supply of reagents – the substance essential to testing swab samples – had yet to arrive from abroad.In South Sumatra, for instance, the Palembang Health Laboratory (BBLK) had to stop testing samples due to the lack of reagents. The halt on testing caused the province to record zero new cases of COVID-19 on Monday and Tuesday, kompas.com reported.The reagents are necessary to isolate the indicators for the coronavirus RNA from human DNA in swab samples to determine whether the test subject had the virus or not.last_img read more

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24 Sep
2020

William L. Wendel, age81

first_imgWilliam L. Wendel, age 81, of Cedar Grove, Indiana died Friday, February 27, 2016 at his home on the farm which has been in the Wendel family since 1913.Born July 21, 1934 in Whitewater Township, Franklin County, Indiana he was the son of the late William F. & Sarah (Minnemann) Wendel. He was a graduate of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio with a Bachelor of Science Degree, and then attended Trinity Seminary in Columbus, Ohio.On February 4, 1967 he was united in marriage to the former Judi Misir, and she survives.Mr. Wendel was a farmer and had farmed in Franklin County for much of his life. He was a member of Hope Lutheran Church in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was a former member of the Franklin County Soil & Water Conservation District. In his leisure time he enjoyed reading, books on history & archeology were among his favorites. He also enjoyed collecting Indian artifacts and arrowheads, as well as gardening. He was a dedicated family man, and loved his children and grandchildren dearly.Besides Judi, his loving wife of 49 years, survivors include three children, John Christian (Regina) Wendel of Cedar Grove, Indiana, Heidi Kristin (Tom) McKenna of Cincinnati, Ohio, Amy Christine (Tom) Monroe of Brookville, Indiana; 10 grandchildren, Todd, William, Leah, Hannah, Joseph, Erin, Nick, Matt, Ava and Tavia; two sisters, Shirley (Gene) McNally of West Harrison, Indiana, Ruth (Larry) McMillin of Cedar Grove, Indiana; three brothers, Donald (Marilyn) Wendel, and Jerry (Donna) Wendel all of Cedar Grove, Indiana; Jim (Connie) Wendel of Milroy, Indiana.In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a son, Christian William Wendel.Family & friends may visit from 10:00 A.M. until 12:00 Noon on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at Hope Lutheran Church, 4695 Blue Rock Road, Cincinnati, Ohio.Pastor Lisa Arrington & Pastor Robert Groenke will officiate the Funeral Services at 12:00 Noon on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at Hope Lutheran Church, 4695 Blue Rock Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247. Burial will then follow in Wesley Chapel Cemetery.In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be directed to Hope Lutheran Church, Trinity Lutheran Church, or the Franklin County Antique Machinery Club Scholarship Endowment C/O FCCF. Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Wendel family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

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16 Sep
2020

Football: Here’s Wisconsin’s only highlight from the Big Ten Championship game

first_imgIt’s a day that will go down in infamy for the Wisconsin football team, but thanks to a caring Ohio State fan, Badgers supporters now can reflect on that fateful December Saturday in a slightly positive light.It must have taken a lot of digging to find Wisconsin’s best moments from the 2014 Big Ten Championship, but someone who loves rubbing it in had enough time on his or her hands to put together this short reel of Wisconsin’s finest minute from Ohio State’s 59-0 thumping of the Badgers.The term highlights is a bit of a misnomer because there was really only one highlight.Here it is:In case that brought back bad memories, here is the missed field goal that helped Wisconsin defeat Auburn in the Outback Bowl and salvage some dignity.Almost makes you want to dance now.last_img

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