12 Jun
2021

Disinform, amplify and intimidate: attacking press freedom online

first_img Organisation Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms PredatorsFreedom of expressionInternet Related documents predators_online_final.pdfPDF – 2.49 MB Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms PredatorsFreedom of expressionInternet Narendra Modi, Vladimir Putin, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi and Xi Jinping – all of these press freedom predators have understood the advantages to be gained from amplifying their propaganda and discrediting journalism on social networks, leading to new forms of censorship.RSF has devised an infographic that analyses the step-by-step strategy and the human and technical resources that are deployed to this end. Disinformation campaigns are amplified by the troll armies created by these authoritarian regimes. They are often helped by unscrupulous companies that sell them fake accounts and bots – programmes that automatically circulate content on social networks.Once the propaganda messages have been widely disseminated – which has the effect of drowning out reliable journalist content – the troll armies unleash cyber-attacks against independent websites and the personal accounts of independent journalists in order to discredit and silence them. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is investigating and analyzing the way press freedom’s predators have managed to adapt their traditional and authoritarian practices to new technology. Bots, fake accounts, email bombing…which methods are being used by these regimes online? center_img News RSF_en April 12, 2018 Disinform, amplify and intimidate: attacking press freedom online Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

Fake 50 euro notes in circulation

first_imgTwitter Print Advertisement Linkedin WhatsApp THE NUMBER of fake 50 euro notes circulating in Limerick was up this week, with seven incidents reported to Gardai.The duds were given in exchange for goods in various outlets across Limerick, mainly grocery stores, petrol stations, a pharmacy and a juice bar. In some of the instances the fraudsters managed to con staff, but in other cases, the forgeries were spotted and the notes were not accepted. On a couple of occasions staff held on to the fakes until gardai arrived.One of the culprits involved in trying to use these dud notes is described as a young red haired male of approximately 19 years and reported to have been wearing a navy tracksuit and runners at the time at the time of the attempted fraud.Gardai remind people to make sure and carry out essential security checks on euro notes. Obvious security features should be identified before accepting notes, these include; checking for the watermark, security thread, hologram patch and raised print. The value numeral on the 50 euro note will also change colour from purple to olive green or brown when tilted if the note is a genuine.By taking a few seconds to feel, examine and tilt euro notes, fraudsters can be prevented from passing off their fakes as the real thing.center_img Previous articleCollins family to march in honour of Roy’s deathNext articleLease Market’s Field for soccer, cllr pleads admin Email Facebook NewsLocal NewsFake 50 euro notes in circulationBy admin – May 7, 2009 2497 last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

State senator examines Indiana labor policy

first_imgFor believers in the power and need for collective bargaining, Indiana State Sen. John Broden says now is an incredibly frustrating and troubling time. “In the last five to six years, a lot of our labor laws have fallen to the wayside. If you believe that labor organizations have the right to collective bargaining, Indiana has certainly taken a number of steps back,” Broden said. Tuesday night, the Higgins Labor Studies Program Friends and Alumni Network sponsored a discussion with Broden, who graduated from the University in 1987, in which he focused on fighting for laborers rights in the Indiana State Senate. “I’ve loved working in the General Assembly, but it’s definitely gotten more challenging. I’m a Democrat, and we’ve always been the minority but we’re even more severely the minority now,” Broden said. “Indiana has traditionally sort of been a swing state, it’s not monolithically Republican. But right now, at the state legislative level, it is.”Though 32 members of the Indiana General Assembly were Republicans when Broaden was sworn in, there are currently 40 Republicans, making up a more significant majority.“The 32 members that are Republicans were much more moderate strain when I was sworn in than the 40 members that are there now. Now, you know, we’re seeing more and more conservative members beating those more moderate members in elections, and we’re losing that middle, more moderate group,” he said. Broden said his most difficult fight came over the common construction wage, which the Republicans wanted to repeal.“It appeared that logic was thrown out the window. The only people who were for this were non-union contractors, who did very little public work, and then there were very right wing people that were just ideologically opposed to this,” he said. “… and that’s what was so frustrating about this, because we then ended up repealing the common construction wage.”Broden talked about his growing frustration with the Republican majority in the General Assembly, particularly in regards to workers rights.“Running against teachers unions became very popular for Republicans. They were calling them out for protecting bad teachers, and then those bills passed, and then you know, Right to Work was next to go,” he said. Regarding Indiana’s recent status a Right to Work state, Broden said he was discontent with the way that legislation had been passed. In Right to Work states, labor unions are allowed, but workers in unionized professions cannot be forced to join unions.“Indiana is now what they call a Right to Work state. For a while, we avoided kind of taking up this fight, but you know you look around and there were a lot of members who wanted that. Recently, though, we’ve lost some members who were against Right to Work, so they were able to get that bill passed,” Broden said. Looking to the future, Broden said he is working on policies regarding the minimum wage in Indiana. “It’s extremely frustrating if you believe in labor rights, because things like minimum wage right now are being challenged and that’s something that we’re really fighting for but you know, we just can’t get it passed,” he said. Broden said his passion for politics and labor rights came primarily from his time at Notre Dame. “I really enjoyed my curriculum at Notre Dame, it confirmed everything I thought about politics, which I was interested from the very early days,” he said. “Two of my favorite courses were in labor studies, and there’s labor and labor history but then more importantly there’s labor economics, which sparked an interest in me that remains today.”Tags: John Broden, Right to Work Rachel O’Grady | The Observer State senator and Notre Dame alumnus John Broden discusses the variety of issues the Indianalegislature faces regarding minimum wage, right to work status and other labor policies.last_img read more

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28 Aug
2020

FRYER: Dear Liverpool, Firmino’s the gem you’ve been waiting for

first_imgRupert Fryer guest blogs about the man everybody’s talking about, whether it be transfer-mad English fans or Copa America spectators.With three defenders closing in, Neymar darted through space and in on goal. It was time to step up.After five consecutive victories since their disastrous World Cup exit, Brazil’s defence had been breached for the first time. Tied with Austria at 1-1, Dunga needed a saviour.His captain just needed the ball. With nothing but clean air between him and the Austrian goalkeeper, Neymar peered over his shoulder at the gangly kid with ball at his feet and braced himself. He needn’t have bothered. With little space for the pass, the kid ignored his team’s on- and off-pitch leader and fired an unstoppable drive into the top corner.Dunga had has win.And in instant Brazil wondered if it had found its no.9, even if it was someone they’d never heard of. When the 23-year-old Roberto Firmino was named in the squad for the first time in October last year a significant portion of the Brazilian media were scrambling to answer the question on everybody’s lips: Who?Both may have tales from their respective childhoods substituting a ball for a teddy bear at bed time but while Neymar was looking around the Real Madrid facilities as a 13-year-old, Firmino was surviving poverty and enduring failed trials with the likes of Sao Paulo before moving east to begin his career with the less fashionable Figueirense club in Florianopolis.No over successOne of the scores of Brazilians who left his homeland having barely made a splash in the local pond, he was plucked from the second-tier by German club Hoffenheim for around €4.5 million in 2010.   He was no overnight success: after a tricky start during which the club wondered if the move would prove a costly mistake, he overcame ails of indiscipline and poor punctuality before settling down and bulking up to adapt to the increased physicality of European football.His breakthrough season arrived in the 2013-14 campaign as he hit 16 goals in the Bundesliga, adding 12 assists. A ‘nine-and-a-half’, he can operate as a traditional centre-forward or drop off to help build the play and work in the pockets of space around onrushing colleagues.Time and again he’s displayed his ability to shoot from range and has also improved in the tight confines of the penalty area as a poacher. He graduated from a promising attacking midfielder to an all-round forward far away from the often parochial gaze of his compatriots.But he’s certainly no stranger now.He returned to the Brazil squad for the next set of friendlies in March and again came off the bench to score a winner, this time hitting the only goal of the game against Chile in London to exhibit his ability to time his runs and show a cool head in front of goal. “He can play for any club and with playing for Brazil that comes much easier,” Dunga said after that match-winner.Liverpool’s new manHe’s had to work for it, but Liverpool fans needn’t worry too much that he began the Copa America behind Diego Tardelli – a complete unknown to most European viewers – in the pecking order for Brazil’s false no.9 role – the introduction of which was intended circumvent Brazil’s lack of striking options and bring the best out of Neymar.Tardelli has lightening pace and roams from his position much more, leaving greater space for the Barcelona forward exploit (as he did for the equaliser against Peru last week). Neymar’s best post-World Cup performances have arrived when partnered with Tardelli.But with Neymar no more, it’s Roberto Firmino who looks to have won the battle to lead Brazil’s line after once again proving a match-winner as his goal gave the now Neymar-less Brazil a winning start in the 2-1 victory over Venezuela on Sunday. A shy and affable character when in front of the microphones or walking the hotel lobby, the Brazilian media have grown fond of his awkwardness in front of the cameras.Not that he’s afraid to stand up and be counted on the pitch, proving only too happy to take responsibility and unleash long-range drives at goal.  Schooled in Europe, the transition to the Premier League shouldn’t pose too many problems.Neither should another step into the limelight. He announced his arrival in international football by showing a willing to upstage the posterboy, captain and world-renowned ‘craque’.   “I think the time has come to take the next step,” he said this week. He’s been taking giant ones in recent months. Roberto Firmino has decided games for his country, and is certainly capable of doing the same at Anfield.–Rupert Fryer is a freelance journalist who has covered South American soccer for The Guardian, The Observer, The Score, Goal, ESPN, Fox Soccer and more. Graphics by courtesy WhoScored.last_img read more

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