4 Jun
2021

Online book of condolence for the late Jack Charlton

first_imgLimerickNewsSportSoccerOnline book of condolence for the late Jack CharltonBy Editor – July 16, 2020 168 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Facebook TAGSJack CharltonKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Advertisement Previous articleGuiding the city out of lockdownNext articleStephen Kenny’s selection headache: Ireland’s fantastic front four Editor Email Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash center_img Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Linkedin WhatsApp Print Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live MAYOR Michael Collins has opened an online book of condolence for the late Jack Charlton which will remain open until Tuesday, July 21st when it will be collated and sent to the FAI who will forward it to the Charlton family.Mayor Collins said that Jack Charlton held a special place in the hearts and minds of Irish people, thanks to his time as manager of the Irish Football Team and the success he brought in steering the team to their first ever finals appearances in the World Cup and European Championships.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “I would like people to sign the book and leave their tributes to the late football manager,” he added. The book of condolence can be accessed through the council website www.limerick.ie Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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25 May
2021

Local author’s debut book recounts harrowing path to being heard

first_imgThis was written for the Ithaca Voice by contributor Sara Belcher.ITHACA, N.Y.—Eliza VanCort has always had an intimate relationship with communication. As a speaker, communications and career consultant, and author, she has spent a lot of time studying the way we communicate and knows what works and what doesn’t. Her debut book, A Woman’s Guide to Claiming Space: Stand Tall. Raise Your Voice. Be Heard. has just released, offering women an easy-to-follow guide on claiming the space they deserve in a variety of aspects—many of them through effective communication. While VanCort could be considered an expert communicator now, she admits it was a long journey to learn the skills she has today, and she credits her local community with helping her build much of those skills.From a young age, growing up in and around Ithaca, VanCort says she learned that being invisible was synonymous with safety, and she made herself smaller to cope with the traumas in her childhood.“My mother was an absolutely fantastic mother by all accounts (…) then she became paranoid schizophrenic and she ended up kidnapping me three times,” she says. “When you live in a world where little girls are taught to be small and then you combine that with that level of trauma and a fear of the world, it is very, very difficult to claim space.”Thankfully, VanCort had her local community supporting her from a young age. She says her father put her in therapy early while local women offered their direct support to her as she began to redefine and reclaim her space. In her local Big Brothers Big Sisters community, former Assistant Dean of Students at Cornell Alice Green would spend hours with her on the weekends, while her kindergarten teacher Roberta Wallitt would take her home on weekdays when her father was working “as if I were her own.” Your Arts & Culture news is made possible with support from: Tagged: a woman’s guide to claiming space, actor’s workshop, book, debut book, eliza vancort, katie spallone “People have talked about me as if I have some sort of super power, and I think it’s really important to understand that nobody does this alone. Nobody,” she says. “I had all these women, who are extraordinary women in their own right, taking care of me. Pulling me into their orbit. Loving me. Nurturing me. And I think my story is not a story that proves you can overcome anything alone, if you’re strong enough — my story is a story that proves that a child can go through tremendous trauma, and if their community rallies around them, they can do great things despite how their life started.”In 2014, VanCort’s communication skills were once again put to the test after she was involved in an accident; while out for a bike ride, she was hit head-on by a driver who was texting and driving and suffered a bilateral brain injury and a subdural hematoma. She says that her injury forced her to rewire her brain and relearn the communications skills she had spent much of her life building.“After seeing a Facebook post, where I typed with my eyes closed — because I couldn’t look at the screen because it hurt — [Katie Spallone] said to me, ‘I think you really need to keep writing Eliza. Just write every day and send it to me.’” Spallone is the co-director, along with VanCort, at The Actor’s Workshop of Ithaca Theater Training Studio and one of the first people to sign up for VanCort’s acting workshop, she says. “So I would write every single day. And I would send her my gobbledygook (…) and she would decipher what I was saying and edit it and send it back to me and say, ‘Keep writing, keep writing, keep writing.’” “And that was the beginning of my recovery and the beginning of my love of writing,” VanCort said. “So after that, I became fascinated with communication because my condition was so compromised after my accident, and I had to rebuild it brick by brick.”A Woman’s Guide to Claiming Space (available on Amazon and elsewhere) details all of the lessons VanCort has learned over the years, breaking it down into step-by-step instructions for women of all ages to follow. The book offers intersectional advice for women to claim (and retain) physical and authoritative space in the workplace, your local community, and in personal relationships. Her book tour opens with a local event at the The Cornell Store on May 12 at 5 p.m., where VanCort will be answering questions and signing copies of her book.“I think that it’s really important for us all to remember, there’s no lost causes—that no matter how hard the beginning has been,” VanCort says. “If your community rallies around you, there’s a good chance that you can turn out OK (…) It only takes one adult to change a life.” center_img last_img read more

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30 Dec
2020

Appalachian Trail Conservancy ask Hikers to Leave Trail

first_imgIn a few days, weeks or months, you are planning to embark on a journey on the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) — a journey many have described as “once in a lifetime” and “life-changing.” Some of you may have already begun your journeys. You’ve likely scrimped and saved to make this journey possible. You’ve combed over data, maps, and countless pages of information to prepare yourself. However, there is a highly contagious virus spreading throughout the country, including in Appalachian Trail states, and we have all been asked to make changes, make sacrifices, and/or take precautions to minimize its spread. Sandra “Sandi” MarraPresident & CEOAppalachian Trail Conservancy Your starting point: Do not start your section or thru-hike at the southern end of the Trail. Amicalola Falls State Park and Springer Mountain are the most common starting points, making them difficult places to establish distance between people. Large numbers start at these locations every day in March and April, and shelters and campsites at the southern end of the Trail stay crowded for weeks.Your finances: All hikers who show symptoms of COVID-19 should self-quarantine off Trail and stay off Trail until approved for return by a qualified medical professional. Hikers with symptoms of COVID-19 should minimize the potential spread of the virus by refraining from using public transportation — including shuttles, buses, rental cars, or planes — to travel home. Hikers should also have resources for medical and lodging expenses incurred during quarantine. Lastly, consider expenses associated with traveling home should a loved one contract the virus and require your care.Reduced support options: Many businesses and service providers along the Trail are closing temporarily. Local search and rescue may be dealing with local cases. Shuttle providers and Trail angels may be staying home, unwilling to put themselves or their families at risk. Fewer people will likely be willing to pick up hitchhikers. Hostels, outfitters, and libraries may be closed. Places that hold hiker packages may also close. Grocery stores and other locations where you were planning to resupply may have reduced inventory or may be sold out of vital items. And, to keep ATC staff safe and to avoid spreading the virus, ridge runners and caretakers normally found on Trail will no longer be available. Until further notice, all ATC Visitor Centers will be closed.Consider shelter: Plan to avoid shelters and other points of congregation for overnight accommodation. Self-supported camping on durable surfaces 200 feet from water sources with ample distance between tents is recommended. Hikers should also avoid using privies; instead, dig a cat hole more than 200 feet from water sources and camping areas.Vulnerable A.T. communities/limited healthcare options: Many communities along the Trail are likely low on resources and may have over-burdened healthcare systems. Carrying COVID-19 from the Trail into these communities (or vice versa) puts their healthcare systems, their healthcare workers, and the very communities that serve the Trail at risk. Some communities do not have healthcare options at all.Spreading the virus: The Appalachian Trail is not an easy place to isolate yourself. Staying in hostels, shopping at local grocery stores, eating in local restaurants, drinking beer in local bars — or the temptation to huddle with others in a shelter on a cold, rainy night when your gear is wet — are all chances to contract or spread COVID-19. Again, we urge anyone planning to section or thru-hike the Trail this year to postpone their hikes. If you do decide to hit the Trail, exercise caution and minimize risk to yourself, other Trail users, and to the Trail’s communities. If you have already begun your journey, we urge you to return home until these risks have passed. We do not make this request lightly. We manage and protect the A.T. because it is meant to be hiked. However, the practices necessary to support a section or thru-hike may make A.T. hikers vectors to spread COVID-19 — whether congregating at shelters or around picnic tables, traveling to trailheads in shuttle vans, or lodging at the various hostels up and down the Trail. Thank you, Dear Appalachian Trail Long-Distance Hikers, We know this is not an easy or small decision to make, but the impacts of potentially spreading COVID-19 during your journey are big. From the desk of Sandi Marra Should you decide to embark on your Trail journey despite the risk of exposing yourself or others to COVID-19, we ask you to consider the following: We at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) are now asking you to do the same: please postpone your section or thru-hike. Instead, consider alternate ways of connecting to the Trail and to the outdoors.last_img read more

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11 Jan
2020

Elizabeth Styles Under-21 semis on this weekend

first_imgThe Berbice Cricket Board (BCB) has committed to hosting over twenty cricket tournaments in 2018. Thus it will, over the course of this weekend, be hosting the semifinals of the Elizabeth Styles Under-21 Cricket Tournament.During this week alone, the BCB has hosted the Rose Hall Town Youth & Sports Club Patron’s Fund 10/10 First Division; Upper Corentyne Magic Moments 20/20, and the New York Business Group Under-19 tournaments.Albion will play Young Warriors in a playoff match at the Rose Hall, Canje Ground on Saturday, with the winner going on to play Blairmont Community Centre in the semifinals on Sunday at the Albion Ground. Albion is spearheaded by Kelvin Umroa, Karran Arjpaul, Ritesh Umroa, Antonia February, Joshua Harrichand and Ramesh Kassinauth.Young Warriors are led by national player Alex Algoo, Trevon Stanislaus, Gevon Schultz, Ricardo Ramdehol, Jerron France and Junior Doraway.Blairmont, which recently defeated Albion at the Under-19 level, is headed by Nigel Deodat, Seon Glasgow, Marvin Prashad and Javed Karim.Tucber Park will depend heavily on Brandon Corlette, Garfield Benjamin, Malcolm Mickle, Leon Swammy and Steve Deonarine to create an upset against powerhouse Rose Hall Town, which include numerous Berbice and Guyana players, among whom are Sylus Tyndall, Kevin Sinclair, Junior Sinclair, Kevlon Anderson, Keith Simpson, Mahendra Gopilall, Chanderpaul Govindan, Jonathan Rampersaud and Jeremy Sandia.The final is scheduled for next weekend at a venue to be decided by the Board.The vibrant Berbice Cricket Board has already completed the finals of the 2018 Under-15 finals, while finals for Under-17 and Under-19 levels will be played shortly. The tournament is being sponsored by Elizabeth Styles of the United States of America. The Cosmetics brand is very popular in Guyana, with Bissan Trading being one of its distributors locally.last_img read more

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