4 Jun
2021

Gardaí criticised over investigation of teenager’s death

first_imgNo vaccines in Limerick yet by Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected] family of a 16-year-old girl who was found submerged at the canal entrance to the Abbey river have accused Gardaí of not fully investigating the circumstances leading up to her deathCity coroner John McNamara had to call order to proceedings on a number of occasions when family members disrupted the inquest with questions and comments directed at gardai.The 16 year old girl, who was described as “level headed” and in good form, was last seen by her sister shortly after 11pm on the night before her body was discovered in the water by a passerby.Garda John O’Connell told the inquest there was no evidence that a minor assault on the girl earlier that night was linked to her death.At this point, the girl’s sister and brother asked why no other depositions were given as they were key to the circumstances on the night and could answer questions the family had about the girl’s death.The teenager was seen running from the High Street area of the city towards Denmark Street after her sister attempted to get her into a car to take her home.The family claimed that she was in the company of others when she ran from her sister.There were heated exchanges as family members told gardaí to tell the truth, claiming that they should have “further investigated” the circumstances and that there was a more sinister background to the girl’s death.Medical evidence indicated toxic levels of alcohol along therapeutic levels of diazepam and alprazolam. According to the pathology report, death was due to drowning.The coroner said that while he accepted that the girl did not have suicidal thoughts and there was no evidence of foul play, an open verdict would be the most appropriate one.One of the girl’s sisters responded: “Ye just want to open and shut this case so that it goes away – the questions will never go away for us”.Her mother said that “kids go to the canal for a drink, we all know that – they don’t go there to jump in the river. She was a happy girl and had the world in front of her. She didn’t know what she was doing but my daughter didn’t jump, I believe she was pushed.”Asked by Mr McNamara if there were any other lines of inquiry both Inspector Seamus Ruane and Garda John O’Connell said that the investigation had concluded and there was no other evidence.“Nobody saw her fall in. Nobody saw her jump in or nobody saw her being pushed so this inquest must return an open verdict”, the coroner said. Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL First Irish death from Coronavirus Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email TAGSfeaturedfull-image WhatsAppcenter_img Advertisement Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Linkedin NewsGardaí criticised over investigation of teenager’s deathBy Staff Reporter – November 14, 2013 616 Print Previous articleLimerick is ready to shuffle to Bombay Bicycle ClubNext articleMinister opens Red Door Business incubation centre Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Facebooklast_img read more

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12 May
2021

Testing times

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Testing timesOn 1 Jan 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article TheUK guidelines for drug and alcohol testing are essential reading for anyoneinvolved in the testing process and should be used as a template for best practiceIt was the US which first grasped the need to introduce drugs testing in theworkplace. President Ronald Reagan issued Executive Order No. 12564 on 15September 1986 requiring drug testing to be undertaken by all federal employeesin safety and security positions The American Department of Health and Human Services published the firstguidelines on workplace drug testing in the Federal Register in April 1988, andunder SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)1 theseare regularly reviewed. US guidelines The US guidelines specify the drug groups that should be included in aprimary screen, the screening cut-off levels, acceptable methods ofconfirmation and concentrations together with a range of other issues relatingto the chain of custody specimen collections. These guidelines have been adopted by a number of countries prior todeveloping their own. Some of the standards that have since been developeddiffer in many respects from those in the US. For example, the Australian/NewZealand Standard2 minimum drug profile includes benzodiazepines but notphencyclidine (PCP) which is rarely encountered outside the USA, and secondly,gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high performance liquidchromatography (HPLC) are acceptable as screening techniques as well as aconfirmation techniques. There are other differences not documented here. UK guidelines In 2000, the UK guidelines were developed by an expert group with wideexperience of workplace drug testing in this country. They represent anoverview of best practice for laboratories providing workplace drug testingservices within the UK. The guidelines are designed to ensure that the entiredrug testing process is conducted to give accurate and reliable informationabout a donor’s drug use. All laboratories that undertake legally defensible workplace drug testingwithin the UK should use the guidelines as a template for accreditation. TheUnited Kingdom Accreditation Service3 (UKAS) has been approached as the mostsuitable body to undertake this. The first set of guidelines focuses on the analysis of urine, which has longbeen accepted as the most useful specimen for drug testing. The UK guidelines have four main objectives: – To provide a minimum set of criteria for the providers of workplace drugtesting services within the UK – To ensure that the processes undertaken are capable of legal scrutiny – To provide safeguards to protect specimen donors – To define for laboratories common quality assurance and quality controlcriteria that are capable of being accredited by an external body. Within the guidelines, a number of key stages of the workplace drug testingprocess have been considered: Specimen collection Urine specimens for legally defensible drug testing need to be collectedunder circumstances that respect the dignity of the individual while ensuringthat the sample is fresh and has not been tampered with in any way. Theappendix of the UK guidelines contains an example of a typical protocol forurine collection. This provides advice on how to maintain the integrity of thespecimen by monitoring its temperature and making direct observations. An important aspect of specimen collection is gaining informed consent. Itasks donors to confirm their personal details and that the collection processhas been undertaken correctly. Laboratory analysis On receipt of a sample at the laboratory, initial checks are made on itschain of custody and appearance. If the sample passes these checks a portion istaken which goes through an initial screening test for the presence of drugs.Further testing of the validity of the sample may also take place at thisstage. If the screen results are negative no further analysis is undertaken.However, if they indicate the presence of a drug (above a predefined cut-offlevel) a confirmation test to prove or disprove its presence must be carriedout on another portion of the sample. Interpretation of results A positive result on analysis may be due to medication (prescribed orover-the-counter) or to a dietary cause. An essential part of the drug testingprocess is the final review of positive results. Interpretation is best carried out by a qualified medical practitioner, alsoknown as the medical review officer, who can consult with the laboratorytoxicologist, the donor and the donor’s GP. Quality assurance Drug testing laboratories must have a quality system that encompasses allaspects of the testing process such as sample receipt, chain of custody,security and reporting of results, and screening and confirmation testing. Quality assurance procedures must be designed, implemented and reviewed tomonitor the conduct of each step of the testing process. The standard set byISO 17025 must apply. The laboratory must be accredited for workplace drug testing by a recognisedexternal accreditation body, preferably UKAS, and must be working to standardsset by the UK guidelines. Additional guidelines are being developed to cover alcohol testing in arange of other biological samples, and drugs in oral fluids, hair and othersites. Methods have now been developed to assay drugs and alcohol in oral fluids,as well as in hair and the precise role of these alternative biologicalmatrices in drug testing is under investigation. Additional guidelines arebeing developed to cover these alternative biological samples. As of November 2001, it was agreed that the UK guidelines would form thebasis of the European guidelines. These latter guidelines would be a statementof common standards and principles, leaving each country free to adapt theappendices (cut-off levels, methodologies and so forth) for their ownrequirements and to meet national legislation. There is a proposal that these European guidelines4 could provide the basisfor a one-day workshop, to be held in autumn 2002. References 1. www.samhsa.gov2. http://www.standards.com.au3. www.ukas.com4. http://www.ewdts.orgOther relevant websites http://www.wdtforum.org.uk   http://www.tiaft.orgHelen Vangikar is consultant toxicologist at OmniLabs Limited last_img read more

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