21 Apr
2021

In the BB archives

first_imgA baker who had a better idea of the value of empty flour sacks than he had of the ethics of stealing was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment at Darlaston. He went to the bakehouse of a neighbour and wanted to buy 21 flour sacks, the value of which was seven shillings. The owner did not wish to sell them, and the prisoner went away, but afterwards, he was seen carrying the sacks from the premises. He was followed to a public house and, when charged with taking them, he expressed surprise that he should be charged with stealing, as the constable had recovered them. His plea, which did not obviate his imprisonment, was that he had been drinking and he did not know what he was doing.last_img

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18 Dec
2020

Hurricane preparedness: Prior planning prevents poor performance

first_imgJune 1 marked the official start of Hurricane Season, which means credit unions up and down the East Coast are dusting off their checklists from last year to make sure they are prepared. Chances are you are probably feeling relatively confident with the state of your hurricane preparedness plans, given that 2005 was the last year a major hurricane hit the United States when we saw Dennis, Katrina, Rita and Wilma come ashore. Before you get too comfortable, here are some things you should consider going into this year’s windy season:Hindsight is 20/20The last time we went this long without a major hurricane making landfall was when Ulysses S. Grant was in the White House. Modern records have been kept on hurricanes in this country since 1851. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), since that time two major hurricanes have made landfall every three years in the United States. Prior to this year, the longest streak without one was from August 1860 to September 1869.Why is this important to your credit union?History has shown that companies are most prepared for a hurricane right after they are impacted by a storm. Chances are that the employees that led you through hurricane season in 2004 and 2005 may no longer be with your credit union. In reviewing your plans this year, make sure to not only assess the strength and relevance of your plan, but also identify any employees who have previous experience with hurricanes. What new buildings and branches do you have? Both evacuation and flood zones can change quite a bit over 11 years; you may find that some of your locations would be required to evacuate sooner or are considered to be a higher flood risk than in previous years. What new third-party providers have you added, where are they located, and what will you need from them if a storm hits your credit union?Say it with CashThe Department of Homeland Security has a “Basic Disaster Supplies Kit” that includes items people will need in any natural disaster. The list includes items you would expect to see: food, water, flashlight, and a battery-powered radio. But one thing on this list could have a large impact on credit unions in particular: cash.After a hurricane, many businesses may find themselves without power. This means purchasing essential items for your family like groceries will require cash as local merchants may not be able to accept credit or debit cards. Cash quickly becomes a necessity in such a situation. During the time leading up to a storm, gas stations, grocery stores, home improvement stores and financial institutions see a heavy influx of customers. As a credit union, do your hurricane preparation plans take this increase in members at your branches into account? How will you handle needing more employees at the branch level when some of those same employees may be focusing on their own personal hurricane preparation? Will your ATMs need to be replenished more often than normal?Population BoomThe population that the United State Census Bureau identifies as the South has grown from 107 million to 121 million since 2005, an increase of almost 13 percent. More people require more roads, more schools and more businesses. The result is that in the event of a hurricane, mandatory evacuations will take longer.Your state’s Emergency Management officials take this into account when issuing evacuation orders. An evacuation order that would have been issued 24 hours prior to a storm making landfall in 2005 might be issued 36 hours prior to a storm making landfall today. Your plans should take into account that your credit union may have less precious hours to prepare between the identification of a credible threat of a storm making landfall and a government issued evacuation order than you had in the past.Times Have ChangedDo you remember what type of cellphone you had in 2005? Both the iPhone and Android were years away. Twitter did not exist. Neither did Dropbox. Most people had not heard of “the cloud.” Desktops still outsold laptops by a wide margin. Tablets would not be on the market until 2010. Almost all of these technologies are essential to most businesses today, and they did not even exist the last time we experienced a major hurricane. So have your plans kept up with all of these changes? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported in December that 47 percent of homes in the United States no longer have landlines. If your employees do not have power to charge their cellphones, how do you plan to contact them?As the saying goes, proper prior planning prevents poor performance. By thinking through these scenarios and potential pitfalls, hopefully this year’s hurricane season will be smooth sailing for your credit union, regardless of whether we have a major storm. 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,James Green James Green leads the business continuity program at PSCU. He is passionate about life safety and helps credit unions understand the importance of business continuity not just during an emergency, … Web: pscu.com Detailslast_img read more

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16 Aug
2020

Fantasy Baseball Trade Value: Jorge Soler, Patrick Corbin among buy-low, sell-high candidates

first_imgMORE: Fantasy Alarm PRO toolsFantasy Baseball Trade Value: Stock risingJoey Lucchesi, SP, Padres. Luchessi shut out the potent Brewers offense for seven innings on Monday, and that was just a continuation of his recent string of success. Over his past seven starts, he has pitched to the tune of a 2.70 ERA with a .162 against him during that stretch. There are a lot of things to like in his profile, too, especially when you compare this season to last. He has lowered his line-drive rate against from 22.8 percent to a 14.9-percent mark this season, upped his ground-ball rate from 44.7 percent to 50.2 percent, and lowered his hard-contact rate against from 40.6 percent to 33 percent, all of which are strong marks. In fact, the 14.9-percent line-drive rate is the best in baseball among qualified pitchers, while the ground-ball rate is in the top 20 and the hard-contact rate is in the top 10. Not too shabby. It also doesn’t hurt that the Padres are a much improved team and he already has six wins. Possible trade options: David Peralta or José Quintana.Jorge Soler, OF, Royals. Soler is having a great season, and I feel like either no one is noticing or no one is caring. He smacked another home run on Monday and now has 19 dingers and 51 RBIs for the year. Sure, the .245 batting average isn’t the best, but he’s on pace for over 40 home runs and 100 RBIs, which adds plenty of value to any fantasy team. Everyone has long thought that Soler had the power to turn into a slugger, but injuries have consistently derailed him year in and year out. However, this year he is healthy and showing just what he is capable of. He has a strong 42.5-percent hard-contact rate, and his 15.1-percent soft-contact rate is the best mark of his career. His 90.6-mph exit velocity is his highest mark since 2015, and his 14 launch angle is up 3.1 degrees from last season. He’s hitting cleanup in the Royals lineup, and with guys like Whit Merrifield, Adalberto Mondesi, and Alex Gordon in front of him, he should continue to have plenty of RBI opportunities. Possible trade options: Michael Conforto or Masahiro Tanaka .Ian Desmond, OF, Rockies. Desmond has struggled for the majority of the year, and less than two weeks ago he was hitting .234 with six home runs and 22 RBIs through 55 games. However, since then, he is on a 10-game hitting streak where he’s gone 17-for-37 with three home runs and 15 RBIs, bringing his season totals up to a respectable .274 with nine home runs and 37 RBIs. He actually has very good looking underlying numbers, as well, as his 41.4-percent hard-contact rate, 13.8-percent soft-contact rate and 23.8-percent line-drive rate are the best of his career. His 91.9-mph exit velocity is in the top 10 percent of the league. His 31.1-percent fly=ball rate is not great, but it is nearly 10-percent higher than the 21.5-percent mark that he posted last season. Let’s not forget that he plays half his games at CoorsField, and while that may put an asterisk on the stats he posts in real life (not literally of course), there is no asterisk for Coors games stats in fantasy. He should provide solid pop and RBI totals for the remainder of the season. Possible trade options: Justin Turner or German Márquez.Marcus Stroman, SP, Blue Jays. Stroman has pitched very well this year, but his low strikeout totals (7.0 K/9) and win totals (4-8 record) keep him from being a great fantasy option despite his strong 3.18 ERA. He lands in the “stock rising” section because there is a very strong chance that he gets traded at or before the trade deadline, and that will raise his fantasy value immediately. It is also good that his batted-ball profile will play no matter where he lands. A move to the Yankees would have fantasy owners worried with the small park, but they shouldn’t be, as Stroman’s 57.5-percent ground-ball rate should help him conquer any field. That ground-ball rate is the second best in baseball (among qualified pitchers). He has also done a great job of inducing soft contact against with a 21.7-percent mark (sixth best in baseball).  A trade to a contender would help him pick up more wins and make him a fantasy asset rather than just another guy on your roster.Fantasy Baseball Trade Value: Stock fallingDerek Dietrich, 2B, Reds. Dietrich sent a shockwave through the fantasy baseball world when he slugged three home runs in a game on May 28; however, since then he’s been dreadful at the dish, hitting .167 (7-for 42) with zero home runs and two RBIs over his last 13 games. The cold spell has seen his average for the season drop from .262 to his current .231 mark. There are also a lot of unsightly numbers in his batted-ball profile. His 25-percent soft-contact rate would be the worst in all of baseball if he had enough plate appearances to qualify, and his 14.3-percent line-drive rate would be the fifth worst. If his recent struggles at the plate aren’t enough of a cause for concern, the impending return of Scooter Gennett certainly is. Gennett is beginning a rehab assignment on Tuesday and will be the everyday second baseman when he returns, which likely pushes Dietrich into a utility/bench role going forward. His run as a fantasy asset is coming to an end. Patrick Corbin, SP, Nationals. Corbin has been torn apart in his past three starts, going 0-3 with an 11.37 ERA and 2.29 WHIP. During that stretch, hitters have batted .379 against him with a .638 SLG (yikes). To make matters worse, the three teams he faced are all near the bottom of runs scored this year (Reds, Padres, White Sox). The rough patch has his ERA for the season up to 4.11, a far cry from the 3.15 mark he posted last season with the D-backs. Cause for concern? Not entirely. When comparing this season to last season (his career year), the underlying numbers are actually better in a lot of areas, as his line-drive rate against is nearly seven percent lower, his hard-contact rate against is lower by five percent, and his fastball velocity is actually up 0.5 mph. His biggest issue is that he is giving up fly balls 10 percent more often, and that has contributed to the 12 homers he’s allowed — only three less than he gave up all of last season despite currently having 114.2 fewer innings pitched. While he may not produce the strong numbers that he did last year, Corbin is still a very good pitcher. This rough patch has created a buy-low window. Possible trade options: Tim Anderson or Jack Flaherty .Gio Urshela, 3B, Yankees. Urshela has gone cold at the plate, hitting .205 (9-for-44) with two home runs across 13 games in June. It couldn’t have come at a worse time either, with the Yankees trading for Edwin Encarnacion and the impending returns of Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton. With those three joining the lineup, Urshela is going to be relegated to a bench role with DJ LeMahieu taking over full-time duties at 3B. It’s an unfortunate turn of events for Urshela (and his fantasy owners), as he was having a career year to this point with five home runs, 31 RBIs, and a .306 average. His breakout campaign has looked for real, too, with a 26.9-percent line-drive rate, 46.2-percent hard-contact rate, and 8.3-percent soft-contact rate (would be the best mark in all of baseball if he had enough plate appearances to qualify). Less playing time equates to less fantasy production, and fantasy owners with Urshela need to accept that it’s time to move on.Fantasy Baseball Stock Watch: Potential waiver wire pickupCarlos Martínez, P, Cardinals. Martinez notched a six-out save in his most recent appearance out of the Cardinals bullpen, and he needs to be on everyone’s fantasy radar. It was his second save in June, and he has a 3.09 ERA through his first 11.2 innings pitched this season. Jordan Hicks is still the Cardinals closer, but it’s worth noting that he was available to pitch on Sunday and the Cardinals still elected to leave Martinez in for the ninth and the save. Martinez is a really good pitcher and has been for a long time, we all know that, but a pitcher’s role on a team has a big factor on his fantasy value. It appears that Martinez is moving into a more prominent one. He should provide solid ratios, and if he’s providing a handful of saves than he is worth a spot on your roster. He is still only 26-percent owned on Yahoo, so he can probably be had for free. We’ve focused on fringe players for deeper fantasy baseball leagues the past two weeks, but this week we’re back to looking at a mix of players who are either prime buy-low/sell-high trade targets or even potential waiver wire pickups.As we return to discussing some highly owned trade options, we’ll also return to discussing possible targets for those players. All leagues are different, so the types of players available depends on the settings and owners of your particular league, but these suggestions can help you properly value your player. Like everything in fantasy baseball, values are fluid, and some of the outlooks of these players have changed mightily recently. Let’s dive in!last_img read more

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