1 Mar
2021

My 21 years in Cambridge

first_img Related A student who calls two coasts home learns to bridge the gulf I am now in my eighth year of walking through Harvard Yard every morning on my way to class. And in many ways, this walk has remained the same. I will always be overdressed or underdressed for the changeable Cambridge weather, whose whims I still cannot predict. And I will always be rushing, my sense of time forever thrown off by the five minutes tacked onto the 8 a.m. start time of high school or the seven-minute grace period I now get in college. I pass the same brick buildings and dodge the same groups of tourists while clutching the same coffee from the Starbucks by the Red Line.When I first moved into Hollis Hall for dorm crew, carrying hastily packed belongings from my parent’s house in West Cambridge — 10 minutes away by car and 30 on foot — this impending sense of sameness had weighed me down. College had always been pitched to me as a transformative experience, where everything would be new and surprising and challenging. I had imagined that I would move at least a state away from home, to navigate the roads into New York City on move-in day, or the particularities of muggy weather in Washington, D.C., or the greener and quieter landscapes of Vermont.This move to a new place, far enough away from my parents and high school friends and familiar sights to trigger something new in me too, was supposed to mark my first big step toward adulthood. It was in the process of moving and the experience of living somewhere else that I believed growth could happen. By comparison, staying in Cambridge seemed like a sentence to stagnation. Finding comfort at home and here The image of college as a place defined by its students’ experience of newness — surprise roommates in unknown dorm housing in an unfamiliar college town — is ingrained not just in my own imagination, but in the culture as well. This cultural imagination is predominantly an American one laced through with geography. My cousin in the Czech Republic, who grew up in Prague, did not expect a big move when he entered university two years before me. The best school for his interest in translation was Charles University, also located in Prague, and the best housing option for his student budget was his own childhood bedroom. For him, the prospect of spending his university years in the same city where he had spent his high school years did not entail existential angst. But the vastness and variety of the United States had been imprinted in my imagination, not his, and the need to explore new corners of this place was one I couldn’t shake no matter how happy he seemed to be at home.I entered the Yard that first day through Johnston Gate with a single heavy backpack in tow and a friend along to say goodbye. In those first few familiar steps, there was no trace of the trepidation I had wanted to feel on my first day at college. My parents hadn’t come to see me off, being at work and having no doubt they would see me again within a few days — or whenever they wanted, for the next four years. But after my friend turned to walk back through the gate and I turned toward the enthusiastic upperclassmen beaming at me from behind a makeshift “Welcome to Dorm Crew!” sign, this sense of comfort suddenly disappeared. I was lost, in the same Yard where I had spent so many late afternoons lounging with friends from high school. The dorm crew captains who handed me my keys began to steer me toward Hollis with gentle smiles reserved for round-eyed, new freshmen from far away, and I didn’t stop them. I had no idea where Hollis was.My sense of displacement in a physical space I thought I knew so well would continue for the first few months I lived at Harvard. Mostly, I felt as though someone had blindfolded me and spun me in endless circles before releasing me in the middle of Harvard Square, which now wobbled out of focus, presenting new topsy-turvy dimensions wherever I looked. Every morning that I looked out from my window in Pennypacker Hall to see the back of the Old Cambridge Baptist Church was an exercise in balancing two different worlds inside my head. This was the same church I used to pass on trips to BerryLine or walks to Central Square, part of the backdrop of high school years spent exploring Cambridge on foot with friends. Now it was on the outside, while I sat inside a dorm whose tiny triangle shower and bunked beds I had never imagined in countless strolls past this building.Over the past four years, I have regained some sense of balance between these dimensions. The isolated, often inward-looking Harvard worlds I discovered during my freshman year feel like they have opened up to become part of the broad landscape of Cambridge as I know it. I meet friends to study in Kirkland Dining Hall or Café Gato Rojo as often as I go to the 1369 in Inman Square or Darwin’s on Mount Auburn Street.While the brick-walled barriers between Harvard and the larger Cambridge community remain mostly intact, I appreciate the luxury of being able to move between them now. I also appreciate the insight this has afforded me — that one physical location can represent multiple different worlds offering endless new experiences. I did not get to move outward, to explore the greener pastures and larger cities outside Cambridge. But in staying here I have been able to move inward, to explore instead the corners and complexities of this place.last_img read more

Read More
28 Sep
2020

Brisbane homes shine in new series

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:29Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhich home from The Block would you pick?00:29AN immigration facility turned luxury residential development and a Queenslander renovated by a prominent Brisbane architect will star in the new season of Open Homes Australia beginning next week.Season two airs on 9Life on November 3, with former The Block contestants Michael and Carlene Duffy again at the hosting helm.And Brisbane properties will dominate the series.Open Houses Australia hosts Carlene and Michael DuffyThe local celebrity couple, who are still renovating their own home, said the episodes would take on a new one hour format, with new cooking and landscaping segments.Carlene said the new season would also include more properties and more design ideas.“And plenty of eye candy,” she laughed, clarifying that she meant of the property kind, not her husband.“There is quite a few Queenslanders (houses),” she said. “There is one with (Brisbane architect) Shaun Lockyer whose designs we just love.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:41Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:41 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p270p270p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenOpen Houses Australia – Sneak Peek00:42Lockyer’s designs are often ultra modern, but Carlene said the renowned architect had “really elevated the century old Queenslander and added some real spunk”.“It was interesting to see his spin on it given his usual aesthetic,” she said.Another of Carlene’s favourites is Yungaba House – a 130-year-old landmark heritage building that has served as an immigration depot, an accommodation centre for “bush children”, a reception centre for returning Aussie troops, a war-time hospital, and a multicultural centre.Yungaba House is now a luxury residential complex“I actually did work experience at Yungaba when it was still a multicultural centre,” Carlene said.“Back then it was not in a good way but you could still see it had good bones.”Inside one of the Yungaba House residences.The stunning building has since been transformed in to luxury residences by developer, Fraser Property Australia.Also featuring on the show will be Three Chimneys House – Michael’s favourite of the series so far.Three Chimney House at Chandler“They used the materials we love – brick, timber, concrete,” he said.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus16 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market16 hours ago“And the way it was positioned around the gumtrees made it feel like it had been there for years.”Another house featuring on the show is an award-winning modern build by builders, Mancorp Quality Homes.Mancorp Quality Homes won the Brisbane House of the Year category for this showstopper at Bribie Island.That pool!Located at 41 Seaside Drive at Banksia Beach, the canal-front property was awarded House of the Year at the Master Builders Brisbane Housing and Construction Awards in July and also received the state award for Individual Home in the $1.26 million to $2 million category.And “Bellevue” at 5 Ross St in Paddington, which could easily be Brisbane’s most socially responsible house, will also feature in the series.Solaire Properties has set its sights on creating environmentally and socially responsible houses across Brisbane, with everything from energy-efficient lighting and Tesla technology to chain-of-custody timber used throughout Bellevue at Paddington.The couple said there was a property for every taste, with filming for the show continuing.As for their own home?“We are in the process of renovating our living room,” they said. “We are hoping to finish some more of our own home.”last_img read more

Read More
14 Aug
2020

Grace Mitchell named AV-CTL DIV player of year; Eric Adams named coach of year

first_imgBy Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow – The Wellington girls basketball team finished first in the Ark Valley Chisholm Trail League Div. IV and now come the accolades.The all league lists for both the boys and girls were made public Monday. In another first for the Crusader girls, the other AV-CTL teams were waiting for Wellington to finish off their season before the all-league lists were announced. Traditionally, all-league lists are not released until all teams in the league complete their seasons.Grace MitchellWellington Senior Grace Mitchell was named AV-CTL Div. IV player of the year. Eric Adams was named AV-CTL D-IV girls coach of the year.Eric AdamsJunior Lauryn Snipes and sophomore Avery Rusk joined Mitchell as first team players. Shayland French, a sophomore, and Tayland French, a junior, were named honorable mention.On the boys side, Wellington’s A.J. Snipes, a sophomore, was named to the AV-CTL Div. IV first team. Ian King, a sophomore, was second team and Connor Phelps, a senior, was named on the honorable mention team.Mitchell led the AV-CTL DIV in scoring with 21.7 ppg. She had 530 points for the season, a new WHS record, and was 182 of 341 for 53 percent from the field. She also had 167 rebounds.Lauryn Snipes averaged 13.1 ppg with 3.3 rebounds per game. Rusk average 10.5 ppg with 2.6 rpg. T. French led the team with rebounds getting 4.5 per game. S. Frenche had 4.1 rpg.Oh the boys side, A.J. Snipes was the leading scorer for the Crusaders and finished third in the league with 15.9 ppg while scoring 349 points for the season.Ian King had 12.5 ppg for the league’s eighth best average. Connor Phelps scored 8.9 ppg.Wellington girls finished 24-1 and finished third in Class 4A Div. IV. Wellington boys finished 11-11 and were sub-state runner ups.——— The final league standings are as follows: 24-1 2-8 0-10 22-3 10-0 18-4 Clearwater 7-3 12-9 Andale 6-4 11-11 9-14 10-11 Circle Clearwater Wellington League 4-6 0-10 W. Collegiate AV-CTL Div. IV Boys Mulvane Overall Mulvane 13-8 Andale 5-5 Circle 6-15 2-19 Overall League Wellington 4-6 9-1 Collegiate 1-20 9-1 4-6 9-13 Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments ———AV-CTL DIV full-team list:AV-CTL Div. IV – girlsFirst teamEmma Chambers, jr., Mulvane; Kadey Dreiling, sr., Andale; Kali Martin, jr., Circle; Grace Mitchell, sr., Wellington; Avery Rusk, so., Wellington; Lauryn Snipes, jr., Wellington. Second teamJaiden Easter, sr., Andale; Loan’Anh Johnson, so., Collegiate; Caylie Kifer, sr., Circle; Alli Klausmeyer, jr., Clearwater; Kirby Krumsick, jr., Collegiate; Hayley Reibenspies, sr., Clearwater. Honorable mention Carissa Beck, fr., Circle; Jill Bergkamp, jr., Andale; Emily Dennison, sr., Circle; Shayland French, so., Wellington; Tayland French, jr., Wellington; Nia Tolbert, sr., Collegiate; Reagan Wilson, sr., Circle. AV-CTL Div. IV – boyssFull list:Division IVFirst teamJeffery Ast, sr., Andale; Cameron Christian, sr., Collegiate; Cal Hartley, jr., Circle; Cody McNerney, so., Collegiate; AJ Snipes, so., Wellington; Clint Walstad, sr., Andale. Player of the year: Cameron Christian, Collegiate. Coach of the year: Jeff Buchanan, Andale.Second teamPete Carney, sr., Andale; Brendon Horyna, sr., Circle; Ian King, so., Wellington; Jack Larsen, sr., Collegiate; Kincaid Liebenberg, jr., Clearwater; Jacob Newlin, sr., Collegiae.Honorable mentionBrandon Bates, sr., Clearwater; Parker Bruce, so., Andale; Cody Eastridge, sr., Circle; Collin Ellis, jr., Clearwater; Drew Ellis, fr., Mulvane; Zach Meyer, jr., Andale; Cameron Parr, sr., Circle; Connor Phelps, sr., Wellington; Kendall Reed, sr., Collegiate. Follow us on Twitter. AV-CTL DIV Girlslast_img read more

Read More