2 Mar
2021

For Rebelution, Everything Is ‘Falling Into Place’

first_imgReggae rockers Rebelution have released their fifth studio album, Falling Into Place. The Santa Barbara-based group has been making music together for more than twelve years and has managed to maintain a consistent sound without going stale. Released on the band’s own 87 Music label in partnership with NYC’s Easy Star Records (just as with their last album “Count Me In”), Falling Into Place is a cohesive display of bandmates rooted in reggae, yet comfortable enough to experiment with their collective influences, including dancehall, hip-hop, and funk.Listen to the album below, streaming via Spotify.Never shy about singing for and about the ladies, frontman Eric Rachmany delivers racy lines like “Slap on some reggae, get the room to bubble up / So I can work your body from sundown to sun up” in the sensual tune “Pretty Lady.” The equally sultry “Santa Barbara” is a love song dedicated to a wild-eyed one that got away, as well as the city where it all began for Rebelution. “Upper Hand” bemoans a power struggle, and while some critics have been quick to call this track “pop”-y, others have come to the band’s defense to explain that what we’re hearing is traditional Jamaican dancehall-inspired beats. Speaking of haters, Rachmany explained on his live stream of the album this past Thursday, that the opening track, “Know It All,” is a big middle finger to all those who spew hate online, hiding cowardly behind their computer screens. Preach it! (Before learning this, the fan theory that this song was about Donald Trump was also hilariously viable…)A Rebelution album would be incomplete without a solid ganja anthem or two, and “Inhale Exhale” is just that. This song features Jamaican reggae artist Protoje, and gives a shout-out to the impressive lift provided by cannabis from California, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, and of course, Jamaica. Nothing will quite top 2007’s “Green To Black,” but it’s still a dope track that will no doubt incite the urge to spark one up, if you hadn’t already.Things get personal on “Those Days,” which Rachmany professed is his personal favorite, and features a chord progression he developed before Rebelution even existed. This autobiographical track really gives listeners a peek into the frontman’s upbringing in San Francisco. Influenced by the Bay area rap, hip-hop, and funk of his childhood, “Lay My Claim” is his second favorite, and is both inspirational and cocky (in the best sense of the word). The album concludes with “Breakdown,” a cautionary tune pleading us to slow down and enjoy time, as we have it.Overall, Falling Into Place delivers the feel-good vibes we’ve grown to depend on, along with fresh energy and the confidence that comes from being one of the most well known and loved reggae roots bands in the game. This release, combined with a supporting summer tour, will assuredly capture the hearts of a wide array of old and new fans all across the country.You can purchase a physical or digital copy of the album here. Sit back, relax, and let the music get up in ya!last_img read more

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17 Jan
2021

Farmers Markets

first_imgFarmers markets are popping up across the state. And as the summer harvest nears, they’ll be offering fresh produce and a chance for patrons to get to know the local farmers who grow their food. The Riverside Farmers Market in Roswell, Ga., will open for its fourth season on May 14. It draws more than 1,000 people each Saturday morning to shop and listen to live music, said Louise Estabrook, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Fulton County and manager of the market. “It’s the place to be, where farmers and consumers meet face to face and everyone is the better for it,” she said.All of the more than 50 vendors at the market only sell Georgia products. The market, which now accepts EBT cards, served 26,000 patrons last year, she said. Besides farmers selling produce, meats, honey, flowers, nursery plants and eggs, there are bakers and salsa vendors as well as others with prepared foods. “We have 140 farmers markets in the state registered on Georgia Marketmaker,” said Kent Wolfe, director of the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. “These markets benefit everybody – not just the farmers and consumers, but the local businesses as well.” Marketmaker does not include the 12 state farmers markets found in Atlanta, Augusta, Macon, Savannah, Thomasville, Cairo, Cordele, Glennville, Jesup, Moultrie and Valdosta. Markets across the state are looking to provide access to all citizens. According to Wolfe, the WIC Farmers Market Nutrition Program is available in 65 markets statewide. The program equated to nearly $1 million in FMNP funds used to purchase Georgia-grown fruits and vegetables in 2009. A similar program for seniors will serve an estimated 11,000 Georgians this year, supplying $250,000 in fresh, local foods. The Athens Farmers Market is already open for the year. The producer-only market offers fresh produce from local growers. Amanda Tedrow, UGA Extension agent in Athens-Clarke County, helps organize the market. “The market is a great way for the consumers to interact with the farmers directly,” Tedrow said. “They learn about products they may not be familiar with, like kohlrabi, and learn new recipes.” Local chefs offer weekly cooking demonstrations featuring foods available at the market. UGA-trained Master Gardeners are on hand to answer questions ranging from composting to canning.“People are looking for home-grown, local foods,” said Ronnie Barrentine, UGA Extension agent in Pulaski County, which is located in middle Georgia. “The problem is not that we don’t have the demand. It is having the amount of produce.” Barrentine started a market in downtown Hawkinsville on Saturdays in the summer, a trend that began in 2004. Plans are to open daily soon. Before this market, growers traveled to markets in Cordele or Macon to sell their goods. When the Henry County Farmers Market opened in 2009 in south metro Atlanta, UGA Extension agent Frank Hancock didn’t know what to expect. The first day, 50 people were lined up waiting for the market to start. “Everybody likes the market,” Hancock said. “We are focused on our goal of providing our farmers with a place to sell their goods and local citizens a place to buy fresh produce. Our market is growing.” The market sells produce grown within a 50-mile radius of the county, all freshly picked. Vendors also offer freshly baked breads, homemade jellies, ice cream and salsas. Fresh flowers are available, too. A couple hundred people stop in to purchase goods on Thursday afternoons. Susan Howington, UGA Extension coordinator in Henry County, also conducts cooking demonstrations and food preservation classes at the Henry County market. “The local people here in Henry County are benefiting and so are our local farmers because we are keeping it right here in our community,” Howington said. To find a farmers market near you, visit www.pickyourown.org/GAfarmersmarkets.htm or www.localharvest.org.last_img read more

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18 Dec
2020

LIRR Trains to Greenport Extended Through Thanksgiving Weekend

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island Rail Road trains to Greenport will continue through Thanksgiving weekend instead of Columbus Day, allowing weekend warriors another six weeks to enjoy harvest season in North Fork farm country.MTA officials announced Monday that Greenport service will also start in early May instead of Memorial Day. May to November service is a change from the Memorial Day to Columbus Day schedule the LIRR set for the Greenport line to cut costs during a budget crisis three years ago.“Fall has become a very popular season on the North Fork,” said LIRR President Helena Williams. “We’re glad we can provide the extra service for our customers,”The East End and the North Fork especially are destination in autumn as day trippers flock to farm stands and wineries across the region.The added trains include a 10:35 a.m. or 3:37 p.m. eastbound train from the Ronkonkoma station to Greenport and a 1:11 p.m. and 6:11 p.m. westbound train back.For more information on LIRR service, call 511 or visit the LIRR’s website at www.mta.info/lirr.last_img read more

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16 Dec
2020

‘Cool Downtowns’ Won’t Cut It If Long Island’s Millennials Can’t Afford to Live, Work and Play Here

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York All too often when the subject is Long Island’s millennial population, the topic is only addressed rhetorically at best: “What do Millennials Want?” “Why Are Millennials Different?” Or, tellingly, “Where Will Millennials Live?”These questions are genuine but the discourse never draws any significant conclusion.Policymakers, stakeholders and developers need to realize that millennials here—and across the country—want what every generation that came before them has wanted: decent housing at a fair price, and a good paying job. Not much mystery there, yet our region continually struggles with these issues.Throw into the mix the ever-ominous phrase “Brain Drain,” and what you get are buzzwords and inertia. The Brain Drain, a topic which I’ve written on at length, is a multifaceted excuse for developers, policymakers and whoever else is itching to put a shovel in the ground, to justify their projects.A quick look into the actual population statistics reveals the fact that LI is experiencing a “birth dearth,” a natural cycle that highlights lower birth rates. Further research also yields another interesting trend—seemingly every area is experiencing a “brain drain” of some kind. The pressing question that none of these policymakers or stakeholders ask is: if every county, town and village is experiencing a brain drain, where, exactly, are these young people winding up?Since I’ve started writing on the topic (and will continue to do so!), the narrative on the Island is starting to recognize the birth dearth theory, which was popularized locally by progressive planners such as Seth Forman.Recently, Amanda Fiscina, a former classmate of mine at Fordham University, wrote a compelling column for Newsday entitled “Where Should 20-Somethings on Long Island Live?”  By focusing on actions that can be taken like approving mixed-use zoning and supplying more apartments and co-ops, she offered a fresh take on topics that have been beaten to death by vested interests.LI’s millennials, often the focal point of development strategies from both local government and private enterprise, need more affordable options. Instead of merely arguing for “cool downtowns” as so many think pieces on the subject tend to do, Fiscina argues for smart incentives to promote greater diversity of housing stock and suggests realistic means for millennials to build equity while remaining in the region.Time and time again, policymakers, and the nonprofits, developers and the stakeholders who local leaders task with addressing this supposedly critical issue all say the same thing. If you build it, they will come—“cool downtowns” with restaurants, rooftop bars, bus-rapid transit and so on—with little to no consideration on how, exactly, the millennials who are being targeted with these “destinations” will be able to frequent those places being built. Millennials on Long Island need decent job opportunities, not organic spas that they can barely afford.Fiscina hit a nerve when she wrote: “The lack of housing choices is pushing millennials off the Island or to move in with their families. It’s time to stop judging when we pick those two options if Long Island won’t build what we need.”She’s right—we’re not building what millennials really need. Our regional economy must be diversified. Retail expansion is what passes for economic development, but few millennials loaded down with student loan debt can support a “cool” lifestyle on LI on retail wages alone. It’s time to adapt the Island’s suburbia to the employment trends and economic demands of the 21st century.As our hospitality and retail industries swell, other occupations offering higher salaries and better opportunities for educated residents continue either to decline, as is the case of local manufacturing, or struggle to establish a foothold in the Nassau-Suffolk region. Our current transit-oriented boom is rooted in sound planning principles, but the region must go further. It is one thing to build rental housing, but if it isn’t affordable for the supposed target audience, then what good is it?Fortunately, there is hope. Efforts to incubate new technology firms from non-profit groups such as Accelerate Long Island and LaunchPad Huntington, and a renewed focus by the Rauch Foundation to help coordinate the Island’s prestigious research institutions may attract attention from the right business sectors and lead to job creation. Let’s take it to the next level by synchronizing the approach of local Industrial Development Agencies to accompany the endeavors of the Long Island Association. If LI’s municipalities no longer have to compete with one another, our region will be free to stave off bigger threats from other states.As a result, millennials may finally get the creative solutions to the complex problems vexing them here today.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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16 Sep
2020

Syracuse outworked on glass in 71-59 loss to No. 14 Buffalo

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments Published on December 18, 2018 at 11:47 pm Contact Billy: [email protected] | @Wheyen3center_img With about seven minutes left on Tuesday, Buffalo’s Davonta Jordan slid inside Syracuse’s Oshae Brissett. Jordan, a 6-foot-2 guard, stands six inches shorter than Brissett. But as UB’s Jeremy Harris rose up for a 3-pointer, Jordan established inside position near the left block. When Harris’ shot missed and deflected directly toward the left block, Jordan leaped up for the ball, came down with it and went back up to finish. His bucket broke a tie, put the Bulls up two and they never trailed again.“Coming into this game, we just knew we played harder than (Syracuse),” Jordan said. “Play hard, and things just fall right into place.”Syracuse (7-4) struggled to gather defensive rebounds all game during its 71-59 loss to No. 14 Buffalo (11-0). The Bulls hauled in 18 offensive rebounds and won the overall battle of the glass, 48-35. Syracuse is the tallest team in the country, per KenPom, but the Orange hold a rebounding margin over their opponents of just plus-4 this year. The 18 offensive boards from Buffalo on Tuesday were the most the Orange have allowed this season, and it cost them in their second-straight nonconference loss at home.It started right from the game’s opening possession. CJ Massinburg missed a jumper but gathered his own offensive rebound. Syracuse’s Elijah Hughes blocked Massinburg on his ensuing shot, but it was a sign of things to come.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBuffalo couldn’t cash in on the offensive glass early, as another possession a few minutes later finished with two misses from an offensive board in between. It gave the Bulls hope, though, believing they could win even though shots hadn’t fallen in the first half, they said after the game. But more than anything, it showed Syracuse’s centers still weren’t up to snuff.It’s been a topic of conversation all season. Head coach Jim Boeheim has criticized his centers after almost every game. Two losses in a row, to two mid-major opponents, Syracuse has been outrebounded by smaller opposition. Again, Boeheim harped on his centers’ play.“Our centers have not gotten better,” Boeheim said. “That’s pretty glaring right now.”The Bulls had to cash in eventually, and about three minutes into the second half, they started to. Harris missed a 3 but Jordan gathered in his first offensive rebound. In the second chance opportunity, Jordan got an open 3 and knocked it down. Syracuse had allowed the 6-foot-2 guard to grab an offensive rebound, even though he was shorter than all five of SU’s players on the floor.“They play a small lineup but they rebound well out of it,” Boeheim said.As Buffalo came back from its four-point halftime deficit, its offensive rebounding went dry. But that wasn’t Syracuse’s doing. Rather, the Bulls finally began to hit shots. Buffalo wasn’t changing its approach. It hindered SU’s fast break possibilities, as Boeheim pointed out that if a team can’t rebound, it can’t run. And as the Bulls had all game, they sent three or four guys to the glass every time.“They’re a physical team so they were just able to get inside position,” SU’s Jalen Carey said. “That’s things we got to learn off of. We want to rebound, and once we rebound, that’s able to get us into our offense. We want to get up and down. We had a little bit of trouble with it today, and as you could see, that’s why the game stayed the way it was.”But there was one more offensive rebound waiting to do Syracuse in. With under three minutes to go, Harris shot another 3 and missed, again. But UB’s 6-foot-8 Nick Perkins rose up along the right side of the lane. Marek Dolezaj, 6-foot-10, was in at center for Syracuse. Brissett was nearby, as were 6-foot-6 guards Elijah Hughes and Tyus Battle. It didn’t matter. Perkins rose above them all to snatch the ball.Two passes later, Massinburg sliced down the lane, spun and finished high off the glass. Buffalo didn’t cash in on all of its offensive boards, finishing with 12 second-chance points off of 17 offensive rebounds. But with Syracuse down five, less than three minutes to go and an absolutely necessary rebound suspended in mid-air, Syracuse didn’t want it enough. Perkins did.“I thought they were tougher than us,” Boeheim said, “the last 10 minutes especially.”last_img read more

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8 Sep
2020

Peter Rufai Heads ASFU Organising Committee

first_imgAs the much anticipated preliminary round of matches of the maiden African Students Football Union (ASFU) Championship kick off in Ijebu Ode and Ibadan from tomorrow, former Super Eagles captain and goalkeeper, Peter Rufai Has been nominated as the chairman of Main Organising Committee.According to the President of ASFU, Professor Seun Omotayo, other notable former internationals involved in the project as ambassadors include; Julius Aghahowa and Seyi Olofinjana are ambassadors. The programme is expected to attract students from other countries especially along the west coast of Africa.Professor Omotayo disclosed that the duo of Aghahowa and Olofinjana had donated trophies for the highest goal scorer and that if he overall winner of the tournament. Peter Rufai Omotayo said the championship, which is an invitational one, would be used as a qualifier for the World Students Football League which will come up later this year.According to the organisers, Group A, has teams from Tai Solarin University of Education, Edo State University, Kenyatta University, Lagos State University and the University of Lagos. They will play their matches at the Dipo Dina International Stadium, Ijebu Ode.In Group B which will be based at the Adamasingba Stadium, Ibadan teams from University of Ibadan, Ahmadu Bello University, Ayo Babalola University, University of Tamale from Ghana and a university from Zimbabwe.Semifinals and the final matches would be held on 26 and 27 January at the Agege Stadium respectively.The participating institutions are; Lagos State University, University of Ibadan, University of Lagos, University of Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Kenyatta University, Kenya, Joseph Ayo Babalola University, University of Zimbabwe, Bulawayo and Edo State University.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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