4 Jun
2021

Details of free summer camps at LIT and MIC revealed

first_imgLinkedin Mary Immaculate College (MIC) and Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) have announced details of their FREE ‘EMPOWER’ Summer Camps, which will take place this July and will be open to second-level students in transition year, fifth year and sixth year.The 5 day ‘EMPOWER’ Summer Camp programme in entrepreneurship, creativity, design skills and innovation, is funded by the HEA and is being run collaboratively between MIC and LIT in both their Limerick and Tipperary Campuses :  Limerick: 10th to 14th July and Tipperary: 17th to 21st JulyThe programme has been designed with the aim of developing skills in young people to embrace innovation, enhance and develop creativity, problem solving and critical thinking skills, through a variety of hands-on collaborative scientific thinking and entrepreneurial thinking activities, and projects. There will also be a focus on developing effective leadership and communication skills and providing the students with the opportunity to meet and network with a variety of inspirational leaders and innovators during the 5 days.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up According to Dr Maeve Liston, Director of Enterprise and Community Engagement, MIC, “The camps will also further compliment the principles of the Junior and Senior Cycles in our second level education system through high quality hands-on interactive informal learning experiences, promoting innovation, communication, personal effectiveness, critical and creative thinking, and working with others all of which are prioritised in the Framework for Junior and Senior Cycle Education.”Gillian Barry, Head of Innovation & Enterprise at LIT stated that, “This is very much a collaborative effort in enhancing the skills needs in the region where LIT and MIC are working with Entrepreneurs and academics together with organisations like Junior Achievement Ireland, Foroige, Coder Dojo, Local Enterprise Offices, and a wide variety of community groups, organisations, schools, business’ and industry. We have collaborated specifically with entrepreneurs and experts in the fields of enterprise & innovation, education, youth development, community development, creativity and leadership on the design and delivery of what is ensured to be a high quality educational programme.” She added that the programme is designed to have a high impact it will be an immersive, social and fun experience for the week with opportunities to create skills and friendships for life. Facebook MIC Lecturer Elected to Board of International Society for Music Education Limerick Post Show | FOLM Project MIC Student Experience Virtual Sessions RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsEducationDetails of free summer camps at LIT and MIC revealedBy Editor – June 10, 2017 1809 Twitter Email Print TAGSEMPOWER summer campsLITMIC International Women’s Day LIT Interested parties can register via Eventbrite.https://www.eventbrite.com/e/empower-summer-limerick-region-tickets-34948387568Places are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.For further info contact: [email protected] and/or [email protected] Advertisement New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland WhatsApp MIC Teams Up with GPA on New Scholarship Scheme for Postgraduate Students Previous articleLimerick baritone for Lyric Opera WeimarNext articleLimerick Social Democrats condemn mosque attacks Editor last_img read more

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31 Dec
2020

Doosan Heavy, Korea National Oil to build 200MW floating offshore wind farm in South Korea

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renews.biz:Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction is to collaborate with Korea National Oil Corporation on the development of a floating offshore wind farm off the coast of South Korea.The two companies have signed a memorandum of understanding to develop the [200MW] Donghae 1 floating project, which will form part of a 6GW complex off Ulsan and south-east region of the country.Work is scheduled to start on the complex in stages from 2023, Doosan said.The partners said that through the agreement Korea National Oil Corporation will develop the wind farm, while sharing business plans and licensing matters, with Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction providing the turbines for the project.Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction president Jeong Yeon-in said: “We will do our best to promote the business successfully by adding Doosan Heavy’s offshore wind power technology to Korea National Oil Corporation’s will to foster the floating offshore wind industry. We will improve the technology of offshore wind power suitable for the environment and contribute to vitalizing the domestic industrial ecosystem.”More: Korean duo form floating offshore pact Doosan Heavy, Korea National Oil to build 200MW floating offshore wind farm in South Korealast_img read more

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30 Dec
2020

Turn It Off

first_img“You’ve got to be kidding me.”I dumped the contents of my dry bag onto the ground, picking through the soggy candy wrappers and first aid supplies until not a single item had gone unturned.“Daddio, let’s go!” my friend shouted from the river’s edge.It was six o’clock. Daylight was fading fast. Our group of three had decided not two hours earlier that we would try to squeeze in a lap down the Big Sandy, a class IV-V run at the heart of the Cheat River watershed. I’d waited an entire year to run this classic stretch of West Virginia whitewater, arranging my travels so I could be in the area when spring flows peaked. Though we’d be pressed for time, I was excited to get my personal first descent (PFD) and document the adventure with my trusty sidekick, a GoPro Hero 3+.The only problem? I’d forgotten the GoPro mount.“Dude, what took you so long?” my friend asked as I finally situated myself in the cockpit of my kayak and slid into the water.“I was looking for my GoPro mount,” I said.“Well, where is it?”“I forgot it.”My friend’s eyes widened. He rammed my boat with the bow of his.“What do you mean you forgot it,” he asked? “How are we gonna get shots of you coming off Wonder Falls?”“That’s not what it’s about,” I said, hardly convincing myself. “Let’s just paddle.”We set off downstream, and for the first half hour, I barely took notice of the immense rock walls rising from the river and the golden sunlight peeking over the treetops—I was too busy kicking myself for forgetting that stupid piece of plastic.In my mind, I could see the picture that I’d never have: the spray of Wonder Falls against an early evening haze, my green boat soaring off the lip of that glorious 20-footer, blade planted firmly, face part-bewildered, part-determined. No. There would be none of that. There would be no evening GoPro viewing over a round of beers, no posting a photo of my first waterfall run to Instagram, no proof that I’d even paddled the Big Sandy at all save for a bloody knuckle and my friend’s word.So would anyone believe that it had happened at all?This isn’t the first time I’ve struggled with being in the moment and wanting to document it, too. I once hiked for two hours in the dark to shoot a sunrise, only to realize at the summit that I’d left my camera battery plugged into the wall back home. And while, eventually, I was able to get past my irritation and enjoy the picturesque morning in technology-free, unadulterated bliss, I couldn’t help but let one dangerous thought sneak into my consciousness—I got up at 3 a.m. to hike for nothing.Of course, it wasn’t for nothing. While there would be no mountaintop selfie to share with my friends on Facebook, the scene of the rising sun illuminating the valley floor remains imprinted in my memory as clear as if I had seen it yesterday. Still, it got me thinking: why was I up there anyway? Was it really for the sunrise?There’s no denying that the reach of social media has extended far beyond our screens. Adventure photographers like Corey Rich and Renan Ozturk post to Instagram amid the world’s most extreme settings. From the Dawn Wall of El Capitan to the high altitude peaks of Myanmar in Southeast Asia, armchair travelers can revel in the exotic and the epic without ever leaving their desktop. These days, social media is inescapable, seemingly as essential to adventure as the adventure itself.But is that necessarily a bad thing? While it could be argued that social media platforms have taken away the mysteries of the world and exploited our natural playgrounds, particularly designated wilderness areas, is it possible to make the case that social media has actually played an important role in getting more people outside?Mike Cordaro is an active Strava user, but says the app doesn't dictate his time in the woods...mostly.Mike Cordaro is an active Strava user, but says the app doesn’t dictate his time in the woods…mostly.“It’s a double-edged sword for sure,” says Mark Eller, communications director for the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) and mastermind behind the online forum MTB Project.Eller has spent the better part of his life on a set of wheels. Just a few years ago, however, his obsession with riding took a different turn when he downloaded a new social media app designed with the competitive rider (and runner) in mind: Strava.Touted as an all-encompassing fitness app that logs everything from calories burned to GPS coordinates, Strava certainly isn’t the only app of its kind. But its ability to break down rides into segments and put users’ times against each other on a digital leaderboard has spurred a new generation of athletes to go hard in pursuit of their rightful place atop the cyber podium as King of the Mountain (or KOM).“We call them ‘Stravaletes’,” says New River Bikes owner Andrew Forron. “That or ‘Strava-assholes.’”If you couldn’t tell, Forron’s not the biggest fan of Strava. In fact, should you find yourself on a group ride in the New River Gorge with Forron at the helm, don’t be surprised if he asks you to turn it off. If you don’t, consider this: he’s not afraid to do it for you.“I think it’s terrible,” Forron says about Strava. “I think it’s changed how people interact together when they go places. It used to be when you went somewhere, you went to the bike shop, met the folks there, and tried to get in on their after-work ride.”Now, Forron says, cyclists don’t need the bike shop community to find the cool local loops in town—all they need is a little cell coverage and a Strava account.“It creates a false sense of community,” Forron adds, “and it’s caused more people to ride alone.”Though there’s undoubtedly some truth in Forron’s claim, for riders like Eller, Strava affords ambitious individuals an outlet for that need for speed.“It allows you to have a competitive riding experience wherever you are, whether you’re with someone else or not,” Eller says of the fitness app. “I’m a dad with a three-year-old and a six-year-old, and for a number of years, I haven’t been able to go out to races. Strava opened the door to get that competitive vibe back in my riding.”Mike Cordaro of Mount Pleasant, Penn., couldn’t agree more. Look up any route on Strava in the southwestern corner of Pennsylvania and Cordaro’s name is likely somewhere near the top five. In total, Cordaro’s racked up over 50 KOMs on his home turf in preparation for this year’s National Ultra Endurance (NUE) series, and says the app has helped him keep track of his weekly averages (three rides, 80 miles, seven and a half hours in the saddle).“I’m not chasing KOMs every time I go,” Cordaro says, “but it motivates me. I see other people ride [on Strava] and feel like I need to get after it.”And while Cordaro and Eller and, heck, even Forron, can agree that anything which motivates you to get on your bike is ultimately good, Strava has recently come under legal attack for influencing cyclists in particular to ride faster on trails that have no business being the stage for an unofficial time trial.“Public trails don’t necessarily make great race courses,” Eller says. “You have to be discerning about when and where it’s appropriate to gear your brains out.”“Strava’s not a reason to forgo trail etiquette,” Cordaro adds. “Ultimately, if [competitive cycling] is your goal, the best way to do that is racing.”Still, even Eller admits to allowing his competitive instincts to get the best of him, riding for weeks at a time without ever turning Strava off. But in a blog he posted on IMBA’s site titled “Confessions of a Strava Addict,” Eller brings up a good point, stating, “…it’s not like my nerdy geek posse wasn’t comparing times before Strava.” Whether by Garmin or by pencil and paper, mountain bikers have been keeping track of ride data for as long as mountain biking has existed.The only difference now? You can’t fudge the facts, something Maryland-based kayaker Ian Wingert knows all too well.Photo cred: Justin StephensPhoto cred: Justin StephensBack in early March, Wingert and two of his fellow paddlers, Todd Baker and Wyatt Hyndman, successfully navigated the first descent of Cucumber Falls outside of Ohiopyle, Penn. At almost 40 feet in height, Cucumber Falls isn’t the tallest waterfall to be run in the Laurel Highlands, but it’s likely the driest.“We knew it was going to run one to two days a year,” Wingert says. “We can’t really afford trips to Mexico or the Northwest, so when this came along, we knew we had to do it.”The crew had been scouting the line at Cucumber Falls for nearly three years but the water level was never high enough for an attempt. After a few days of heavy rain and snowmelt in late February 2015, however, the opportunity finally presented itself—it was now or never.With a friend setting safety at the bottom, all three paddlers styled clean lines over the drop. But it was in the pool below the falls that two of the three, Wingert included, got into trouble. A fallen log blocked the current’s main flow on river right, creating what’s referred to as a “strainer.” Though Wingert and Hyndman hit the log head-on, they flushed through and escaped unscathed. Baker altogether avoided the strainer and safely eddied out above, but as the three would soon find out, that log would prove to be the least of their problems.“The video made it look like we disregarded the fact that there was wood at the bottom and like we were disregarding safety,” Wingert says of the two-minute edit Baker compiled from their first descent footage.The video, which Wingert and Baker’s employer Immersion Research (one of the whitewater industry’s leading gear manufacturers) later posted to its Facebook page, attracted over 100,000 views and received nearly 2,000 shares in the first few hours of going live. The first descent was suddenly viral, but not without controversy.“Just dumb,” read one comment.“I’m calling that bad etiquette. Bad safety and stupid,” read another.Yet countless more comments rallied in defense of Wingert and his crew, arguing that, as with any adventure, not everything goes according to plan. Risk is inherent in any endeavor, especially when it comes to tackling first descents.Screen Shot 2015-03-05 at 1.05.17 PM“A lot of people who saw it as negative thought it was dumb luck, like we weren’t talented paddlers, just dumb kids with GoPros,” Wingert says. “It brought me down in the moment,” but not so much that he turned away from social media altogether.Whether he’s cranking out laps on the Top Yough in his backyard or making multi-day kayaking trips down to western North Carolina, Wingert is as active on social media as he is in a boat and says that Facebook in particular has been a useful tool in organizing paddling trips. What’s more, the ‘group’ function on Facebook allows area paddlers to post updates on rivers and creeks, notifying other river users about access issues, environmental threats, water levels, and, ironically, new strainers. A simple status update can rally a post-work group paddle. Stranded at the takeout without a shuttle?“It’s great for that kind of thing,” Wingert says. “It’s cool to see what everyone else is doing, unless you’re stuck at work and your friends are paddling.”While Wingert is hesitant to say whether or not he would ever attempt Cucumber Falls again, he is certain that his group won’t be the last. And as for the falls? A sign posted by state park officials the day after Wingert’s first descent now reads loud and clear.Cucumber Run closed to boating.Photo cred: Justin CostnerPhoto cred: Justin CostnerThe closure of Cucumber Run and the subsequent falls is just one of many instances where the power of social media has forced officials to respond in a way that’s not exactly favorable to outdoor enthusiasts. One of the biggest culprits these days? Instagram.“It’s a really touchy subject,” says western North Carolina-based photographer Justin Costner on shooting photography in public lands.Though Costner himself has never had any run-ins with the Forest Service, he’s heard enough horror stories about court dates and hefty legal fines that he’s taking the better-safe-than-sorry approach by purchasing a commercial photography permit.“I understand not violating the forest, but I think people should have the right to shoot photos from their adventures and trips,” he says.Costner, like any respectable outdoor recreationalist, practices Leave No Trace (LNT) principles and respects even the strictest of regulations in areas like the Linville Gorge Wilderness, but not all photographers are as considerate.In March 2014 for instance, popular Instagrammer Trevor Lee (@trevlee) was charged with nine misdemeanors for camping and climbing trees in undesignated areas of Yosemite in pursuit of a better angle. Later that same year, Casey Nocket (@creepytings) made national news when she posted Instagram photos of portraits she had painted on rocks in eight national parks. Though Nocket called it “art,” the park service had a different word for it: vandalism. Lee and Nocket are extreme examples of a gram-gone-bad, but their trials should serve as warning to Instagram users with tunnel vision for the perfect shot.In general, though, the average Instagram user is an amateur photographer with a trigger-happy finger and a desire to be inspired. That’s how Jessica Georgia (@jessicageorgia) came to decide to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail and document all 2,180 miles of the journey through her Instagram feed.“One of my passions and hobbies is photography,” Georgia says. “That’s initially what got me into Instagram, but then I started finding outdoor locations I didn’t even know existed.”From there, Georgia started getting inspired in a big way, and not just to take more photographs: hiking became her newfound love. The idea of thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail was romantic to Georgia, who, at 30 years old, is both a wife and a mother to a 12-year-old daughter. But when her family hiked through the Grayson Highlands during peak thru-hiking season, Georgia got the affirmation she needed that the A.T. was her calling.“It was so inspiring and I was so envious,” Georgia recalls, “but at the same time, I didn’t know if I could do it.”Yet just a year later, Georgia was taking her first steps along the white blaze at Springer Mountain. To ease the distance between mom-on-the-trail and family-at-home, Georgia says she tries to update her Instagram as frequently as possible so her daughter may be able to better grasp what a thru-hike actually entails.@jessicageorgia @jessicageorgiaTake a quick scroll through her feed and you’ll see the good and the bad of thru-hiking: swollen feet, bug bites, fellow hikers, trail angels, sweeping vistas. Following Georgia’s Instagram is about as close as you can get to hiking the trail yourself without ever leaving your home. And for Georgia, the supportive network of followers has been just as rewarding to her as the hike itself.“It’s encouraging when you can post something to Instagram and have people say, ‘That’s amazing Jess keep going!’ Having that community cheering you on is definitely a mental boost,” something that, as any thru-hiker can attest to, will surely brighten even the worst of days.Like Georgia, that sense of community is what I cherish about social media. Though my Facebook feed is often plagued with incoherent political and personal rants, it’s proven invaluable as a tool for making connections and finding story ideas. In fact, each and every one of the people I interviewed for this story were all contacted initially via social media, be it through Facebook or Instagram.But, as nearly all of my subjects pointed out, that’s not to say there aren’t pitfalls to the platforms. Do I think there’s such a thing as “oversharing”? Yes: I don’t need to see everything you eat. Do hashtags annoy me? When there are more hashtags than caption copy, most definitely. Does social media dictate the way I choose to spend my time in the outdoors?Absolutely not.As I sat atop that summit watching the rising of the sun, the weight of a battery-less camera sinking into my lap, I wasn’t thinking about the likes and comments I wouldn’t receive. I was thinking how damn lucky I was to be me in that moment witnessing one of the most overlooked miracles of this world.As Mark Eller from IMBA so simply put it, “People have to remember that you can turn it off if you want to.”So turn it off, if you want to.last_img read more

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26 Aug
2020

Doc Rivers can sympathize with Mike D’Antoni’s position

first_imgThe hits were coming from all angles, and with his team unable to mount a disproving retort, all Rivers could do was sit there and take it.“Obviously it’s not fun to go through,” Rivers recalled before his Clippers played the Lakers Thursday night at Staples Center.Sound familiar?Across the corridor, D’Antoni stood outside the Lakers locker room and fielded questions about a wounded, talent-deficient team currently barreling toward one of the worst finishes in franchise history.For fans and pundits thirsty for a perpetrator, D’Antoni is the embodiment of the Lakers struggles.Maybe he’s the long-term answer for the Lakers, maybe not.But to judge him based on the flawed roster he works with these days is about as fair and foolish as Simmons demanding Rivers’ head because he couldn’t turn Allan Ray into Ray Allen.These guys are coaches, not magicians.The Lakers’ problem is a lack of talent, not a lack of coaching.And in just a few more months, the talent issue can finally be addressed.The Lakers will have a max contract to lure a top free agent and a high draft pick to add a potential impact rookie.Or maybe they trade the draft pick to the Cleveland Cavaliers for reportedly unhappy point guard Kyrie Irving, then resist the free agent market this summer in favor of chasing Kevin Love in 2015.The point is, the luxury of payroll flexibility and a lottery pick await the Lakers.Not that it helps D’Antoni at the moment. He’s just trying to win a game.Rivers understands.“I respect anyone who goes through that because I’ve been through it.” Rivers said. “And it’s very, very difficult.”With the benefit of retrospect, we know Boston resisted outside pressure and stuck with Rivers. And history shows the following year the rebuilt Celtics rose all the way to the NBA Finals, where they beat the Lakers to win their 17th title in franchise history.In one calendar year the perception of Rivers was forever altered. He is now known as one of the great coaches in the NBA, and the Clippers ascent in the Western Conference is proof of his impact. But it wasn’t a change in philosophy that altered Rivers’ history.It was patience.And the plays he called the following year for Kevin Garnett were essentially the same he called for Brian Scalabrine.He didn’t change.The players did.“I believed in what we were doing. As far as our schemes, defensively and offensively,” Rivers said. “I knew we needed more players. But I liked what we were doing.”That conviction pulled Rivers through many a sleepless night.“You just have to believe in that,” Rivers said. “That’s the time not to question yourself.”Ironically, the draft lottery Ainge and Celtics fans pinned their hopes wasn’t a benefit.Another lesson their Lakers counterparts might want to heed.The Celtics finished with the fifth pick that summer, not the first or second. That left them out of the running for either Oden or Durant.“That was a bad moment, for sure,” Rivers said.Initially, anyway.Ultimately it moved them off Plan A and onto Plan B.Rather than build around a rookie they reached into the trade market to add proven veterans.They traded the fifth pick to the Seattle Supersonics for Allen, then traded six players to the Minnesota Timberwolves for Kevin Garnett.With a pair of future Hall of Famers now teamed with Paul Pierce, the Celtics rolled to the NBA Championship.And the perception of Rivers was forever changed.“Obviously it all fell together,” he said.Down the hall at Staples Center, D’Antoni was just trying to win a game.And maybe buy himself another season.He’s in an impossible position coaching terrible team beset by injury.You don’t have to explain that to Rivers, though.He’s been there. Upstairs in the front office, Celtics general manager Danny Ainge was feeling the heat too. But a top-heavy draft the following summer featuring college greats Greg Oden and Kevin Durant was his out card.With each loss improving the Celtics lottery chances, the Boston faithful consoled themselves with visions of Oden or Durant pulling them out of the darkness.And that bought Ainge time.It was different for Rivers, an outsider who elicited little confidence.In fact, well-known Celtics fan turned national columnist Bill Simmons penned one of the all-time spiteful articles in sports history when he sarcastically chastised Rivers and called for his firing. Prior to being anointed the respect befitting an NBA championship, Doc Rivers was — in a manner of speaking — Mike D’Antoni.It was the 2006-07 season and Rivers was the face of the perennially storied but presently horrible Boston Celtics.With the losses piling up and a proud fan base restless for a culprit, Rivers was an easy target.He had bombed previously with the Orlando Magic, and with the Celtics regressing rather than progressing there was sincere concern in Boston he was the right man for the job.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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26 Aug
2020

March Madness bracket projections: Kentucky, UNC shoot up to 2-seed line

first_imgMORE: Grant Williams, once overlooked, on verge of history with TennesseeAutomatic bids (in parenthesis) go to the team with the fewest conference losses. In case of a tie, the bid is given to the team with the best NET rating.Projected No. 1 seedsVirginia (ACC), Tennessee (SEC), Duke, Michigan (Big Ten)Virginia (20-1): NET/Pom/KPI: 1/1/3. vs. Q1: 6-1. vs. Q2: 5-0. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Tennessee (20-1): NET/Pom/KPI: 4/5/7. vs. Q1: 4-1. vs. Q2: 6-0. vs. Q3/4: 10-0Duke (20-2): NET/Pom/KPI: 3/2/1. vs. Q1: 5-1. vs. Q2: 5-1. vs. Q3/4: 10-0Michigan (21-2): NET/Pom/KPI: 6/6/4. vs. Q1: 5-2. vs. Q2: 7-0. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Projected No. 2 seedsGonzaga (WCC), Kentucky, North Carolina, Michigan StateGonzaga (21-2): NET/Pom/KPI: 2/3/11. vs. Q1: 4-2. vs. Q2: 3-0. vs. Q3/4: 14-0Kentucky (19-3): NET/Pom/KPI: 5/8/6. vs. Q1: 6-2. vs. Q2: 3-1. vs. Q3/4: 10-0North Carolina (18-4): NET/Pom/KPI: 8/7/5. vs. Q1: 5-4. vs. Q2: 6-0. vs. Q3/4: 7-0Michigan State (18-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 9/4/10. vs. Q1: 8-3. vs. Q2: 4-2. vs. Q3/4: 6-0Projected No. 3 seedsKansas, Purdue, Marquette, Houston (American)Kansas (17-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 17/16/2. vs. Q1: 8-5. vs. Q2: 5-1. vs. Q3/4: 4-0Purdue (16-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 11/10/9. vs. Q1: 5-5. vs. Q2: 5-1. vs. Q3/4: 6-0Marquette (19-4): NET/Pom/KPI: 21/28/15. vs. Q1: 6-3. vs. Q2: 3-1. vs. Q3/4: 10-0Houston (21-1): NET/Pom/KPI: 7/19/8. vs. Q1: 2-1. vs. Q2: 8-0. vs. Q3/4: 11-0MORE: Zion Williamson the runaway favorite for POYProjected No. 4 seedsLouisville, Virginia Tech, Iowa State, Texas TechLouisville (17-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 15/13/14. vs. Q1: 4-5. vs. Q2: 4-1. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Virginia Tech (18-4): NET/Pom/KPI: 10/9/25. vs. Q1: 3-3. vs. Q2: 5-1. vs. Q3/4: 10-0Iowa State (18-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 13/12/17. vs. Q1: 4-4. vs. Q2: 3-1. vs. Q3/4: 11-0Texas Tech (18-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 16/15/21. vs. Q1: 3-5. vs. Q2: 6-0. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Projected No. 5 seedsNevada (MWC), Villanova (Big East), Wisconsin, IowaNevada (21-1): NET/Pom/KPI: 14/17/18. vs. Q1: 0-0. vs. Q2: 8-0. vs. Q3/4: 13-1Villanova (18-4): NET/Pom/KPI: 18/18/13. vs. Q1: 3-2. vs. Q2: 7-2. vs. Q3/4: 8-0Wisconsin (16-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 12/11/20. vs. Q1: 5-4. vs. Q2: 5-2. vs. Q3/4: 6-0Iowa (17-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 23/23/32. vs. Q1: 3-5. vs. Q2: 5-0. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Projected No. 6 seedsKansas State (Big 12), Maryland, LSU, Florida StateKansas State (17-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 30/35/12. vs. Q1: 4-2. vs. Q2: 4-3. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Maryland (17-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 24/20/23. vs. Q1: 3-4. vs. Q2: 5-2. vs. Q3/4: 9-0LSU (17-4): NET/Pom/KPI: 19/24/16. vs. Q1: 3-2. vs. Q2: 6-2. vs. Q3/4: 8-0Florida State (17-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 29/21/24. vs. Q1: 3-3. vs. Q2: 4-2. vs. Q3/4: 10-0Projected No. 7 seedsBaylor, Mississippi State, Auburn, St. John’sBaylor (15-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 31/26/27. vs. Q1: 4-3. vs. Q2: 5-1. vs. Q3/4: 6-2Mississippi State (16-5): NET/Pom/KPI: 26/25/19. vs. Q1: 6-2. vs. Q2: 3-3. vs. Q3/4: 7-0Auburn (15-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 20/14/35. vs. Q1: 1-5. vs. Q2: 6-1. vs. Q3/4: 8-0St. John’s (17-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 40/47/28. vs. Q1: 4-4. vs. Q2: 4-0. vs. Q3/4: 9-2Projected No. 8 seedsWashington (Pac-12), Cincinnati, Oklahoma, SyracuseWashington (18-4): NET/Pom/KPI: 27/33/29. vs. Q1: 2-3. vs. Q2: 2-1. vs. Q3/4: 14-0Cincinnati (19-3): NET/Pom/KPI: 25/29/26. vs. Q1: 2-1. vs. Q2: 4-1. vs. Q3/4: 13-1Oklahoma (15-8): NET/Pom/KPI: 38/40/22. vs. Q1: 3-6. vs. Q2: 5-2. vs. Q3/4: 7-0Syracuse (16-7): NET/Pom/KPI: 47/33/33. vs. Q1: 2-3. vs. Q2: 4-2. vs. Q3/4: 10-2MORE: February could be month to remember in college basketballProjected No. 9 seedsMinnesota, TCU, Ohio State, Ole MissMinnesota (16-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 52/51/38. vs. Q1: 3-4. vs. Q2: 2-2. vs. Q3/4: 22-0TCU (15-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 37/37/34. vs. Q1: 0-5. vs. Q2: 5-1. vs. Q3/4: 10-0Ohio State (14-7): NET/Pom/KPI: 36/32/39. vs. Q1: 3-5. vs. Q2: 3-2. vs. Q3/4: 8-0Ole Miss (14-7): NET/Pom/KPI: 39/46/42. vs. Q1: 3-7. vs. Q2: 2-0. vs. Q3/4: 9-0Projected No. 10 seedsN.C. State, Buffalo, Arizona State, IndianaN.C. State (16-7): NET/Pom/KPI: 35/41/76. vs. Q1: 1-6. vs. Q2: 4-0. vs. Q3/4: 11-1Buffalo (18-3): NET/Pom/KPI: 22/22/31. vs. Q1: 2-1. vs. Q2: 2-2. vs. Q3/4: 14-0Arizona State (15-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 60/54/36. vs. Q1: 3-1. vs. Q2: 5-3. vs. Q3/4: 7-2Indiana (13-9): NET/Pom/KPI: 44/44/49. vs. Q1: 3-7. vs. Q2: 3-2. vs. Q3/4: 7-0Projected No. 11 seedsSeton Hall, Alabama, VCU, Temple, Texas, Wofford (Southern)Seton Hall (13-9): NET/Pom/KPI: 67/63/44. vs. Q1: 2-5. vs. Q2: 4-2. vs. Q3/4: 7-2*Alabama (13-8): NET/Pom/KPI: 45/48/37. vs. Q1: 2-5. vs. Q2: 6-1. vs. Q3/4: 5-2*VCU (15-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 49/53/40. vs. Q1: 1-3. vs. Q2: 2-2. vs. Q3/4: 12-1*Temple (16-6): NET/Pom/KPI: 53/76/43. vs. Q1: 1-5. vs. Q2: 5-0. vs. Q3/4: 10-1*Texas (12-10): NET/Pom/KPI: 41/30/30. vs. Q1: 4-5. vs. Q2: 2-3. vs. Q3/4: 6-2* First Four teams As we inch nearer to March Madness, we here at Sporting News are here to offer our best projections for the NCAA Tournament.As always with our Field of 68 bracket projection, we’re here to do our best to help you decide for yourself how your favorite team’s resume stacks up. This isn’t a projection of what the seed lines will look like on Selection Sunday, but it’s an educated guess at how the bracket would look if the season ended yesterday. MORE: Inside the minds of college basketball’s top scorersNo. 12 seeds: Davidson (A-10), Lipscomb (Atlantic Sun), Belmont (Ohio Valley), Hofstra (Colonial)No. 13 seeds: New Mexico State (WAC), Vermont (America East), South Dakota State (Summit), Old Dominion (C-USA)No. 14 seeds: Montana (Big Sky), Northern Kentucky (Horizon), Bowling Green (MAC) Loyola-Chicago (Missouri Valley)No. 15 seeds: Georgia State (Sun Belt), Radford (Big South), Princeton (Ivy), UC Irvine (Big West)No. 16 seeds: Bucknell (Patriot), Rider (MAAC) *Robert Morris (Northeast), *Sam Houston State (Southland), *Norfolk State (MEAC), *Prairie View A&M (SWAC)*First Four teamsNewbies: Belmont, Bowling Green, Bucknell, Davidson, Lipscomb, Montana, New Mexico State, Norfolk State, Old Dominion, Princeton, Robert MorrisDropped out: Lehigh, Liberty, Marshall, Murray State, North Carolina A&T, Saint Louis, UCF, UMKC, UNLV, Wagner, Weber State, YaleBubble boys (in alphabetical order): Arizona, Arkansas, Butler, Clemson, Creighton, Florida, Nebraska, San Francisco, UCF, UNCG, Utah Statelast_img read more

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12 Aug
2020

England bow out to Ireland

first_img4 October 2017 England start title defence with win over WalesEngland made a confident start to the defence of the Senior Women’s Home Internationals, beating the hosts, Wales, 5-3 at Newport.“It was a thrilling first day against tough opposition who were playing a course they all know really well,” said England captain Debbie Richards.England are aiming for their 11th overall win in this event and their fourth consecutive championship title.The team laid the foundations of today’s success in the morning foursomes. Aileen Greenfield and Julie Brown powered to a 6/4 win over their opponents, while Jackie Foster and Fiona Edmond – respectively the English senior stroke play and amateur champions – won 3/2.In the singles, Wales made a strong start but England soon got into their stride and won three of the five points on offer. Brown was again in a hurry, winning 7/5. Comfortable wins from Greenfield (4/3) and Foster (3/2) secured the match win for the European silver medallists.In the day’s other match, Ireland beat Scotland 6-2. Tomorrow England play Scotland and Wales play Ireland. “All the teams have very strong players so it will be another tough day tomorrow,” said Richards. 1 October 2017England set for defence of senior titleEngland will begin their defence of the Senior Women’s Home International title on Tuesday at Newport Golf Club, Wales.The six players who won the silver medal at last month’s European team championship are all in the side, together with Surrey’s Felicity Christine.The full team, captained by Debbie Richards of Surrey, is: Caroline Berry of Cheshire, Julie Brown of Staffordshire, Felicity Christine of Surrey, Fiona Edmond of Suffolk, Jackie Foster of Hertfordshire, Aileen Greenfield of Sussex and Lulu Housman of Middlesex.England have dominated the Senior Women’s Home Internationals since it started in 2003, winning the Sue Johnson Trophy 10 times, with consecutive wins in the last three years. The round robin competition against Scotland, Ireland and Wales continues until Thursday, 5 October.The players:Caroline Berry (Bromborough) was fifth in the British senior championship, is a past English senior champion and reached the semi-finals of this year’s event, having been top qualifier.Julie Brown (Trentham) won the 2015 British senior championship, was runner-up last year and fourth this season. She won the English senior title in 2014 and has represented England every year since then.Felicity Christine (Woking) is a past winner of the British senior title and had a top 20 finish last month. She was a quarter finalist in the English senior championship and fifth in the English senior stroke playFiona Edmond (Ipswich) was an England and GB&I international before a break of 25 years. She won the English senior title at her first attempt in May.Jackie Foster (Bishop’s Stortford) has won back-to-back English senior stroke play titles and had a top 20 finish in the British seniors.Aileen Greenfield (Pyecombe) is playing only her second full season of senior golf and has been runner-up three times in English championships.Lulu Housman (Wyke Green) won the English senior stroke play title in 2015. She was a semi-finalist in this year’s senior amateur and tied 11th in the stroke play. “It was a thrilling first day against tough opposition who were playing a course they all know really well,” said England captain Debbie Richards.England are aiming for their 11th overall win in this event and their fourth consecutive championship title.The team laid the foundations of today’s success in the morning foursomes. Aileen Greenfield and Julie Brown powered to a 6/4 win over their opponents, while Jackie Foster and Fiona Edmond – respectively the English senior stroke play and amateur champions – won 3/2.In the singles, Wales made a strong start but England soon got into their stride and won three of the five points on offer. Brown was again in a hurry, winning 7/5. Comfortable wins from Greenfield (4/3) and Foster (3/2) secured the match win for the European silver medallists.In the day’s other match, Ireland beat Scotland 6-2. Tomorrow England play Scotland and Wales play Ireland. “All the teams have very strong players so it will be another tough day tomorrow,” said Richards.England will meet Ireland in title showdownDefending champions England will meet Ireland tomorrow in the title decider at the Senior Women’s Home Internationals at Newport, Wales.Both teams have a 100% record of two wins from two matches so far, with England defeating Scotland 5.5-2.5 today, having previously beaten Wales 5-3.England captain Debbie Richards commented: “It will be a big day tomorrow for both teams as the winner will lift the trophy.”England are aiming for their fourth consecutive win and their 11th overall victory in this championship.Today, the team made a great start to the match, winning all three singles. “We had a fantastic start this morning,” said Richards. “Jackie Foster and Felicity Christie started the winning streak with a 6/5 victory, closely followed by Lulu Houseman and Caroline Berry winning by the same margin. Aileen Greenfield and Julie Brown battled away after a slow start to win 3/2.”In the afternoon singles the matches were very tight and after nine holes could have gone either way. But England fought hard in the windy and cold conditions to eventually secure a comfortable win.In the other match Ireland beat Wales 6-2, having previously beaten Scotland by the same margin.Click here for full scoresImage copyright The R&A England captain Debbie Richards, commented: “It was a very tense afternoon for the captains but some amazing golf was played by all and I am very proud of the England team and it has been an honour to be their captain. Hopefully we can go one step further next year.”England, who were seeking their 11th win and their fourth in a row, shared the points in the foursomes. Julie Brown and Aileen Greenfield continued their unbeaten record with their 5/4 win, while Lulu Housman and Caroline Berry snatched a half.In the singles Brown always had the upper hand but had to go to the 17th to win her point 3/1. Jackie Foster was three down after three but battled back to win on the 17th and put England ahead.But the Irish proved the stronger players over the closing stages of the other three games. Fiona Edmond lost by one hole, Berry by two holes and Housman was defeated by a 17th hole birdie, losing 3/1.In the day’s other match Wales and Scotland halved. Final placings: 1 Ireland, 2 England, 3 Wales, 4 Scotland.Caption – Back row from left, Caroline Berry (Bromborough, Cheshire), Felicity Christine (Woking, Surrey), Julie Brown (Trentham, Staffordshire), Aileen Greenfield (Pyecombe Sussex). Front row, from left: Jackie Foster (Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire), Debbie Richards (captain, Burhill, Surrey), Fiona Edmond (Ipswich, Suffolk), Lulu Housman (Wyke Green, Middlesex). (Image copyright The R&A). England will meet Ireland in title showdownDefending champions England will meet Ireland tomorrow in the title decider at the Senior Women’s Home Internationals at Newport, Wales.Both teams have a 100% record of two wins from two matches so far, with England defeating Scotland 5.5-2.5 today, having previously beaten Wales 5-3.England captain Debbie Richards commented: “It will be a big day tomorrow for both teams as the winner will lift the trophy.”England are aiming for their fourth consecutive win and their 11th overall victory in this championship.Today, the team made a great start to the match, winning all three singles. “We had a fantastic start this morning,” said Richards. “Jackie Foster and Felicity Christie started the winning streak with a 6/5 victory, closely followed by Lulu Houseman and Caroline Berry winning by the same margin. Aileen Greenfield and Julie Brown battled away after a slow start to win 3/2.”In the afternoon singles the matches were very tight and after nine holes could have gone either way. But England fought hard in the windy and cold conditions to eventually secure a comfortable win.In the other match Ireland beat Wales 6-2, having previously beaten Scotland by the same margin.Click here for full scoresImage copyright The R&A Almost every point in the title decider was closely contested before Ireland emerged as the 4.5-3.5 winners. It was their third win in the championship, following back-to-back successes in 2012/13. The team, captained by Debbie Richards of Burhill, Surrey, is: Caroline Berry of Bromborough, Cheshire, Julie Brown of Trentham, Staffordshire, Felicity Christine of Woking, Surrey, Fiona Edmond of Ipswich, Suffolk, Jackie Foster of Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire, Aileen Greenfield of Pyecombe, Sussex and Lulu Housman of Wyke Green, Middlesex.Click here for full scoresImage copyright leaderboard Photographycenter_img England captain Debbie Richards, commented: “It was a very tense afternoon for the captains but some amazing golf was played by all and I am very proud of the England team and it has been an honour to be their captain. Hopefully we can go one step further next year.”England, who were seeking their 11th win and their fourth in a row, shared the points in the foursomes. Julie Brown and Aileen Greenfield continued their unbeaten record with their 5/4 win, while Lulu Housman and Caroline Berry snatched a half.In the singles Brown always had the upper hand but had to go to the 17th to win her point 3/1. Jackie Foster was three down after three but battled back to win on the 17th and put England ahead.But the Irish proved the stronger players over the closing stages of the other three games. Fiona Edmond lost by one hole, Berry by two holes and Housman was defeated by a 17th hole birdie, losing 3/1. 1 Oct 2017 England bow out to Ireland Click here for full scores4 October 2017England will meet Ireland in title showdown Defending champions England will meet Ireland tomorrow in the title decider at the Senior Women’s Home Internationals at Newport, Wales.Both teams have a 100% record of two wins from two matches so far, with England defeating Scotland 5.5-2.5 today, having previously beaten Wales 5-3.England captain Debbie Richards commented: “It will be a big day tomorrow for both teams as the winner will lift the trophy.”England are aiming for their fourth consecutive win and their 11th overall victory in this championship.Today, the team made a great start to the match, winning all three singles. “We had a fantastic start this morning,” said Richards. “Jackie Foster and Felicity Christie started the winning streak with a 6/5 victory, closely followed by Lulu Houseman and Caroline Berry winning by the same margin. Aileen Greenfield and Julie Brown battled away after a slow start to win 3/2.”In the afternoon singles the matches were very tight and after nine holes could have gone either way. But England fought hard in the windy and cold conditions to eventually secure a comfortable win.In the other match Ireland beat Wales 6-2, having previously beaten Scotland by the same margin.Click here for full scoresCaption. England team. Back row from left: Caroline Berry, Felicity Christine, Julie Brown, Aileen Greenfield. Front row, from left: Jackie Foster, Debbie Richards, Fiona Edmond, Lulu Housman . (Image copyright The R&A ) England’s reign as Senior Women’s Home Internationals champions was halted by Ireland in a hard-fought battle at Newport, Wales.England start title defence with win over WalesEngland made a confident start to the defence of the Senior Women’s Home Internationals, beating the hosts, Wales, 5-3 at Newport.England are aiming for their 11th overall win in this event and their fourth consecutive championship title.The team laid the foundations of today’s success in the morning foursomes. Aileen Greenfield and Julie Brown powered to a 6/4 win over their opponents, while Jackie Foster and Fiona Edmond – respectively the English senior stroke play and amateur champions – won 3/2.In the singles Brown was again in a hurry, winning 7/5. Comfortable wins from Greenfield (4/3) and Foster (3/2) secured the match win for the European silver medallists.In the day’s other match, Ireland beat Scotland 6-2. Tomorrow England play Scotland and Wales play Ireland.The team, captained by Debbie Richards of Burhill, Surrey, is: Caroline Berry of Bromborough, Cheshire, Julie Brown of Trentham, Staffordshire, Felicity Christine of Woking, Surrey, Fiona Edmond of Ipswich, Suffolk, Jackie Foster of Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire, Aileen Greenfield of Pyecombe, Sussex and Lulu Housman of Wyke Green, Middlesex.Click here for full scores Tags: Senior Women’s Home Internationalslast_img read more

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3 Aug
2020

Minor Baseball Season in full swing

first_imgThe minor baseball season is in full swing throughout the West Kootenay, and in the Heritage City, the Nelson Jays are out to defend West Kootenay Babe Ruth Baseball Championship won in 2015.The Jays met Castlegar this past week at Queen Elizabeth Park. Both teams battle the opposition, and the weather, during this mid-week contest with the host team coming out on top.The NDBA has fields teams in six divisions — Tee-Ball, Rookie, Minor, Major, Junior and Senior Babe Ruth.The teams play at Queen Elizabeth Lions Park.Nelson plays in the West Kootenay Minor Baseball leaqgue, which  runs until the middle of June when playoffs close out the house league campaigns.The West Kootenay teams — Grand Forks, Fruitvale, Castlegar, Trail and Nelson — then form all-star squads to participate in provincial play.last_img read more

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3 Aug
2020

Countdown is on for MS Bike Challengers — still time to register

first_img“The difficulty and length, combined with the epic scenery of the West Kootenays really sets this event apart from other MS Bike rides,” said Jillian Earl, event coordinator. “It’s not hard to see why many would travel to participate.”Riders are supported throughout the weekend with several rest stops and support vehicles along the route. A dinner is also hosted on Saturday evening, celebrating their hard work.Earl is still encouraging those interested in riding to register. She is hoping to have 25 more join by the event weekend.“The countdown is on, but there’s still time to register,” said Earl.Those interested in riding in the MS Bike – West Kootenay Challenge can learn more, and register at www.westkootenayglacierchallenge.ca. In less than two weeks, participants of the MS Bike West Kootenay Challenge will take on 222km of road (and hills) around the Kokanee Glacier, and all for a good cause.Over August 19th and 20th, cyclists will travel from New Denver to Nelson, and back to Nelson via Kaslo raising funds to support the MS Society of Canada. So far, participants have raised over $40,000 towards the event’s goal of $115,000. These funds will support the programs and services offered by the MS Society, as well as research into treatments and a cure for the disease that affects approximately 100,000 Canadians.Of this year’s 75 registered participants, nearly half are taking on the ride for the first time. Many are from the West Kootenays, but some will travel from other parts of the province, and one participant will come as far as Manitoba.last_img read more

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2 Aug
2020

GO WEST MARIE STRETCHES OUT TO TAKE $125,000 FRAN’S VALENTINE STAKES BY 1 ¼ LENGTHS UNDER STEVENS; TRUMAN TRAINEE GETS MILE ON TURF IN 1:38.81

first_imgFILLY BY WESTERN FAME TAKES GOLDEN STATE SERIES RACE FOR CALIFORNIA-BRED OR SIRED OLDER FILLIES & MARES ARCADIA, Calif. (May 23, 2015)–Favored Go West Marie stretched out off of three consecutive sprints to win Saturday’s $125,000 Fran’s Valentine Stakes by 1 ¼ lengths, while covering one mile on turf under Gary Stevens in 1:38.81. Trained by Eddie Truman and owned by Peter Redekop BC, Ltd., the 4-year-old filly by Western Fame appeared on the muscle early but settled into a stalking trip en route to notching her fourth stakes win and seventh win from 20 starts. (The Fran’s Valentine, run as Santa Anita’s sixth race, was the second in a series of five Golden State Series stakes for horses bred or sired in California).“The key with her is to get relaxed,” said Stevens. “When Rafael (Bejarano, aboard eventual sixth place finisher Wild in the Saddle) was getting out pretty good going into the first turn, it gave me a little bump to get out and she got a little aggressive. Once I got her back midway around the turn, she switched off for me and she has an explosive kick. She outclassed these fillies today.”The 3-5 favorite in a field of eight older fillies and mares, Go West Marie paid $3.40, $2.60 and $2.40. The win improved her overall mark to 20-7-2-5, and with the winner’s share of $75,000, she ran her earnings to $557,520.“Gary loved her at a mile,” said Truman, who is enjoying perhaps his best year as a conditioner. “We both think she’s actually better going a mile. Today it scared me with that slow pace, and he rode her like the champion rider that he is. He said ‘Hey, we’re not saving ground. We’re the best horse and here we come.”Ridden by Santiago Gonzalez, Chati’s On Top rallied from last to finish second, one length in front of longshot My Monet. Dispatched at 7-1, Chati’s On Top paid $5.20 and $3.40.Ridden by Gonzalo Nicolas, My Monet set the pace to the furlong pole and tired to finish third, three quarters of a length in front of Mangita. Off at 16-1, My Monet paid $6.60 to show.Fractions on the race were 24.33, 49.68, 1:14.47 and 1:26.78. –last_img read more

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