4 Jun
2021

Fake 50 euro notes in circulation

first_imgTwitter Print Advertisement Linkedin WhatsApp THE NUMBER of fake 50 euro notes circulating in Limerick was up this week, with seven incidents reported to Gardai.The duds were given in exchange for goods in various outlets across Limerick, mainly grocery stores, petrol stations, a pharmacy and a juice bar. In some of the instances the fraudsters managed to con staff, but in other cases, the forgeries were spotted and the notes were not accepted. On a couple of occasions staff held on to the fakes until gardai arrived.One of the culprits involved in trying to use these dud notes is described as a young red haired male of approximately 19 years and reported to have been wearing a navy tracksuit and runners at the time at the time of the attempted fraud.Gardai remind people to make sure and carry out essential security checks on euro notes. Obvious security features should be identified before accepting notes, these include; checking for the watermark, security thread, hologram patch and raised print. The value numeral on the 50 euro note will also change colour from purple to olive green or brown when tilted if the note is a genuine.By taking a few seconds to feel, examine and tilt euro notes, fraudsters can be prevented from passing off their fakes as the real thing.center_img Previous articleCollins family to march in honour of Roy’s deathNext articleLease Market’s Field for soccer, cllr pleads admin Email Facebook NewsLocal NewsFake 50 euro notes in circulationBy admin – May 7, 2009 2497 last_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

Details of free summer camps at LIT and MIC revealed

first_imgLinkedin Mary Immaculate College (MIC) and Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) have announced details of their FREE ‘EMPOWER’ Summer Camps, which will take place this July and will be open to second-level students in transition year, fifth year and sixth year.The 5 day ‘EMPOWER’ Summer Camp programme in entrepreneurship, creativity, design skills and innovation, is funded by the HEA and is being run collaboratively between MIC and LIT in both their Limerick and Tipperary Campuses :  Limerick: 10th to 14th July and Tipperary: 17th to 21st JulyThe programme has been designed with the aim of developing skills in young people to embrace innovation, enhance and develop creativity, problem solving and critical thinking skills, through a variety of hands-on collaborative scientific thinking and entrepreneurial thinking activities, and projects. There will also be a focus on developing effective leadership and communication skills and providing the students with the opportunity to meet and network with a variety of inspirational leaders and innovators during the 5 days.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up According to Dr Maeve Liston, Director of Enterprise and Community Engagement, MIC, “The camps will also further compliment the principles of the Junior and Senior Cycles in our second level education system through high quality hands-on interactive informal learning experiences, promoting innovation, communication, personal effectiveness, critical and creative thinking, and working with others all of which are prioritised in the Framework for Junior and Senior Cycle Education.”Gillian Barry, Head of Innovation & Enterprise at LIT stated that, “This is very much a collaborative effort in enhancing the skills needs in the region where LIT and MIC are working with Entrepreneurs and academics together with organisations like Junior Achievement Ireland, Foroige, Coder Dojo, Local Enterprise Offices, and a wide variety of community groups, organisations, schools, business’ and industry. We have collaborated specifically with entrepreneurs and experts in the fields of enterprise & innovation, education, youth development, community development, creativity and leadership on the design and delivery of what is ensured to be a high quality educational programme.” She added that the programme is designed to have a high impact it will be an immersive, social and fun experience for the week with opportunities to create skills and friendships for life. Facebook MIC Lecturer Elected to Board of International Society for Music Education Limerick Post Show | FOLM Project MIC Student Experience Virtual Sessions RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsEducationDetails of free summer camps at LIT and MIC revealedBy Editor – June 10, 2017 1809 Twitter Email Print TAGSEMPOWER summer campsLITMIC International Women’s Day LIT Interested parties can register via Eventbrite.https://www.eventbrite.com/e/empower-summer-limerick-region-tickets-34948387568Places are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.For further info contact: [email protected] and/or [email protected] Advertisement New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland WhatsApp MIC Teams Up with GPA on New Scholarship Scheme for Postgraduate Students Previous articleLimerick baritone for Lyric Opera WeimarNext articleLimerick Social Democrats condemn mosque attacks Editor last_img read more

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17 Jan
2021

Drought & Lawns

first_imgLast year’s prolonged drought has extended into this year. Lawns that were in poor health before the drought are having trouble greening up now. If you’re reviving a spotty lawn, perk it up with help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.   Water correctly. In the absence of rainfall, established lawns need about 1 inch of water a week. Because the soil cannot absorb that much water at one time, which results in runoff, smaller volumes of water totaling 1 inch may need to be applied at separate times during the week. For example, two half-inch applications could be made three to four days apart.Many homeowners use irrigation systems to water their lawns, and they tend to water lightly and frequently. This can result in poorly rooted turfgrass. Watering deeply and infrequently is ideal. (Remember to follow your county’s outdoor watering schedule.)Don’t guess, soil test! The proper application of fertilizer is critical to lawn health. A soil test is the best way to determine your lawn’s specific fertilizer needs. For a small fee, your local UGA Extension office can help you submit your soil to the Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratories in Athens, Georgia, for testing. The results will provide you with your soil’s pH, suggestions for adjustments of that pH, and specific recommendations for the amount and timing of fertilizer application. Applying too much or too little fertilizer is a costly mistake that many homeowners make. Local waterways are often affected when excessive fertilizer runs off into stormwater drains and creeks. Aerate during the growing season. Aerification of your lawn with a core aerator increases water penetration, reduces soil compaction and encourages healthy root growth. Aeration works best if completed during the active growing season, which is now for warm-season lawns. Grow turfgrass in areas with the right light conditions. Grass doesn’t grow in the forest because trees outcompete the grass for light, water and nutrients. Turfgrasses perform better in full sun. Varieties that will tolerate some minimal shade include fescue, St. Augustinegrass and some varieties of zoysiagrass, including ‘Zeon’ and ‘JaMur.’ Consider adding a shade garden in truly shady areas where it is difficult to establish turfgrass. This will save you some frustration!Mow your lawn to the right height and at the right frequency. Mowing the lawn does more than remove excess growth — it encourages the health of the turfgrass. Mowing turfgrass too short removes excess shoot tissue that is needed to make food for the plant, thus damaging your lawn. A good rule of thumb is to mow the lawn often enough so that you don’t remove more than one-third of the leaf blade.Hybrid bermudagrass should be mowed to a height of 1 to 1.5 inches every three to four days. Centipedegrass should be mowed to 1 to 2 inches every five to 10 days. Common bermudagrass should be mowed to 1 to 2 inches every five to seven days. Tall fescue should be mowed to a height of 2 to 3 inches every five to seven days. Zoysiagrass should be mowed to 1 to 2 inches every three to seven days.Let the clips fall where they may. Do not remove grass clippings from the lawn as they return nutrients and organic matter back to the soil. Leaving grass clippings on the lawn can reduce fertilizer needs by as much as 30 percent. However, clumps of grass should be scattered since they keep sunlight from reaching the underlying grass. Use a rake or leaf blower to scatter the clumps.For more information on caring for turfgrass lawns in Georgia, visit www.GeorgiaTurf.com.last_img read more

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3 Jan
2020

Birmingham 1-1 Middlesbrough: Bamford strike sends ten-man Boro top

first_img Middlesbrough striker Patrick Bamford celebrates his leveller against Birmingham 1 On-loan striker Patrick Bamford fired ten-man Middlesbrough to the top of the Championship table as they battled back to earn a 1-1 draw at Birmingham.Boro had been staring down the barrel of defeat after Paul Caddis put Blues ahead from the spot in first-half stoppage time, the visitors finding themselves a man down with goalkeeper Dimitri Konstantopoulos sent off for conceding the penalty.But a storming second-half fightback earned its reward when Chelsea forward Bamford struck for the 12th time this season in the 74th minute.The draw may have ended Middlesbrough’s run of six successive Championship wins, but a point was the least they deserved for their battling second-half display.Bamford’s equaliser denied Birmingham what would have been a morale-boosting win little more than 24 hours after their parent company, Birmingham International Holdings Limited, went into receivership.Their winless league run has now stretched to six games – collecting just five points from 18 – as they wait to discover if there will be any fall-out from the Football League following the events in Hong Kong surrounding BIHL.Middlesbrough’s neat passing style saw them dominate the early exchanges, and it needed a fingertip save by Birmingham goalkeeper Darren Randolph to nudge away a low angled drive from Emilio Nsue after three minutes following a slick pass from Adam Forshaw.But that was something of a false dawn for Middlesbrough as it was Birmingham who went on to carry the greater threat in the opening period.Andrew Shinnie, Clayton Donaldson and Demarai Gray all went close for the hosts and they eventually got the breakthrough through Caddis’ penalty, awarded after Konstantopoulos brought down Donaldson with a crude challenge in the box.After the break, however, it was a different story, as a revitalised Boro sensed the chance to force their way back into the game despite their lack of manpower.Grant Leadbitter had impressed all game for the visitors and it was fitting that it was his pass which teed up Bamford to beat Randolph from six yards.Donaldson then had a chance to grab a dramatic stoppage-time winner from a Caddis cross, but headed over the bar from six yards to ensure that the spoils were shared.last_img read more

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