2 Mar
2021

Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Releases Soundboard From Colorado’s 1st Bank Center

first_img[Photo: Andrew Rios]Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | 1st Bank Center | Broomfield, CO | 4/29/2017Set One (8:39PM – 10:17PM): Shelter From The Storm @ (TH) -> Bertha > Let It Grow -> No Quarter Jam # -> Help On The Way > Slipknot! $ > Throwing Stones, Must Have Been Roses, Gonesville % (SM) -> Shakedown Street ^Set Two (10:45PM – 12:53AM)&&: Morfbeats & -> Space *-> Dark Star + -> Half Step -> Estimated Prophet -> Terrapin Suite > The Other One > Eyes Of The World @@Encore One: One More Saturday Night -> Cold Rain & Snow Jam ## -> One More Saturday Night Reprise ##, Not Fade Away $$ -> Tequila Jam -> Not Fade Away RepriseEncore Two: Ripple, Born To Run %%Notes:@ – Bob Dylan Cover, First Time Played by Almost Dead# – Not played by Almost Dead since The Belly Up, Aspen, CO, 2016-07-02, a gap of 32 shows$ – With a “Duo Jam”% – Bob Weir cover, from “Blue Mountain”, First Time Played by Almost Dead^ – With short China Cat & Cold Rain & Snow Jams (Band)& – Kind of a Drums -> Space Hybrid, with Joe, Adam Morford, Billy Martin & John Medeski, playing crazy percussion instruments created & built by Adam Morford on a riser behind Joe’s kit. Eventually Marco, Tommy, Dave & Scott joined in & the segment evolved into Space. First Time Played by Almost Dead.&& – Entire second set from Space on & encore with Stuart Bogie on Sax, flute & clarinet.* – With John Medeski on percussion & then Hammond Organ and Billy Martin & Adam Morford on Percussion+ – With John Medeski on Hammond Organ and Billy Martin & Adam Morford on [email protected]@ – With a tease of what I think was a Tears for Fears tune (TH)## – First Time Played by Almost Dead$$ – With Black Throated Wind teases (SM), Chuckles (WOLF) Teases (SM) and a “Duo Jam”%% – Played with the house lights on Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s Taper Tuesday is upon us yet again. For the 39th installment of the series, the group has just released the soundboards from the Grateful Dead ensemble’s arena debut at the 1st Bank Center in Broomfield, Colorado, back at the end of April. While originally scheduled for Almost Dead’s Red Rocks debut, following dangerous weather conditions, the group had to suddenly change their plans, leading to their performance at the 1st Bank.Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Details Rescheduled Red Rocks ShowSupported by Medeski, Martin, & Wood, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead still had some special surprises planned for the night, including a massive collaborative “Drums/Space” > “Dark Star” to open the second set, which saw John Medeski, Billy Martin, Adam Morford (Morfbeats), and Stuart Bogie join the group ahead of a tight second set housing a massive “Terrapin Suite.” The night also saw the group debut covers of Bob Dylan’s “Shelter From The Storm” and Bob Weir’s “Gonesville” during their first set, and during a surprise second encore, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead closed out their show with the house lights up while debuting Bruce Springsteen’s “Born To Run” (following Joe Russo’s announcement, “Now, for something completely different”). You can check out the official soundboard from Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s 1st Bank performance below, as well as Live For Live Music’s full recap of the night.Now For Something Completely Different: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s Spectacular Arena Debut last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

Linking China’s climate policy to its growth

first_imgOver the next three decades China’s growth will be such that if its leaders don’t act on climate change, it might not matter what the rest of the world does, Nobel Prize-winning economist Michael Spence said in a Harvard talk Tuesday.Spence, a New York University professor who served as dean of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences from 1984 to 1990, pointed to several environmental and energy factors to consider alongside China’s rapid development.Population growth is controlled, and per-capita income is expected to continue to rise, which usually coincides with a decrease in the energy intensity of an economy. Further, there is great opportunity to engage in sustainable construction in China because so much — buildings, electric grids, even cities — is still in the planning stages.The pressing question is whether China will take advantage of opportunities to shift from high-carbon fuels, such as coal, and curb the clouds of pollution billowing from the tailpipes of its burgeoning fleet of cars.“I think the issue comes down to carbon intensity, and there the story is much less clear,” Spence said. “I am not aware of anything that looks like a comprehensive plan that takes carbon intensity down beyond the effect of, let’s call it, a fairly successful and aggressive program of energy efficiency.”Spence spoke at the Science Center before a crowd of several hundred. The lecture, sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment and the Harvard China Project, was first in a series on energy, climate, and development in China over the next 20 years.Spence went deep into the dynamics of economic development in low- and middle-income nations. Most of today’s high-tech, high-wage economies are in Europe or are European offshoots, such as the United States, Canada, and Australia. Just a handful of other nations, such as Japan and South Korea, have been able to develop quickly and avoid what is called the “middle-income trap,” in which rapid initial growth gives way to stagnation at a level below the standards of Western industrialized nations, with per-capita incomes between $3,000 and $10,000 a year.The middle-income trap, or, as Spence calls it, “middle-income transition,” develops when a nation’s rapid growth gradually cools amid rising incomes, eroding its relative advantage for low-cost manufacturing.The common trait among countries that have managed to push through the trap, Spence said, is a high level of economic investment, which allows manufacturing to shift to high-value, high-wage products. An important part of that shift is ramping up domestic demand for goods and services. Early in a country’s development, growth can be fueled largely by exports, but as incomes and manufacturing costs rise, domestic demand has to come along, helping support the economy as its global advantage declines.China will be the next country to see its way through, Spence believes. The government has an enormous balance sheet of assets to cushion the shocks along the way, and seems to have the savvy to employ market-based solutions when they would work best and more traditional command-and-control solutions when not, he said. It also has room to be more decisive than Western democracies, where political will is often the principal factor holding back reforms. High pollution levels, already a major concern, might lead to substantive action. The design of new cities, for example, could incorporate features that reduce the need for automobiles.However, Spence said he hasn’t yet seen a coherent strategy, so it remains to be seen whether China will successfully address pollution and climate change.“My best guess is that they’ll go after it much more aggressively because of the environmental contamination of air quality, water quality, the things that … really matter to people,” he said.last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

Visual forensics that can detect fake text

first_imgIn a time of deepfakes and AI equipped with far-too-human natural-language, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and IBM Research asked: How can we help people detect AI-generated text?That question led Sebastian Gehrmann, a Ph.D. candidate at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Hendrik Strobelt, a researcher at IBM, to develop a statistical method, along with an open-access interactive tool, to differentiate language generated by code from human speech.Natural-language generators are trained on tens of millions of online texts and mimic human language by predicting the words that most often follow one another. For example, the words “have,” “am,” and “was” are statically most likely to come after the word “I”.Using that idea, Gehrmann and Strobelt developed a method that, instead of flagging errors in text, identifies text that is too predictable.“The idea we had is that as models get better and better, they go from definitely worse than humans, which is detectable, to as good as or better than humans, which may be hard to detect with conventional approaches,” said Gehrmann.“Before, you could tell by all the mistakes that text was machine-generated,” said Strobelt. “Now, it’s no longer the mistakes but rather the use of highly probable (and somewhat boring) words that call out machine-generated text. With this tool, humans and AI can work together to detect fake text.” “This research is targeted at giving humans more information so that they can make an informed decision about what’s real and what’s fake.” — Sebastian Gehrmann Gehrmann and Strobelt will present their research, which was co-authored by Alexander Rush, an associate in computer science at SEAS, at the Association for Computational Linguistics conference Sunday through Thursday.Gehrmann and Strobelt’s method, known as GLTR, is based on a model trained on 45 million texts from websites — the public version of the OpenAI model, GPT-2. Because it uses GPT-2 to detect generated text, GLTR works best against GPT-2, but it does well against other models, too.Here’s how it works:Users enter a passage of text into the tool, which highlights each word in green, yellow, red, or purple, each color signifying the predictability of the word in the context of what it follows. Green means the word was very predictable; yellow, moderately predicable; red not very predictable; and purple means the model wouldn’t have predicted the word at all.So, a paragraph of text generated by GPT-2 will look like this:To compare, this is a real New York Times article:And this is an excerpt from arguably the most unpredictable text ever written by a human, James Joyce’s “Finnegans Wake”:The method isn’t meant to replace humans in identifying fake texts, but to support human intuition and understanding. The researchers tested the model with a group of undergraduates in an SEAS computer science class. Without the model, the students could identify about 50 percent of AI-generated text. With the color overlay, they identified 72 percent.Gehrmann and Strobelt say that with a little training and experience with the program, the percentage could get even better.“Our goal is to create human and AI collaboration systems,” said Gehrmann. “This research is targeted at giving humans more information so that they can make an informed decision about what’s real and what’s fake.” Related The ruse of ‘fake news’ Researchers propose a new field of study to explore how intelligent machines behave as independent agents Researchers want to use science to combat techniques that can make the true seem false, and the reverse The science of the artificiallast_img read more

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8 Dec
2020

BC Health Department: Positive coronavirus case in person who visited Old Union Hotel

first_imgLocated at 246 Clinton St. in Binghamton, the Old Union Hotel said the person was at the establishment on Monday, September 21 between 4:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. The BC Health Department asks anyone who was at the establishment during this period to quarantine until October 6th. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Broome County Health Department issued a public health statement regarding a positive COVID case in a person who was at the Old Union Hotel. last_img

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29 Sep
2020

Asset management costs at Dutch schemes on the rise

first_imgAsset management costs at the largest Dutch pension funds have risen for the first time since 2014, according to LCP Netherlands.The consultancy, which looked at the annual reports of 10 large schemes with combined assets of €846bn at 2017-end, said that asset management costs had increased by 2 basis points to 0.52% on average last year relative to 2016.In currency terms, costs rose by €485m to €4,268m.LCP said the pension funds attributed the increase to a re-allocation to more expensive asset classes, such as infrastructure and residential mortages, and higher performances fees for asset managers. Transaction costs, which had also remained stable since 2014, rose last year from 0.08% to 0.11% of invested assets, with pension funds citing an increased insight into costs, according to the pensions adviser.It found that, in contrast, administration costs per participant had dropped by nearly 7%, from €89 to €83 on average. LCP said the decrease was in part due to cost reductions agreed between the pension funds and their respective providers.LCP said that it could not establish whether higher asset management costs had led to higher returns or the other way round.Comparing returns and costs for the period 2012-2016 with 2012-2017, it found that returns had dropped while, at six schemes, investment costs had increased.At four pension funds costs had dropped, but proportionally less than returns had decreased, said the consultancy. It declined to link the schemes to their returns and cost data.LCP looked into the annual reports of the civil service scheme ABP, healthcare pension fund PFZW, the metal schemes PMT and PME, road transport pension fund Vervoer, multi-sector scheme PGB and railways pension fund SPF.It also examined the company schemes of telecoms firm KPN, electronics giant Philips and Rabobank.last_img read more

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27 Sep
2020

Portugal decriminalised drugs resulting in teen use doubling in a decade

first_imgDaily Mail 31 October 2014Family First Comment: Drug proponents like the Drug Foundation promote Portugal as the model for decriminalisation of dope. Here’s what they DON’T tell you! The nation held up by the Liberal Democrats yesterday as a shining example of how to win the war on drugs is far from the unqualified success story they make out.For the number of children using drugs in Portugal has more than doubled since the country’s laws were liberalised, the latest figures show. A decade after the law was relaxed, nearly a fifth of 15 and 16-year-olds use drugs – well over twice the number in the years before decriminalisation.The controversial Home Office report commissioned by the Liberal Democrats states: ‘It is clear that there has not been a lasting and significant increase in drug use in Portugal since 2001.’ But the evidence suggests otherwise.The most recent independent report on what is happening in Portugal shows that in 1995 eight per cent of Portuguese teenagers had tried drugs.In 1999, when laws began to be relaxed, it was 12 per cent.But after decriminalisation in 2001, it rose to 18 per cent in 2003 and 19 per cent in 2011. The picture for cannabis use is similar. In 1995, only 7 per cent of Portuguese teens had tried the drug but by 2011 the figure was 16 per cent.READ MORE: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2815084/Portugal-decriminalised-drugs-Results-Use-teens-doubled-decade-nearly-fifth-15-16-year-olds-using-drugs.htmllast_img read more

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