15 Jun
2021

Trump is lying about jobs program

first_imgUnited Steelworkers Union Local 1999 protests outside the Carrier plant in Indianapolis, March 23.A major source of Trump’s appeal was his promise to return “good jobs” back to the United States.During Trump’s spring campaigning, a secretly recorded video received widespread attention on the internet. It showed Carrier Air Conditioner bosses announcing to workers that the Indiana plant was being moved to Mexico and the workers were losing their jobs.Trump made news of this move a poster child of his campaign. He brought it up time and time again, saying he would call up the company and threaten them with a 35 percent tariff on any air conditioners they imported from Mexico.But that threat to impose a tariff on Carrier is unconstitutional and impossible to enforce.The company didn’t back down. It announced on Nov. 11 that it was moving 1,400 jobs from the Indiana plant to Monterrey, Mexico, by 2019. Carrier’s empty words addressing the devastation to the workers were: “We are making every effort to ease the transition for our Carrier colleagues in Indiana.” (nytimes.com, Nov. 11)The company obviously didn’t want the bad publicity that Trump poured on their heads. But a Mexican worker must work a whole shift to make what a unionized worker in Indiana makes in an hour. Since Carrier’s Indiana plant is profitable, cutting labor costs by this much will mean a big increase in profits. (Indianapolis Business Journal, Feb. 10)And boosting profits is what capitalism is all about.But there was another consequence of this attack on workers. United Steelworkers Union Local 1999, representing the Carrier workers, did not endorse reactionary Trump during the primary elections.Instead, the union backed Bernie Sanders, the only mainstream candidate claiming to be a socialist.Attacks on workers may get capitalists greater profits — but can also start workers on the road to revolutionFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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12 Jun
2021

Mumia still on death row, but executions of journalists on the wane

first_imgNews Organisation RSF_en October 7, 2011 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Mumia still on death row, but executions of journalists on the wanecenter_img Help by sharing this information On the eve of the 9th World Day Against the Death Penalty, Reporters Without Borders and the Paris-based NGO Together Against the Death Penalty (ECPM) would like to point out that being a journalist, editing a website or keeping a blog can still expose a person to the possibility of the death penalty in some countries.The charges of “subversion,” “endangering state security” and even “apostasy” can be used in some countries to convict and execute someone who has criticized the government, made fun of a leader in a cartoon or just covered a highly sensitive subject. Around 10 people, mostly bloggers and netizens, are awaiting execution or are facing the possibility of a death sentence in Iran and Vietnam. What will become of Vahid Asghari, 25, who has been jailed since 2008 in Tehran and who was sentenced to death on a date that was never made public?As well as a negation of justice, capital punishment is also a deadly threat that encourages self-censorship. China, which leads the world in executions, has no fewer than 55 capital offences of which three are direct threats to freedom of expression: “endangering public security,” “instigating the country’s division” and “divulging state secrets.”In Uganda, the imprisoned journalists Augustine Okello and Patrick Otim are still waiting to know whether the charges of subversion and treason that have been brought against them will cost them their lives. Abdelrahman Adam, a Sudanese radio journalist who has been held since October 2010 on a charge of violating state secrets, is in the same situation.Nonetheless, the number of journalists being sentenced to death is declining. Even in Iran, which ranks second in the world in the number of executions, death sentences are being commuted or quashed. Capital punishment neither deters crimes nor compensates for the damage caused. Still less can it destroy the inalienable right to inform, question and speak out.Of the few journalists actually under sentence of death, the one who has been in the situation longest has become a symbol of the campaign for abolition. He is not an Iranian, Vietnamese or Sudanese. He is a citizen of the United States. Sentenced to die for the murder of a policeman at the end of a trial marked by irregularities and racism, Mumia Abu-Jamal will soon complete his 30th year on death row.Would he have suffered the same fate if he had not been what he called the “Voice of the Voiceless,” a voice that still makes itself heard from his cell ? Would he still today be the victim of judicial persecution by a Pennsylvania district attorney, who is trying to block a new sentencing hearing?Thirty years on death row is a long time. But 30 years since France abolished the death penalty and scrapped the guillotine is not. The coincidence reinforces the symbolism. All the more reason to insist that, after Troy Davis’ execution, Mumia Abu-Jamal is not subjected to judicial murder too. last_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

Gardaí criticised over investigation of teenager’s death

first_imgNo vaccines in Limerick yet by Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected] family of a 16-year-old girl who was found submerged at the canal entrance to the Abbey river have accused Gardaí of not fully investigating the circumstances leading up to her deathCity coroner John McNamara had to call order to proceedings on a number of occasions when family members disrupted the inquest with questions and comments directed at gardai.The 16 year old girl, who was described as “level headed” and in good form, was last seen by her sister shortly after 11pm on the night before her body was discovered in the water by a passerby.Garda John O’Connell told the inquest there was no evidence that a minor assault on the girl earlier that night was linked to her death.At this point, the girl’s sister and brother asked why no other depositions were given as they were key to the circumstances on the night and could answer questions the family had about the girl’s death.The teenager was seen running from the High Street area of the city towards Denmark Street after her sister attempted to get her into a car to take her home.The family claimed that she was in the company of others when she ran from her sister.There were heated exchanges as family members told gardaí to tell the truth, claiming that they should have “further investigated” the circumstances and that there was a more sinister background to the girl’s death.Medical evidence indicated toxic levels of alcohol along therapeutic levels of diazepam and alprazolam. According to the pathology report, death was due to drowning.The coroner said that while he accepted that the girl did not have suicidal thoughts and there was no evidence of foul play, an open verdict would be the most appropriate one.One of the girl’s sisters responded: “Ye just want to open and shut this case so that it goes away – the questions will never go away for us”.Her mother said that “kids go to the canal for a drink, we all know that – they don’t go there to jump in the river. She was a happy girl and had the world in front of her. She didn’t know what she was doing but my daughter didn’t jump, I believe she was pushed.”Asked by Mr McNamara if there were any other lines of inquiry both Inspector Seamus Ruane and Garda John O’Connell said that the investigation had concluded and there was no other evidence.“Nobody saw her fall in. Nobody saw her jump in or nobody saw her being pushed so this inquest must return an open verdict”, the coroner said. Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL First Irish death from Coronavirus Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email TAGSfeaturedfull-image WhatsAppcenter_img Advertisement Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Linkedin NewsGardaí criticised over investigation of teenager’s deathBy Staff Reporter – November 14, 2013 616 Print Previous articleLimerick is ready to shuffle to Bombay Bicycle ClubNext articleMinister opens Red Door Business incubation centre Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Facebooklast_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Congressman promotes pro-life perspective

first_imgRep. Mike McIntyre, D-N.C.,  gave a lecture entitled “A Reflection on the Importance of Faith and Prayer in Shaping National Policies” in Mendoza on Friday as part of ND Right to Life’s Pro-Life Respect Week.McIntyre, a pro-life Democrat and member of the bipartisan congressional pro-life caucus, spoke about his faith’s role in inspiring him to pursue issues in politics, specifically the decision between life and choice regarding abortion.“I know that during the 18 years I’ve spent in Congress, I’ve always thought it was important to honor and respect the opportunities the good Lord gives us,” he said. “When I, in Congress, try to make sure that we’re doing the right thing with regard to pro-life issues, it’s something which we take very seriously as part as our faith and as well as part of our concern and our constitutional responsibility.”McIntyre said he believes the influence of faith can help bring people together to solidarity on these divisive and controversial issues.“When we talk about a variety of backgrounds, the question is how important is your faith to affect what you do,” he said. “We want to make sure that as long you’re on a Catholic campus or a Protestant campus or a private campus or a public campus … do we have to know there is a void between our faith and the public marketplace of ideas, and the answer to that is compellingly, profoundly absolutely not. There should be no void and in fact that’s the challenge.”McIntyre’s said his inspiration to pursue political science came from personally watching John Dean testify against Richard Nixon — for what would later be known as the Watergate scandal — in a hearing chaired by his senior senator, Sam Ervin. McIntyre said that event and expressing ‘faith in the little things’ helped him see the services he could provide as someone in public service and bring integrity in the much-maligned field of political science.“I didn’t know any friends at all that were going into political science,” he said. “They said, ‘It is so dirty and so corrupt why would you want to be involved in that?’ But for me it was the opposite effect because those of us with the right motives and ideas don’t get involved …“I have plenty of doctors, bankers, realtors, teachers, even carpenters, plumbers and asphalt layers who come see us in Washington because they know the government will affect their jobs and what they studied to do. … When we think about being faithful to little things and what God calls on us to do, the question is are we willing to lay our faith and apply it to whatever services we have? My situation, I had the opportunity to go up to [the University of North] Carolina and decide to major in political science thinking one day I’ll get to go back [to Capitol Hill].”From his historical inspiration to his political career that came 22 years later, McIntyre said being alert and willing to act on God’s calling helped him see the success he enjoys today.“Pray, prepare, pursue,” he said. “We talked about how prayer ought to be the first resort and not the last resort. I challenge you to do that. Someone challenged me to keep a prayer journal. I don’t know if any of you do that, but write down your prayer request and then reflect on how God answers them.”Tags: Notre Dame Right to Life, Right to Lifelast_img read more

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