4 Jun
2021

Wood burning stoves put thatched homes at risk

first_img TAGSfireLimerick City and County CouncilTom Cassidytraditional thatched cottages Call to extend Patrickswell public sewer line Advertisement WhatsApp Facebook New parklet changes Catherine Street dining experience Email Previous articleComptroller and Auditor General’s office to report on UL auditNext articleWin cinema tickets Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. NewsLocal NewsWood burning stoves put thatched homes at riskBy Bernie English – February 24, 2018 2266 Printcenter_img Linkedin Limerick’s O’Connell Street Revitalisation Works to go ahead Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Thatched cottage The owners of traditional thatched cottages who install wood-burning stoves are running a serious risk of having a house fire.That was the message from the Conservation Officer of Limerick City and County Council this week, when he told a meeting of elected members of the council that a number of the county’s thatched cottages had been lost to fire.Conservation Officer, Tom Cassidy was addressing a request to members of the KIlmallock and Cappamore district of the council to remove a listed thatch cottage from the record of protected structures.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He told the meeting that ten buildings have been lost lost to fires from the protected structures record in Limerick in the last five years.“In many cases, the fires can be attributed to wood-burning stoves being installed. The problem is that in Ireland, we’re not very good at seasoning our wood for two years,” Mr Cassidy told the meeting.“Wood that hasn’t been properly seasoned still contains sap and this adheres to the inside of the flues and catches fire. A wind lifts the material and the thatch goes up.“This happens around two years after a wood burning stove has been installed,” he explained.Mr Cassidy said that the high heat generated by burning wood in a stove can contribute to the hazard.“People should be aware that installing a wood-burning stove in a protected structure requires planning permission. There’s a reason we require people to do these things. Installing a wood burning stove can be the death-knell of a thatched house,” he told the meeting.Asked whether it was possible to control such modifications, Mr Cassidy said his department “does not have enough staff to go around knocking on doors and asking people if they have installed a wood stove”.He told members of the area committee that there are currently more than 200 thatched cottages in county Limerick.More local news here. Ireland’s First Ever Virtual Bat Walk to take place in Limerick Limerick city centre gets a deep clean O’Donnell Welcomes Major Enhancement Works for Castletroy Neighbourhood Park last_img read more

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25 Dec
2019

Just pick up and move

first_imgBecause I don’t go to an office, I can usually avoid rush-hour traffic. But the other day was an exception. I had to meet a friend in Beverly Hills at 10 a.m. As I live about 15 miles away in the San Fernando Valley, I left my house at 8:30. I made it on time but just barely. As I sat in my car, stuck in the traffic jam from hell, I couldn’t help noticing that the traffic coming from the opposite direction was equally bad. And that’s when I had my latest brainstorm: Why don’t all these people just swap homes so they’ll live close to their jobs, and so they won’t be mucking up the freeways for those of us who have to get places? I can hear some of you now saying I’m nuts, that this is the goofiest notion you’ve ever heard. I guess you need reminding that that’s exactly what your nitwit ancestors said about airplanes and the electric light. Well, you couldn’t stop the Wright brothers, and you couldn’t stop old Tom Edison, and, by golly, you can’t stop me. There is nothing more relentless than a brilliant idea whose time has come. The great thing is that this powerhouse concept is equally applicable to all cities. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake Now I’m not suggesting that a wealthy guy living in a large house should trade with some fellow living in a shack. But I’m sure that in any city, as in Los Angeles, there are comparable neighborhoods all over the place. For instance, Beverly Hills is a very nice community, but there are homes every bit as large and attractive in Encino, just as Northridge is comparable to Culver City, and Studio City and West L.A. are virtually interchangeable. By now, I’m sure I’ve got most of you at least half-sold on the idea, except you’re thinking, Who would do all the packing and moving? There probably aren’t enough moving vans in America to do the job. Granted, in comparison, the D-Day invasion was small potatoes. Well, I’ve been saving the best for last. The clincher is that there would be no packing required, except maybe for your checkbook and toothbrush. The way I see it, rich people are pretty much alike, as are middle-class people, as are the poor. So all anybody would have to do is swap house keys and, where necessary, garage door remotes. You ask, what about personal items? Such as what? I reply. Oh, say, photo albums. Leave them, I say, for the new folks. For one thing, once people go to the bother of sticking pictures in an album, they hardly ever look at them again. And even when they do, after a few years, they generally find they don’t recognize half the people saying “cheese.” After 10 years, they don’t even recognize themselves. So far as I can see, that only leaves pets and children. Pets, as we all know, are pretty darn adaptable. So long as the new people feed them, they’ll be fine. As for kids, we all know they only act like brats when they’re around their own parents. Around strangers, they’re little angels because they never know if they’re going to get whacked. So while I personally regard the swapping of kids as strictly optional, sort of like your favorite Cuisinart, your baseball-card collection and your underwear, I frankly think you’d be a stoopnagel not to take advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. — Burt Prelutsky lives in North Hills.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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21 Dec
2019

Donegal school receives humanitarian award from GOAL

first_imgPupils from Creevy National School near Ballyshannon in Co. Donegal have received a very special award from Irish humanitarian response agency, GOAL, for their part in a unique programme on global issues.The bright young minds in teacher Carmel Magee’s Fourth Class completed a number of GOAL Development Education workshops, earning them a Certificate of Achievement for their ongoing commitment and dedication to the programme.One programme the students took part in was an hour and a half long drama-based workshop to help them better understand the struggles ordinary people face in some of the countries GOAL works. Not only are these children committed to making the world a better place, they have shown admirable enthusiasm towards fundraising, raising almost €600 for GOAL’s Jersey Day in 2018.GOAL Development Education Officer, Mura Tierney, who worked closely with the students in Creevy, said:“I was very impressed by the humanitarian ethos of the school and the way staff and students alike were passionate about justice and human rights. The children were very enthusiastic workshop participants and asked great questions. I admire their dedication to humanitarian work and commitment to each workshop they took part in.”She said GOAL’s Development Education programme would not work without the commitment of school teachers throughout Ireland who care and nurture young minds each day. Creevy NS Fourth Class Teacher, Carmel Magee, said the GOAL programme helped her better engage her young pupils about global issues:“Getting involved with GOAL’s Development Education programme has helped the children become more aware of the difficulties that some people endure each day. The work was presented in an enjoyable and fun way, but when completed the children had gained so much knowledge. It was great to see the impact it made on the children, and how they were coming up with ideas on ways that we could improve the world through changing our habits as well as raising money.”The students involved were thrilled with the award and had the following to say:“Doing work with GOAL made me feel concerned about other people in other countries and it made me feel like I needed to help other people more. I also realised that when I helped it made me feel brighter too.”“GOAL made me more aware of the struggles that other people live in.”“Working with GOAL this year has helped me because now I know what pain and suffering people are going through. We can help them by raising money for them and I would love to do it again.” GOAL offers free workshops to primary schools nationwide. For more information  visit https://www.goalglobal.org/schools/Donegal school receives humanitarian award from GOAL was last modified: June 11th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Creevy National Schoolgoallast_img read more

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17 Oct
2019

Quebec Liberal MP resigns a day after Trudeau announces four byelections

first_imgOTTAWA – A Quebec Liberal MP announced Monday he’s quitting politics for family reasons.Denis Lemieux, who has represented the riding of Chicoutimi-Le Fjord since 2015, said he made the decision after careful consideration.He made the announcement in a letter published on his Facebook page.The resignation came a day after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said four byelections will be held Dec. 11 — one each in Newfoundland and Labrador, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Ontario.last_img

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17 Sep
2019

Bahamian man held following police manhunt

first_img Dion Kevin Rigby and Donovan Hanna of Grand Bahama wanted for murder Haitian gov’t official under investigation commits suicide Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Favorite Things – First Female PABX Field Service Tech for Flow TCI Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNassau, Bahamas July 18, 2017 — One man is now in police custody in connection with Sunday’s fatal shooting. Following the death of the victim Monday morning, Royal Bahamas Police Force launched a nationwide manhunt. The identities of the victim and the man held have not been released. The shooting took place around 10pm on Sunday on Third Street, Coconut Grove. The victim was walking down the street when he was confronted by another male who shot him and got away on foot.#MagneticMediaNews Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedanewslast_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources

first_img © 2017 Phys.org More information: H. S. Sugiarto et al. “Social Cooperation and Disharmony in Communities Mediated through Common Pool Resource Exploitation.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.208301 Citation: Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources (2017, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-phase-transitions-rice-farmers-insight.html Study finds mutual reinforcement of phenotypic diversity and cooperation (Phys.org)—The Balinese subak is a self-organized agrarian society on the island of Bali in Indonesia, whose members must share a limited amount of water for irrigation and rice production. Some of the farmers share the water fairly, and some don’t. As in many societies, the members of the Balinese subak are segregated into different communities. , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further The researchers mapped three clusters of subaks to three phases indicated by the analytical curves: cooperation (circles); disharmony (diamonds); and defection (squares). Credit: H. S. Sugiarto et al. ©2017 American Physical Society Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Now in a new study, scientists have found that this segregation changes a society’s cooperation dynamics and may help to promote cooperation and fair resource utilization at the societal level. The results have implications for managing natural resources, which is of particular relevance for addressing environmental issues such as curbing pollution, reducing deforestation, and saving endangered species—problems that require widespread cooperation.The researchers, H. S. Sugiarto et al., from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and other institutions, have published their results in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the researchers developed a model of social cooperation in self-organized societies that lack central governance, in which individuals are free to choose whether to abide by the rules or not. Their model shows that, as a shared resource becomes more abundant, more individuals may shift from being cooperators (who follow the rules) to being defectors (who violate the rules). At some point, the resource becomes so abundant that all individuals become defectors and social cooperation vanishes.Then the researchers looked at the same scenario, but this time they allowed the society to self-segregate into smaller communities. They found that the downside of the segregation is that it increases the social disharmony throughout the society as a whole. The upside, however, is that the social disharmony within each community becomes very low. In some communities, individuals are more likely to keep cooperating with each other—using the shared resource fairly—compared to the situation without segregation. These results were very similar to what the researchers observed in the segregated society of the Balinese subak.As the researchers explained, the results can be understood in terms of phase transitions. While phase transitions are common in many areas of physics, their role in complex systems, such as human societies, is a newer area of research. In the current study, the shift from cooperators to defectors in a society without segregation as the resource becomes more abundant represents an abrupt phase transition. The researchers explain that segregation “softens” this transition by replacing it with multiple intermediate phases, which arise because some communities are full of cooperators while others are full of defectors. “The greatest significance of our work is in the revelation that stable phases of social and ecological regimes do exist in real-world systems,” coauthor Lock Yue Chew, an associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, told Phys.org. “Our work has also developed mechanistic insights that address a vital question in social science through a more fine-grained and realistic application of ideas from physics.”In the future, the researchers plan to investigate how these results can help improve cooperative behavior in the real world, in order to better manage natural resources.”Our results are relevant to applications where the induction of cooperative social behavior is the primary approach to managing the sustainable use of limited natural resources in the context of coupled human-natural systems,” Chew said. “Potential systems of interest include the forest system, fisheries system, and many others, in addition to the rice production system of Bali in our paper.”Building on these results, in an upcoming paper the researchers report on how stress from pest infestation can affect rice growth, and how it can lead to an optimality in the farmers’ payoff. This work is scheduled to appear in the June 2017 issue of PNAS.last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Pak lifts moratorium on death penalty after attack

first_imgPrime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Wednesday lifted a self-imposed moratorium on death penalty in terror related cases, a day after ruthless Taliban militants massacred at least 132 students and nine staffers at an army-run school in Peshawar.Prime Minister Sharif told an All Parties Conference here that the moratorium on death penalty has been lifted. “Yesterday’s incident is extremely tragic,” he told the political leaders. “These sacrifices will not go wasted and we all want complete elimination of terrorism from Pakistan.” Also Read – Pro-Govt supporters rally as Hong Kong’s divisions deepenAn official from the PM office in Islamabad said that the Prime Minister abolished the moratorium on death penalty in terrorism-related cases. A de facto moratorium on civilian executions has been in place in Pakistan since 2008.Sharif had decided to resume moratorium soon after his government took office in June last year but suspended the plan under international pressure.Pakistan is feared to lose a concessionary trade deal with the European Union after resuming hangings. Some 150 countries have abolished the death penalty or no longer carry out executions. Also Read – Pak Army ‘fully prepared’ to face any challenge: Army spokesmanAccording to the interior ministry estimates more than 8,000 death row prisoners are in Pakistan who have already exhausted all options and would be hanged within weeks if the government allowed the executions. Terrorism has a very broad definition under Pakistani law. About 17,000 cases of “terrorism” are pending in special courts.Justice Project Pakistan released a report saying Wednesday that those convicted of terrorism were often tortured into confessions or denied lawyers, and that recent crackdowns had not stopped militant attacks.A moratorium on the death penalty was imposed in 2008 and only one execution has taken place since then. Taliban attackers shot most students point blank in headMost of the students at the army-run school in Peshawar were shot in the head from point blank range by the ruthless Taliban suicide attackers, in one of the most gruesome attacks against children in recent years. At least 132 students and nine staffers were killed when the attackers wearing para-military Frontier Corps uniforms stormed the Army Public School on Warsak Road and started indiscriminate firing on them on Tuesday. Quoting students, Dawn reported that the attackers scaled the boundary wall from the adjacent graveyard and started firing while moving towards the classrooms and auditorium. “Most of the students have received bullets in the head,” Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa information minister Mushtaq Ahmed Ghani said, giving out chilling account of the attack.The parents, who usually wait outside the school to pick their children at the closing time, were seen crying outside hospitals.Besides the parents and relatives, the people visiting the hospitals were also seen mourning on seeing the bodies and injured students in their blood-stained school uniform. “I saw 17 bodies at the CMH (Combined Military Hospital) and all of them had received bullets in the head,” said an eyewitness. He said that some of the bodies were mutilated. Mohammad Zeeshan, a student of grade-7, said that he and many others were getting first aid training in the school hall when they heard the gunfire. “Our trainer told us to lie down on the floor,” he said, adding that in the meantime the terrorists entered the hall. Zeeshan said the terrorists started shooting the students in their heads at a close range. “They killed our class-fellows and then left us in the main hall. I received a bullet in my foot,” the boy said. Paki begins three-day mourning and mass burials for its childrenPakistan on Wednesday began three days of mourning for the 132 children and nine school staff massacred by the Taliban in the country’s deadliest ever terror attack, as the world united in revulsion. Across the country many schools closed as a mark of respect, while those that opened held special prayers for the 141 killed in Tuesday’s assault on an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar.Schools, colleges, offices and markets were closed across Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, the northwestern province of which Peshawar is the capital.Funerals for the victims, many of whose bodies were pulled from the school still wearing their smart green uniforms drenched in blood, began late on Tuesday and the rest will be carried out on Wednesday.Eyewitnesses said the six attackers came in a white van and torched their vehicle before opening fire to scare away onlookers and clambering over a wall to enter the school.“One of them poured petrol over the vehicle and then set it alight. Then they opened fire in the streets and me along with another person ran away to save our life,” said witness Zabihullah, 12. Two Blasts Outside Girls College Near PeshawarTwo blasts have been heard near a girls college in Pakistan, where 132 children were killed in a massive terror attack by the Taliban at a Peshawar school yesterday. The explosions were reported in Dera Ismail Khan, another city in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province. he security forces rushed to the spot of the incident and cordoned off the area.According to some reports, no militant group has claimed the responsibility of the blasts as of now and no casualty has been reported. The nature of the blasts yet to be established.last_img read more

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