4 Jun
2021

Fake 50 euro notes in circulation

first_imgTwitter Print Advertisement Linkedin WhatsApp THE NUMBER of fake 50 euro notes circulating in Limerick was up this week, with seven incidents reported to Gardai.The duds were given in exchange for goods in various outlets across Limerick, mainly grocery stores, petrol stations, a pharmacy and a juice bar. In some of the instances the fraudsters managed to con staff, but in other cases, the forgeries were spotted and the notes were not accepted. On a couple of occasions staff held on to the fakes until gardai arrived.One of the culprits involved in trying to use these dud notes is described as a young red haired male of approximately 19 years and reported to have been wearing a navy tracksuit and runners at the time at the time of the attempted fraud.Gardai remind people to make sure and carry out essential security checks on euro notes. Obvious security features should be identified before accepting notes, these include; checking for the watermark, security thread, hologram patch and raised print. The value numeral on the 50 euro note will also change colour from purple to olive green or brown when tilted if the note is a genuine.By taking a few seconds to feel, examine and tilt euro notes, fraudsters can be prevented from passing off their fakes as the real thing.center_img Previous articleCollins family to march in honour of Roy’s deathNext articleLease Market’s Field for soccer, cllr pleads admin Email Facebook NewsLocal NewsFake 50 euro notes in circulationBy admin – May 7, 2009 2497 last_img read more

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30 Dec
2020

Turn It Off

first_img“You’ve got to be kidding me.”I dumped the contents of my dry bag onto the ground, picking through the soggy candy wrappers and first aid supplies until not a single item had gone unturned.“Daddio, let’s go!” my friend shouted from the river’s edge.It was six o’clock. Daylight was fading fast. Our group of three had decided not two hours earlier that we would try to squeeze in a lap down the Big Sandy, a class IV-V run at the heart of the Cheat River watershed. I’d waited an entire year to run this classic stretch of West Virginia whitewater, arranging my travels so I could be in the area when spring flows peaked. Though we’d be pressed for time, I was excited to get my personal first descent (PFD) and document the adventure with my trusty sidekick, a GoPro Hero 3+.The only problem? I’d forgotten the GoPro mount.“Dude, what took you so long?” my friend asked as I finally situated myself in the cockpit of my kayak and slid into the water.“I was looking for my GoPro mount,” I said.“Well, where is it?”“I forgot it.”My friend’s eyes widened. He rammed my boat with the bow of his.“What do you mean you forgot it,” he asked? “How are we gonna get shots of you coming off Wonder Falls?”“That’s not what it’s about,” I said, hardly convincing myself. “Let’s just paddle.”We set off downstream, and for the first half hour, I barely took notice of the immense rock walls rising from the river and the golden sunlight peeking over the treetops—I was too busy kicking myself for forgetting that stupid piece of plastic.In my mind, I could see the picture that I’d never have: the spray of Wonder Falls against an early evening haze, my green boat soaring off the lip of that glorious 20-footer, blade planted firmly, face part-bewildered, part-determined. No. There would be none of that. There would be no evening GoPro viewing over a round of beers, no posting a photo of my first waterfall run to Instagram, no proof that I’d even paddled the Big Sandy at all save for a bloody knuckle and my friend’s word.So would anyone believe that it had happened at all?This isn’t the first time I’ve struggled with being in the moment and wanting to document it, too. I once hiked for two hours in the dark to shoot a sunrise, only to realize at the summit that I’d left my camera battery plugged into the wall back home. And while, eventually, I was able to get past my irritation and enjoy the picturesque morning in technology-free, unadulterated bliss, I couldn’t help but let one dangerous thought sneak into my consciousness—I got up at 3 a.m. to hike for nothing.Of course, it wasn’t for nothing. While there would be no mountaintop selfie to share with my friends on Facebook, the scene of the rising sun illuminating the valley floor remains imprinted in my memory as clear as if I had seen it yesterday. Still, it got me thinking: why was I up there anyway? Was it really for the sunrise?There’s no denying that the reach of social media has extended far beyond our screens. Adventure photographers like Corey Rich and Renan Ozturk post to Instagram amid the world’s most extreme settings. From the Dawn Wall of El Capitan to the high altitude peaks of Myanmar in Southeast Asia, armchair travelers can revel in the exotic and the epic without ever leaving their desktop. These days, social media is inescapable, seemingly as essential to adventure as the adventure itself.But is that necessarily a bad thing? While it could be argued that social media platforms have taken away the mysteries of the world and exploited our natural playgrounds, particularly designated wilderness areas, is it possible to make the case that social media has actually played an important role in getting more people outside?Mike Cordaro is an active Strava user, but says the app doesn't dictate his time in the woods...mostly.Mike Cordaro is an active Strava user, but says the app doesn’t dictate his time in the woods…mostly.“It’s a double-edged sword for sure,” says Mark Eller, communications director for the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) and mastermind behind the online forum MTB Project.Eller has spent the better part of his life on a set of wheels. Just a few years ago, however, his obsession with riding took a different turn when he downloaded a new social media app designed with the competitive rider (and runner) in mind: Strava.Touted as an all-encompassing fitness app that logs everything from calories burned to GPS coordinates, Strava certainly isn’t the only app of its kind. But its ability to break down rides into segments and put users’ times against each other on a digital leaderboard has spurred a new generation of athletes to go hard in pursuit of their rightful place atop the cyber podium as King of the Mountain (or KOM).“We call them ‘Stravaletes’,” says New River Bikes owner Andrew Forron. “That or ‘Strava-assholes.’”If you couldn’t tell, Forron’s not the biggest fan of Strava. In fact, should you find yourself on a group ride in the New River Gorge with Forron at the helm, don’t be surprised if he asks you to turn it off. If you don’t, consider this: he’s not afraid to do it for you.“I think it’s terrible,” Forron says about Strava. “I think it’s changed how people interact together when they go places. It used to be when you went somewhere, you went to the bike shop, met the folks there, and tried to get in on their after-work ride.”Now, Forron says, cyclists don’t need the bike shop community to find the cool local loops in town—all they need is a little cell coverage and a Strava account.“It creates a false sense of community,” Forron adds, “and it’s caused more people to ride alone.”Though there’s undoubtedly some truth in Forron’s claim, for riders like Eller, Strava affords ambitious individuals an outlet for that need for speed.“It allows you to have a competitive riding experience wherever you are, whether you’re with someone else or not,” Eller says of the fitness app. “I’m a dad with a three-year-old and a six-year-old, and for a number of years, I haven’t been able to go out to races. Strava opened the door to get that competitive vibe back in my riding.”Mike Cordaro of Mount Pleasant, Penn., couldn’t agree more. Look up any route on Strava in the southwestern corner of Pennsylvania and Cordaro’s name is likely somewhere near the top five. In total, Cordaro’s racked up over 50 KOMs on his home turf in preparation for this year’s National Ultra Endurance (NUE) series, and says the app has helped him keep track of his weekly averages (three rides, 80 miles, seven and a half hours in the saddle).“I’m not chasing KOMs every time I go,” Cordaro says, “but it motivates me. I see other people ride [on Strava] and feel like I need to get after it.”And while Cordaro and Eller and, heck, even Forron, can agree that anything which motivates you to get on your bike is ultimately good, Strava has recently come under legal attack for influencing cyclists in particular to ride faster on trails that have no business being the stage for an unofficial time trial.“Public trails don’t necessarily make great race courses,” Eller says. “You have to be discerning about when and where it’s appropriate to gear your brains out.”“Strava’s not a reason to forgo trail etiquette,” Cordaro adds. “Ultimately, if [competitive cycling] is your goal, the best way to do that is racing.”Still, even Eller admits to allowing his competitive instincts to get the best of him, riding for weeks at a time without ever turning Strava off. But in a blog he posted on IMBA’s site titled “Confessions of a Strava Addict,” Eller brings up a good point, stating, “…it’s not like my nerdy geek posse wasn’t comparing times before Strava.” Whether by Garmin or by pencil and paper, mountain bikers have been keeping track of ride data for as long as mountain biking has existed.The only difference now? You can’t fudge the facts, something Maryland-based kayaker Ian Wingert knows all too well.Photo cred: Justin StephensPhoto cred: Justin StephensBack in early March, Wingert and two of his fellow paddlers, Todd Baker and Wyatt Hyndman, successfully navigated the first descent of Cucumber Falls outside of Ohiopyle, Penn. At almost 40 feet in height, Cucumber Falls isn’t the tallest waterfall to be run in the Laurel Highlands, but it’s likely the driest.“We knew it was going to run one to two days a year,” Wingert says. “We can’t really afford trips to Mexico or the Northwest, so when this came along, we knew we had to do it.”The crew had been scouting the line at Cucumber Falls for nearly three years but the water level was never high enough for an attempt. After a few days of heavy rain and snowmelt in late February 2015, however, the opportunity finally presented itself—it was now or never.With a friend setting safety at the bottom, all three paddlers styled clean lines over the drop. But it was in the pool below the falls that two of the three, Wingert included, got into trouble. A fallen log blocked the current’s main flow on river right, creating what’s referred to as a “strainer.” Though Wingert and Hyndman hit the log head-on, they flushed through and escaped unscathed. Baker altogether avoided the strainer and safely eddied out above, but as the three would soon find out, that log would prove to be the least of their problems.“The video made it look like we disregarded the fact that there was wood at the bottom and like we were disregarding safety,” Wingert says of the two-minute edit Baker compiled from their first descent footage.The video, which Wingert and Baker’s employer Immersion Research (one of the whitewater industry’s leading gear manufacturers) later posted to its Facebook page, attracted over 100,000 views and received nearly 2,000 shares in the first few hours of going live. The first descent was suddenly viral, but not without controversy.“Just dumb,” read one comment.“I’m calling that bad etiquette. Bad safety and stupid,” read another.Yet countless more comments rallied in defense of Wingert and his crew, arguing that, as with any adventure, not everything goes according to plan. Risk is inherent in any endeavor, especially when it comes to tackling first descents.Screen Shot 2015-03-05 at 1.05.17 PM“A lot of people who saw it as negative thought it was dumb luck, like we weren’t talented paddlers, just dumb kids with GoPros,” Wingert says. “It brought me down in the moment,” but not so much that he turned away from social media altogether.Whether he’s cranking out laps on the Top Yough in his backyard or making multi-day kayaking trips down to western North Carolina, Wingert is as active on social media as he is in a boat and says that Facebook in particular has been a useful tool in organizing paddling trips. What’s more, the ‘group’ function on Facebook allows area paddlers to post updates on rivers and creeks, notifying other river users about access issues, environmental threats, water levels, and, ironically, new strainers. A simple status update can rally a post-work group paddle. Stranded at the takeout without a shuttle?“It’s great for that kind of thing,” Wingert says. “It’s cool to see what everyone else is doing, unless you’re stuck at work and your friends are paddling.”While Wingert is hesitant to say whether or not he would ever attempt Cucumber Falls again, he is certain that his group won’t be the last. And as for the falls? A sign posted by state park officials the day after Wingert’s first descent now reads loud and clear.Cucumber Run closed to boating.Photo cred: Justin CostnerPhoto cred: Justin CostnerThe closure of Cucumber Run and the subsequent falls is just one of many instances where the power of social media has forced officials to respond in a way that’s not exactly favorable to outdoor enthusiasts. One of the biggest culprits these days? Instagram.“It’s a really touchy subject,” says western North Carolina-based photographer Justin Costner on shooting photography in public lands.Though Costner himself has never had any run-ins with the Forest Service, he’s heard enough horror stories about court dates and hefty legal fines that he’s taking the better-safe-than-sorry approach by purchasing a commercial photography permit.“I understand not violating the forest, but I think people should have the right to shoot photos from their adventures and trips,” he says.Costner, like any respectable outdoor recreationalist, practices Leave No Trace (LNT) principles and respects even the strictest of regulations in areas like the Linville Gorge Wilderness, but not all photographers are as considerate.In March 2014 for instance, popular Instagrammer Trevor Lee (@trevlee) was charged with nine misdemeanors for camping and climbing trees in undesignated areas of Yosemite in pursuit of a better angle. Later that same year, Casey Nocket (@creepytings) made national news when she posted Instagram photos of portraits she had painted on rocks in eight national parks. Though Nocket called it “art,” the park service had a different word for it: vandalism. Lee and Nocket are extreme examples of a gram-gone-bad, but their trials should serve as warning to Instagram users with tunnel vision for the perfect shot.In general, though, the average Instagram user is an amateur photographer with a trigger-happy finger and a desire to be inspired. That’s how Jessica Georgia (@jessicageorgia) came to decide to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail and document all 2,180 miles of the journey through her Instagram feed.“One of my passions and hobbies is photography,” Georgia says. “That’s initially what got me into Instagram, but then I started finding outdoor locations I didn’t even know existed.”From there, Georgia started getting inspired in a big way, and not just to take more photographs: hiking became her newfound love. The idea of thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail was romantic to Georgia, who, at 30 years old, is both a wife and a mother to a 12-year-old daughter. But when her family hiked through the Grayson Highlands during peak thru-hiking season, Georgia got the affirmation she needed that the A.T. was her calling.“It was so inspiring and I was so envious,” Georgia recalls, “but at the same time, I didn’t know if I could do it.”Yet just a year later, Georgia was taking her first steps along the white blaze at Springer Mountain. To ease the distance between mom-on-the-trail and family-at-home, Georgia says she tries to update her Instagram as frequently as possible so her daughter may be able to better grasp what a thru-hike actually entails.@jessicageorgia @jessicageorgiaTake a quick scroll through her feed and you’ll see the good and the bad of thru-hiking: swollen feet, bug bites, fellow hikers, trail angels, sweeping vistas. Following Georgia’s Instagram is about as close as you can get to hiking the trail yourself without ever leaving your home. And for Georgia, the supportive network of followers has been just as rewarding to her as the hike itself.“It’s encouraging when you can post something to Instagram and have people say, ‘That’s amazing Jess keep going!’ Having that community cheering you on is definitely a mental boost,” something that, as any thru-hiker can attest to, will surely brighten even the worst of days.Like Georgia, that sense of community is what I cherish about social media. Though my Facebook feed is often plagued with incoherent political and personal rants, it’s proven invaluable as a tool for making connections and finding story ideas. In fact, each and every one of the people I interviewed for this story were all contacted initially via social media, be it through Facebook or Instagram.But, as nearly all of my subjects pointed out, that’s not to say there aren’t pitfalls to the platforms. Do I think there’s such a thing as “oversharing”? Yes: I don’t need to see everything you eat. Do hashtags annoy me? When there are more hashtags than caption copy, most definitely. Does social media dictate the way I choose to spend my time in the outdoors?Absolutely not.As I sat atop that summit watching the rising of the sun, the weight of a battery-less camera sinking into my lap, I wasn’t thinking about the likes and comments I wouldn’t receive. I was thinking how damn lucky I was to be me in that moment witnessing one of the most overlooked miracles of this world.As Mark Eller from IMBA so simply put it, “People have to remember that you can turn it off if you want to.”So turn it off, if you want to.last_img read more

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26 Sep
2020

Government committed to the agriculture sector

first_imgGovernment has reaffirmed its commitment to the agriculture sector in Dominica.Hon. Matthew Walter (file photo)Agriculture Minister Mathew Walter told Parliament last week that from as far back as 2008, the government has been making significant investment, to cushion the rising cost of imputes to farmers on the island.He said “subsidies for the budget year 2008/09 amounted to $546,354.88, in 2009/10 $469,000.00, 2010/11 $506, 674.50, 2011/12 so far amounts to $194,286.91. Total to date for the past financial years amount to $1,716 316.29. Government pays forty cents of every dollar spent by farmers for fertilizers”.According to Walter, the government is providing support to the farmers brought about by the increased cost of external imputes are having on the farming community.“This is absolutely beyond the control of small states like ours and the government is ensuring that agriculture plays a fundamental role in achieving economic growth for its people,” he said.Walter noted that government has also provided resources for staff and certification in the citrus agriculture.“Citrus orchards have been undergoing complete rehabilitation for a while now. A lot of resources went towards the setting up of the infrastructure for the propagation. This is in direct response to the citrus virus that almost wiped out the industry a couple years ago,” he added.Dominica Vibes News Share Tweet LocalNews Government committed to the agriculture sector by: – February 29, 2012 Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! 10 Views   no discussions Sharelast_img read more

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26 Aug
2020

Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger named NL MVP

first_imgAfter his Rookie of the Year season in 2017, Bellinger took a step back in 2018, struggling particularly against left-handers in the second half, and he found himself platooned over the final months of the season, including the Dodgers’ World Series games against the Boston Red Sox.“It was a very humbling experience, for personal reasons, and I knew that wasn’t the player I wanted to be,” Bellinger said Thursday. “I just needed to find a way to be more consistent with myself. Hitting coaches Brownie (Brant Brown) and (Robert) Van Scoyoc really locked it down for me. When I was going through some things, we’d have great conversations. So there was help around me. It wasn’t just myself.”Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said it was evident “from the moment the 2018 season ended, he was a man on a mission to better understand his swing and to become a more complete hitter. The results of that work are being rewarded in the ultimate way.”Bellinger reaped that MVP reward despite being outperformed offensively by Yelich in nearly every category. Yelich finished first in the NL in batting average (.329, tied with Ketel Marte), on-base percentage (.429), slugging percentage (an MLB-best .671) and OPS (1.100, also the best in MLB). All of those numbers (plus his 44 home runs) were improvements over his 2018 MVP numbers.But Yelich suffered his season-ending knee injury on Sept. 10, limiting him to 130 games (while Bellinger appeared in 156 of the Dodgers’ 162 games). In his absence, the Brewers won 13 of their final 18 games, surging to a playoff spot in the National League.“We’re actually pretty good buddies right now,” Bellinger said of following Yelich’s season and the ‘Belli vs. Yeli’ MVP debate. “Without him having this good of a year – I think he pushed me to be a better player. He’s an unbelievable player but he’s honestly a better dude.”Bellinger was a better overall player in 2019. He led the majors in WAR (9.0 to Yelich’s 7.1) thanks to his elite defense (he won the NL Gold Glove for right field) and versatility, assets that no doubt caught voters’ attention.Related Articles The 24-year-old Bellinger is the sixth Dodger to win the NL MVP award since the franchise moved to Los Angeles, joining Maury Wills (1962), Sandy Koufax (1963), Steve Garvey (1974), Kirk Gibson (1988) and Clayton Kershaw (2014) and the 13th overall. He is only the third Dodger to win both a Rookie of the Year award and MVP during his career, joining Jackie Robinson and Don Newcombe.He is just the fourth player in MLB history to win a Rookie of the Year, Gold Glove and MVP all before age 25, joining Johnny Bench, Fred Lynn and Dustin Pedroia.When he heard the news, Bellinger was surrounded by his family and teared up as he received hugs from everyone including his father, former major-leaguer Clay Bellinger.“I honestly hadn’t cried in a long time,” Bellinger said later. “I think the last time was a few years ago when my dog died. That being said, I’ve never seen my dad show emotion either. So when I saw that, that really hit me right there.“It’s just a dream come true, man.” “I definitely think that helped,” Bellinger said. “I don’t know exactly what goes into the vote. But I’m glad I had the opportunity to show off what I could do out there this year.”Bellinger made his strongest MVP case in April and May. He was batting over .400 (.404) as late as May 21 and finished May batting .379 with 20 home runs and a 1.213 OPS.For the season, Bellinger added a Silver Slugger award to his Gold Glove by finishing with career-highs in nearly every offensive category – home runs (47, third in the NL), RBIs (115), an NL-leading 351 total bases, batting average (.305), on-base percentage (.406), slugging percentage (.629) and OPS (1.035, behind only Yelich and the Angels’ Mike Trout).He is the first Dodger to win a Gold Glove, Silver Slugger and the MVP award in the same season.“I had a ton of fun watching him this year,” Kershaw said of Bellinger. “It’s very well-deserved. What everyone says is true – great talent, great athlete, all that stuff. … But, man, he’s just a great baseball player and there is nothing else to say.”Dodgers first baseman Max Muncy (one eighth, one 10th) and pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu (one eighth) also received down-ballot votes.The MVP votes, cast prior to the postseason, came from two writers representing each of the 15 National League cities. They are tabulated on a system that rewards 14 points for first place, nine for second, eight for third on down to one for 10th. Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season The Cody Bellinger archiveDodgers’ Cody Bellinger wins Silver Slugger award for outstanding 2019 seasonCody Bellinger wins first career Gold Glove AwardDodgers’ Cody Bellinger feels bad for MVP rival Christian Yelich after season-ending injuryCody Bellinger, Mike Trout setting pace one-third of the way into 2019 MLB seasonWhicker: Cody Bellinger’s spring offensive might be good for all seasons Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Reduced to a platoon player late in the 2018 season and even benched at the start of World Series games, the Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger called that a “wake-up call” that fueled his offseason last winter.The result was a red-hot start to the 2019 season and an MVP award.Bellinger was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player on Thursday afternoon in just his third big-league season, edging 2018 winner Christian Yelich, who missed the final 18 games of the season with a fractured kneecap. Bellinger received 19 first-place votes, Yelich 10 and Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon one. Bellinger finished with 362 points in the weighted voting system, 45 more than Yelich.“It’s absolutely incredible,” Bellinger said after getting the news. “It’s what you dream of, for sure.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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12 Aug
2020

Harrison, Polamalu practice for Steelers

first_imgPITTSBURGH (AP)—The starting defense the Steelers thought they were getting when the season opened finally practiced together on Monday.There’s still no telling if the same 11 guys will suit up on Sunday against Philadelphia. JAMES HARRISON Injured stars James Harrison and Troy Polamalu were on the field as the Steelers (1-2) returned from their bye week. While Harrison remained vague about the chances his surgically repaired left knee will be ready to play for the first time this season, Polamalu is optimistic his strained right calf is no longer an issue.The perennial Pro Bowl safety says he felt “pretty good” and was grateful to see a slew of familiar faces on the practice field, Harrison’s included.“We’ll see what happens, but it’s been a while since we’ve all been on the field together,” Polamalu said. “There are some other new faces out there who have been permanent starters, so it’s all about how well 11 guys mesh on our defense.”The Steelers have struggled to generate much of a pass rush and the secondary had trouble in a 34-31 loss in Oakland on Sept. 23. Having a pair of healthy former Defensive Player of the Years would certainly help.“We just have to get ourselves on the winning side of things, because nobody cares about losing teams,” Polamalu said. “We just haven’t been executing that well, (so) whatever the call is that coach (Dick) LeBeau has made, we just haven’t been executing it that well at all. It really has nothing to do with the scheme of things. It’s just that we’re not executing and not performing well.”Harrison hasn’t played since a Wild Card loss to Denver in January. He struggled staying healthy during the offseason and underwent a minor procedure on Aug. 15. He returned to full practice last Tuesday but was not there on Wednesday, though he declined to label it a setback.If anything, Harrison wants to get in a game just so he’ll stop having to answer questions about his condition.“The constant questions, of course, just nags and irks on you,” said Harrison, who won’t have a better idea about his status until Friday.The Steelers could also get a boost to the running game with the possible return of Rashard Mendenhall, who hasn’t played since tearing the ACL in his right knee against Cleveland on New Year’s Day. He’s practiced regularly over the last three weeks and a comeback is imminent.“We’re gauging it, me and the coaches, and when we get to the point where we all think I can play then I’ll get back in there,” Mendenhall said.last_img read more

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12 Aug
2020

FPA proposes revisions to Rooney Rule

first_imgby Rob Maadi(AP)–After minority candidates were recently shut out by NFL teams for 15 top jobs, the Fritz Pollard Alliance wants the Rooney Rule to include coordinators, assistant head coaches and club president positions.The proposal sent Jan 22 to league executives came a week after no minorities were hired for eight coaching vacancies and seven general manager openings. There are only four minority head coaches going into the 2013 season, the fewest since 2003.“I think the league recognizes that these are the challenges we are dealing with when it relates to diversity and this is a plan of action that they can accept and be willing to work with,” John Wooten, chairman of the Fritz Pollard Alliance Foundation said. “I feel very comfortable that this will be extended into the Rooney Rule.”Robert Gulliver, the NFL’s executive vice president of human resources, said in a statement last week the hiring results were “disappointing” and anticipated making revisions.In a letter to Gulliver and Jeff Pash, the NFL’s executive vice president and general counsel, the alliance said: “We believe pipeline issues are a part of the reason we’ve seen a reduction in head coaches of color over the past few years, and this expansion will diversify the head coaching pipeline.”With teams trending toward hiring coaches with offensive backgrounds, it’s important for minorities to hold coordinator positions. Baltimore’s Jim Caldwell and Pep Hamilton, hired last week by Indianapolis, are the only minority offensive coordinators in the NFL.Caldwell, who led the Colts to a Super Bowl appearance in his first season in 2009, didn’t even get an interview for a coaching vacancy this offseason.“In this quarterback-dominated era, it seems clubs are increasingly looking for offensive coaches to fill head coaching positions in particular, and far too few minority coaches have been given offensive coordinator and play-calling responsibilities,” said Cyrus Mehri, co-founder and counsel of the FPA. “We want to see a special focus on offensive coordinator and play calling duties going forward. We have many experienced wide receiver and running back position coaches ready to be coordinators now.”Wooten said the Rooney Rule for coordinators wouldn’t apply to just-hired coaches because “it wouldn’t be fair to them” going into their interviews.“We made a differential in that the rule extends to a sitting coach when he starts to hire coordinators and assistant head coaches,” Wooten said. “It wouldn’t be fair to a coach coming in because that’s one of the real positives of a new coach when he’s sitting in that interview is to be able to tell them exactly who his staff will be and who has committed to coming with him.” OVERLOOKED–Baltimore Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell speaks during a news conference at the team’s practice facility in Owings Mills, Md., Jan. 17. The Ravens are scheduled to face the San Francisco 49ers in the 2013 Super Bowl on Feb. 3. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)last_img read more

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4 Aug
2020

RCDS Students Take Top Honors at Math League District Playoffs

first_imgRUMSON – Students from the Rumson Country Day School participated in the Math League District Playoffs at Solomon Schechter Day School of Greater Monmouth County and many came away with awards.Students from grades 3 through 6 competed. The event is sponsored by mathleague.org whose philosophy includes a belief that math contests should be a learning experience. To that end, students should be exposed to brand new problems at every contest, should be allowed to keep their test questions and completed answer sheets and should be given solutions to all problems at the conclusion of the contest.The third- and fourth-graders participated this year as a trial experiment. Each grade chose four students from teachers Sara Diaz in grade 3 and Erin Campanella in grade 4 while fifth- and sixth-graders competed against each other to select their team. This event represented the district-level competition with the next level being states. Students met five times after school to prepare for the contest.“Congratulations to all the RCDS math team participants for an awesome showing at the Math League Tournament at Solomon Shecter,” said Jayne Carmody, head of The Lower School. “We are so very proud of all our students. The children have proven to be great competitors, superior math students and represented RCDS so well! Best of all, each student, trophy or not, came home smiling and proud of their participation!”There were individual and team awards for each grade that competed.The third grade team of Alexander Mitchell (Red Bank), Katharine Balestro (Rumson), Hanaway Croddick (Rumson) and Morgan Skove (Rumson) took 1st place. Individual certificates were achieved by Alexander Mitchell (1st place), Hanaway Croddick (2nd place), Katharine Balestro (4th place) and Morgan Skove  (9th place).The fourth grade participants were Ainsley Gmelich (Rumson), Christopher Hall (Little Silver), Sarah Silbert (Holmdel) and Anthony Whittemore (Rumson).The fifth grade participants were Gannon Carroll (Rumson), Elizabeth Huesman (Fair Haven), Miles Skove (Rumson) and Christopher Maida (Red Bank). Individual awards went to Miles Skove (2nd place) and Gannon Carroll (6th place).In the sixth grade, the team of Elias Economou (Monmouth Beach), Taylor Harrison (Fair Haven), Madeleine Reinhard (Rumson), Abigail Devine (Rumson) and Sammy Lyle (Fair Haven) won their grade-level team competitions. Individual certificates were achieved by Noah Lee of Colts Neck (1st place), Sammy Lyle (3rd place), Madeleine Reinhard (4th place), Madeline Mitsch of Rumson (9th place) and Christian Molnar of Rumson (10th place).“At RCDS, we love any opportunity for our children to put their learning to use, whether in a project, a trip, or a competition,” said Head of The Upper School Bill Lamb. “Math League provides just this chance, where our kids can celebrate their academic skills and feel pride about demonstrating their learning. When kids can do some hard work, earn some positive feedback and feel validated for their efforts, they gain self-respect that is irreplaceable. Everyone knows it is good to excel at math, but these children have now experienced the rewards of excellence. We thank the Math League for this chance.”All students who finished in the top five in their grade level will now compete at the state competition.last_img read more

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4 Aug
2020

Little Silver’s Riccio Lauded in Sports Betting Decision

first_imgBy Jay Cook |LITTLE SILVER – Ronald J. Riccio can recall spending days at Monmouth Park as an eight-year-old boy, watching alongside his father and his father’s best friend as thoroughbreds sprinted around the track.The racetrack’s never been more than a few miles away from his Little Silver home.But Riccio, now 71, has supported the Oceanport racing institution in a different manner over the past few years. He had turned his weekend racing program in for an extensive law brief as the lead counsel for the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, representing Monmouth Park, through the Murphy v. NCAA Supreme Court case fighting for legalized sports betting.After a decision disbanding the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) of 1992 was decided Monday from the court – meaning all states can have a legal and regulated sports wagering industry – Riccio was relieved to know his beloved venue will not be shuttering any time soon.“I know so many people over there, many of my best friends I met at Monmouth Park,” Riccio told The Two River Times on Tuesday. “To be able to have a hand in keeping a place that holds so many memories for me alive and to help it flourish is just icing on the cake.”Riccio is a former dean of Seton Hall University School of Law from 1988 to 1999 and has been practicing law for well over four decades. Murphy v. NCAA was his first case in front of the Supreme Court, but Riccio said he never felt the nerves nor wavered in his support of Monmouth Park.The crux of the case was based on overturning PASPA, a federal law which allowed sports betting only in Nevada and three other states. New Jersey had tried since 2011 to permit legalized sports betting after a statewide referendum permitted lawmakers to legalize it but was challenged twice by the four major professional sports leagues and the NCAA in the coming years. Lawmakers had crafted two bills and even suffered a veto from then-Gov. Chris Christie throughout that time.Though above all, Murphy v. NCAA “is a landmark decision,” said Riccio. “The effect of the decision is to narrow the federal government’s power and to expand the state’s sovereign rights to regulate its people as it wants to regulate them.”Riccio, who taught constitutional law for over 20 years at Seton Hall University, said this case could have major implications with future states’ rights issues currently in the news. Decisions down the road on marijuana legalization, sanctuary city creation and environmental regulations could reference this sports betting case.But the immediate impact will be on Monmouth Park as it’s set to take New Jersey’s first legal sports wagers later this summer. Predictions are that sports betting in New Jersey could be a $10 billion industry, some estimate.“Monmouth Park has been for several years trying to stay alive as a viable, self-sustaining racetrack that employs hundreds of people, that has a huge impact on the state economy, on the preservation of open spaces,” said Riccio.“Just to be able to relieve the anxiety that all the workers over there were feeling about the future of Monmouth Park, to me, that’s as gratifying as anything else,” he added.While the four major sports leagues and the state’s high-priced legal representation captured interest, it was Riccio and his team at McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney and Carpenter who helped lay the legal groundwork for the case, said Edward B. Deutsch, founder and managing partner of the firm.“Ron and our people, the brief work and the strategy, was brilliant,” Deutsch told The Two River Times this week. “I think that he and our team, more than anybody, is responsible for this result.”Deutsch said Riccio is “the best constitutional lawyer in New Jersey.”Former state Sen. Joseph Kyrillos Jr., who sponsored state bills in support of legalized sports betting, said the Supreme Court decision “will create jobs, revitalize our horse industry and boost tourism for the areas surrounding Monmouth Park.”Kyrillos added that “few understand it was Dean Ron Riccio and the McElroy Deutsch law firm that forced this outcome.”last_img read more

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3 Aug
2020

Minor Baseball Season in full swing

first_imgThe minor baseball season is in full swing throughout the West Kootenay, and in the Heritage City, the Nelson Jays are out to defend West Kootenay Babe Ruth Baseball Championship won in 2015.The Jays met Castlegar this past week at Queen Elizabeth Park. Both teams battle the opposition, and the weather, during this mid-week contest with the host team coming out on top.The NDBA has fields teams in six divisions — Tee-Ball, Rookie, Minor, Major, Junior and Senior Babe Ruth.The teams play at Queen Elizabeth Lions Park.Nelson plays in the West Kootenay Minor Baseball leaqgue, which  runs until the middle of June when playoffs close out the house league campaigns.The West Kootenay teams — Grand Forks, Fruitvale, Castlegar, Trail and Nelson — then form all-star squads to participate in provincial play.last_img read more

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2 Aug
2020

GO WEST MARIE STRETCHES OUT TO TAKE $125,000 FRAN’S VALENTINE STAKES BY 1 ¼ LENGTHS UNDER STEVENS; TRUMAN TRAINEE GETS MILE ON TURF IN 1:38.81

first_imgFILLY BY WESTERN FAME TAKES GOLDEN STATE SERIES RACE FOR CALIFORNIA-BRED OR SIRED OLDER FILLIES & MARES ARCADIA, Calif. (May 23, 2015)–Favored Go West Marie stretched out off of three consecutive sprints to win Saturday’s $125,000 Fran’s Valentine Stakes by 1 ¼ lengths, while covering one mile on turf under Gary Stevens in 1:38.81. Trained by Eddie Truman and owned by Peter Redekop BC, Ltd., the 4-year-old filly by Western Fame appeared on the muscle early but settled into a stalking trip en route to notching her fourth stakes win and seventh win from 20 starts. (The Fran’s Valentine, run as Santa Anita’s sixth race, was the second in a series of five Golden State Series stakes for horses bred or sired in California).“The key with her is to get relaxed,” said Stevens. “When Rafael (Bejarano, aboard eventual sixth place finisher Wild in the Saddle) was getting out pretty good going into the first turn, it gave me a little bump to get out and she got a little aggressive. Once I got her back midway around the turn, she switched off for me and she has an explosive kick. She outclassed these fillies today.”The 3-5 favorite in a field of eight older fillies and mares, Go West Marie paid $3.40, $2.60 and $2.40. The win improved her overall mark to 20-7-2-5, and with the winner’s share of $75,000, she ran her earnings to $557,520.“Gary loved her at a mile,” said Truman, who is enjoying perhaps his best year as a conditioner. “We both think she’s actually better going a mile. Today it scared me with that slow pace, and he rode her like the champion rider that he is. He said ‘Hey, we’re not saving ground. We’re the best horse and here we come.”Ridden by Santiago Gonzalez, Chati’s On Top rallied from last to finish second, one length in front of longshot My Monet. Dispatched at 7-1, Chati’s On Top paid $5.20 and $3.40.Ridden by Gonzalo Nicolas, My Monet set the pace to the furlong pole and tired to finish third, three quarters of a length in front of Mangita. Off at 16-1, My Monet paid $6.60 to show.Fractions on the race were 24.33, 49.68, 1:14.47 and 1:26.78. –last_img read more

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