23 Jun
2021

Old hands lead Ulster to Scarlets

first_imgTAGS: Ulster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 2. Ravenhill Park3. Ravenhill Park Gardens There will also be parking restrictions in place in the Castlereagh area (Mount Merrion Avenue). Supporters are encouraged to make use of the Park ‘n’ Ride facilities at Pirrie Park and along Montgomery Road. Your co-operation is gratefully appreciated.center_img Brian McLaughlin has named an experienced team to face the Scarlets in tomorrow night’s vital Magners League game at Ravenhill. BJ Botha and Ian Humphreys are drafted straight into the starting line up after spells out injured. Botha (elbow) has not featured since the Heineken Cup match against Biarritz in January, while Humphreys (hamstring) has not played since the end of February. Andrew Trimble also returns to the starting team after missing the last two games through injury but Stephen Ferris continues to be ruled out with a knee problem. Rory Best takes over the captaincy from Johann Muller on his return to the starting XV. He played 15 minutes against Glasgow last week after returning from 6 Nations duty and will start alongside Botha and Tom Court in an all-international front row. In the back row Willie Fallon gains a start at openside flank in place of Chris Henry who drops to the bench. The backline has also been re-shuffled as Ruan Pienaar moves back to scrum half to allow Humphreys to take the No10 jersey. Adam D’Arcy comes in at fullback as Simon Danielli moves to the wing and Craig Gilroy starts on the bench. The other wing berth is occupied by Trimble who has replaced 20 year old Conor Gaston. Ulster are on a run of five straight wins, with three of those coming courtesy of last-gasp kicks. The last time Ulster won six in a row they went on to win the league in 2005/06. They currently occupy third position in the table and will face a stern test against their fellow play-off contenders. A win tonight is not only important for their Magners League challenge but they will be hoping for victory and an improved performance ahead of next week’s Heineken Cup quarter final against Northampton. Ulster Team v Scarlets (Magners League, Ravenhill, Friday 1st April, kick-off 7.05pm) (15-9): A D’Arcy; A Trimble, N Spence, P Wallace, S Danielli; I Humphreys, R Pienaar;(1-8): T Court, R Best, BJ Botha, J Muller (capt), D Tuohy, R Diack, W Faloon, P Wannenburg;Replacements (16-23): A Kyriacou, P McAllister, D Fitzpatrick, T Barker, C Henry, P Marshall, I Whitten, C Gilroy. Ulster Rugby would advise supporters coming to the game (gates open 5.30pm) to avoid parking in the immediate vicinity of the Ravenhill Grounds and that the following roads are only accessible for residents and closed to everyone else: 1. Onslow Paradelast_img read more

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23 Jun
2021

1 million fan milestone for Toulouse

first_imgThat took their overall total to 978,331 fans ahead of the return game against the leaders of the English Premiership and last season’s Amlin Challenge Cup champions. Four times Heineken Cup champions Toulouse will reach another tournament milestone this weekend when they become the first team to notch 1 million fans at their home matches in Europe’s premier club tournament.Guy Noves’ side were the inaugural winners of the competition and were also the first team to win the title three times. They were the first club to play 100 games and still lead the way with 121.Sunday’s Pool 6 clash with Harlequins at Le Stadium will be their 55th home game and, with more than 30,000 tickets already sold for the game, the turnstiles will tick through the 1,000,000 mark.At the end of last season Toulouse had clocked up 959,831 paying customers and they opened their home account in this the 17th season of Heineken Cup rugby with an 18,500 crowd at Stade Ernest-Wallon for their win over Gloucester Rugby in Round 1. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Toulouse became the first team this season to beat Quins with last weekend’s 21-10 at the Twickenham Stoop and the European giants will break another record on Sunday.“Toulouse have been setting the benchmark for clubs around Europe ever since they entered the Heineken Cup back in 1995. Where they have led, others have sought to follow,” said ERC Chief Executive, Derek McGrath. “Becoming the first team to attract 1 million fans is another significant milestone for Toulouse and I congratulate their teams both on and off the field for their continued success.”last_img read more

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23 Jun
2021

Five things we learnt about rugby – December

first_img Cold Bath: Leroy Houston feels the pain of a fifth league defeat this season (Pic: Action Images) Bright skies for Eddie Jones and Welsh fans, dark clouds for Bath, Toulouse and Ireland’s provincial heavyweights – there’s a lot to discuss… Welsh rugby is in a very different place this year than it was last. And whilst the maintenance of the Christmas crowds through the rest of the Pro12 campaign remains unrealistic this year, over the next five years it may not.Toulouse disappoint everyone in EuropeToulouse have five points in their Champions Cup group, just five, compared to the 19 of pool leaders Saracens. This may not seem out of place given the military efficiency of Saracens this season, but Toulouse’s performances in Europe last month fell inexcusably short of their performances in the Top 14, where they lead the way with Racing 92 and Clermont Auvergne.Focusing on their domestic league is one thing but Toulouse have a greater responsibility, in the Champions Cup, than just to themselves.Gripping stuff: Ulster tackle Alexis Palisson in their win at Toulouse (Pic: Inpho/Presseye)When you enter arguably the toughest club tournament in the game you aren’t playing to merely please your club’s stakeholders, you’re also beholden to TV audiences and sponsors. Toulouse’s performance at Ulster was shameful; they didn’t make a single line break, which, combined with the subsequent home loss in the return fixture, has seriously distorted the group.Toulouse have a fine history in Europe, having won the top competition four times, and whilst they may no longer have the most powerful pack, nor most skilful back-line, 100% commitment is the minimum requirement from well-paid professional rugby players.Irish provinces recedingThis will be incredibly well received over the Irish Sea… I can already hear the knives being sharpened on the Blarney Stone. But as was evident in December, the Irish provinces are no longer in the same buying space as the Aviva and Top 14 teams.Whilst all four provinces occupy a position in the top six of the Pro12, the true measure for Europe’s elite club is the Champions Cup. Although Ulster have been highly competitive in Pool One, the performances of Munster and in particular Leinster have fallen way short of the glory years – and the simple reason is money.Fading force? Munster and Leinster are both struggling in the Champions Cup (Pic: Inpho)For Leinster and Munster to be out of contention in Europe, in December, is unusual, but the situation has been building for two seasons. We don’t even need an in-depth conversation about relative incomes, private finance and TV deals – we simply need to look at the squads. Neither have the buying power to retain, nor replace, the quality of player that they could during the mid to late Noughties where both were able to dominate the European competition. Tepid BathBath lie eighth in the Aviva Premiership with a squad that could and should be league contenders. This is a club that splashes the cash like Michael Jackson did in the 1980s but they’ve made some weird purchases – they have more No 8s than some teams have props.Bath currently have the feel of a management simulation game on a PC, where the buying of players and administration issues take precedence, whilst the on-field stuff is presumed to be an automatic function. But rugby doesn’t work like that, and it certainly isn’t working like that at Bath.They have a points difference of just plus six, which reeks when you consider that they have backs such as George Ford, Anthony Watson, Jonathan Joseph, Nikola Matawalu and Semesa Rokoduguni. Even with a struggling forward platform, you would expect a back-line of that quality to be finishing a high percentage of turnover ball – which they aren’t.Last weekend’s defeat by Newcastle Falcons, if not being the final nail in the coffin, certainly means that the nails and wood have been ordered from Travis Perkins. The situation needs sorting sharpish, as owner Bruce Craig probably didn’t envisage Bath playing in next year’s Challenge Cup.A Happy New Year for Eddie JonesWhilst the rest of us are wringing our internal organs dry and squeezing our squidgy limbs into gym clothes like a Georgian sausage machine, Eddie Jones has the new year and the world at his feet.With his clean slate now chalked up with the names of his desired coaching staff, Jones has the chance to drastically change the blueprint of English rugby by selecting some of the most exciting talent in Europe – English talent which ripped its way through European competition in December.Super Maro: Saracens’ Maro Itoje, here taking on Oyonnax, is pressing his England case (Pic: AFP/Getty)It’s an opportunity that international coaches dream of and one that no other home nations coach has. There are no relationships with players, no favourites and no certainties. Those players who once confidently sang on the back seats of the England bus may now be sitting in silence on their sofa come the Six Nations – allowing the likes of Elliot Daly, Henry Slade, Matt Kvesic and the remarkable Mario Itoje to move English Test rugby forward. Good luck, Mr Jones.Feel-good factor returns to WalesWelsh rugby in December wasn’t about player statistics, team selections or politics. It was about supporters. The Christmas and New Year derbies saw sell-outs at the regional grounds, which is a fantastic achievement for all of the commercial teams involved.Many will argue that festive sell-outs have always been thus, and that is true. But this season’s fixtures felt different; they were also bolstered by scores of positive news and signings from around the regions.Put it here: Ospreys duo James King and Tom Habberfield thank fans in France (Pic: Huw Evans Agency)The region’s grounds, and surrounding pubs, weren’t full of negative chat regarding marquee Welsh signings moving to England and France, it was largely about players coming home. The usual bar-room din had turned into a buzz, and pertained to Rhys Webb, Dan Biggar and Scott Williams remaining in Wales.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The demise of Irish cash, particularly the loss of the hugely talented Ian Madigan to Bordeaux-Begles, is a real worry for Irish rugby and the Pro12 as a whole.For the latest subscription offers to Rugby World, click here.last_img read more

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23 Jun
2021

Hotshot: Australia U20 back-row Fraser McReight

first_imgI was going to get moved to prop at 14 because I was chunky, but Mum blew up at the coaches. I was able to grow and slim up, and that’s why I’m here now!My parents ride the waves of emotions with me but only want the best for me.What are your strengths? Leadership… and my running and support game.When did you link up with Queensland Reds?I signed a two-year contract before the 2019 season. It’s been awesome to learn off some experienced players and the team is still young, so we all get along.What do you want to achieve in the next 12 months? To start for the Reds – get solid game time week in, week out, and then everything after that should take care of itself.How do you switch off from rugby? I play golf. I’m also studying business, majoring in accounting, at Queensland University of Technology.RW VERDICT: One of the standout performers in the U20 World Cup, where he led his team to the final for the first time since 2010, McReight marries his physicality with brilliant skills in the loose. Expect to see him become a Reds regular in 2020. This article originally appeared in the September 2019 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Australia U20 back-row Fraser McReightDate of birth 19 February 1999 Born Buderim, QLD Franchise Reds Country Australia Position Back-rowWhat sports have you played? I’ve played cricket and rugby most of my life, starting as early as I could. However, I stopped playing cricket to turn my attention to volleyball at 15.I first got involved with rugby when I was five, for the Albany Creek Brumbies for ten years. I loved it – I basically got put into rugby because I had too much energy for my mum and dad! I started playing for Brisbane Grammar School at 13 and for two years played schools rugby on Saturday and club rugby on Sunday.Talk us through your representative honours… Queensland U18 Sevens, Queensland Schoolboys and Australia Schoolboys.I played for the Junior Wallabies in the Oceania U20 Championship and Junior World Cup last year as well as this year.What do you like about rugby?I love competing but I also enjoy the mateship and the celebrations after a game; having a beer in the sheds with your best mates!Who were your childhood heroes? I loved watching Sam Warburton’s highlights on YouTube. And George Smith because of Rugby 2005 (PlayStation game). He was on the cover and I remember his awesome dreads!Who has been the biggest influence on your career? My first XV coaches and my coaches who had me in my first year at Brothers after I left school just made me enjoy my rugby, but most importantly my parents. Aussie prospect Fraser McReight looked up to Sam Warburton and George Smith growing upcenter_img Leading man: Fraser McReight in action at the U20 World Cup (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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20 Jun
2021

Thank you, God for cancer

first_img Elizabeth Phillips says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev Canon Nancy Platt says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Dorian McGlannan says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT October 5, 2012 at 4:51 pm Dear Catherine… I too had breast cancer when I had b een in my congregation in Maine for four years. Since I wrote a book on Cancer Care and was an oncology chaplain for a time, I was very proactive and insisted that the surgery be done ASAP. My Bishop said I had discovered the cure for terminal uniqueness and I quess he was right. I decided since stress plays a part in CA not to pursue my PhD even though I had been accepted at a seminary in Mass. So I am alive and well today after 25 years. I worry sometimes but at 75 I now I have been very fortunate. I was back at work two weeks later and even had the termacity to accept a call to be shortlisted for the Suffragan Bishop of Philadelpha with drains hanging from my side. Ah well Glad to hear your’ well peace and go for it Nancy Platt Fr.Michael Neal says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI October 5, 2012 at 5:23 pm Thank you for writing. I too am a priest and a stage 3 breast cancer survivor. I learned a great deal through my experience of cancer and my congregation was amazing. Your article has finally motivated me to write my as yet unwritten article about what can happen in a congregation when the rector gets seriously ill. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel December 29, 2012 at 7:37 pm Catherine… thank you for sharing your wisdom and journey. I too am a Stage III infiltrative ductal carcinoma of the breast. I want to affirm your thoughts. I am a priest of 7 years and an RN of 36 years. I am a straight shooter when it comes to dealing with life and the living thereof. I am not one for platitudes or cliches`. Nor did I feel that your commentary presented them. I AM a better person for having had cancer. My husband and my daughters ARE better people because I have had cancer. We have made a tough journey together and have ended up in a place far better than we would have had I not had this, regarding dealing with the living of life and dealing with the reality of death, and preventative health care. The whole nine yards. I have been blessed by the kindness and love of strangers and a community of the faithful that have renewed my faith and my joy. May you continue to be blessed now and always. I would hope that those who have not had a healing journey through the cancer experience get cancer care counseling or grief counseling to deal with the myriad of emotions this diagnosis creates. October 5, 2012 at 6:35 pm Are you kidding me? My husband died from cancer and left me a widow at the age of 45. He left a grieving son, 14, and a grieving daughter, 11. I am a cradle Episcopalian who is not angry at God. I am angry at people like you who say that I am stronger because of the cancer and my loss. I watched my husband endure three operations, two rounds of chemotherapy, a month of radiation. He died a slow, painful death. I do not in a million years believe that this was God’s plan to teach me or my children grace or love or community. Cancer happens and it sucks. I do, however, believe that God loves me and mourns my loss with me without trying to reveal any cliches or platitudes. Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 11, 2013 at 10:27 am Dear Catherine, First let me say how much I admire your faith. Your love of God is so strong, especially after all that you have been through. Your strength and courage speaks a multitude. I helped found a site called healtheo360.com which allows people with chronic conditions to share their stories via video & storytelling. I think your story is extremely uplifting and motivational and we would love to have you join our community & share your story with our members. Please take a minute to visit our site & if you like what you see I would be grateful if you signed up and became a member. Everything offered on our site is 100% free, we are just trying to raise awareness for debilitating conditions. Healtheo360 was founded earlier this year by David Duplay after his 32 year old sister-in-law was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer. After unsuccessful efforts with cancer support group meetings, due to the widening age gap between herself and other stage 4 breast cancer patients, the family was forced to search for other outlets of social support. This was the birth of Healtheo360. I should also mention that Dave’s mother is suffering from mid-stage Alzheimer’s and his father, who is in good health, is her caregiver for the time being until she will require supervised care in a facility. Thank you for sharing your story! Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Press Release Service Health & Healthcare October 8, 2012 at 1:55 pm CANCER in remission for 10 years….I have learned about gratitude and the loving caress of God…Thank you St Luke’s Evanston, Il for the Healing Ministers at Sunday Mass. God created… andsaw it was good. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: This piece first appeared online in The Huffington Post‘s Religion Section.I am an Episcopal priest serving two congregations in Buffalo, N.Y. Two years ago this Thursday, on Oct. 4, 2010, I was diagnosed with breast cancer.My prayer, as I was listening to the doctor say the words, “invasive, lobular carcinoma,” came suddenly and clearly: “Gracious God be with me through this journey, allow me to walk it with dignity and grace. And help me to be grateful, whatever may be.”Thanks be to God, that prayer was answered — and then some.As I awoke in the recovery room at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, I was so overwhelmed, so overcome with gratitude that the only prayer I could utter through the tears was “thank you.”Thank you.Thank you for the presence of a world class cancer institute in my backyard.Thank you for the newly arrived surgeon, who full of smarts and compassion, full of determination and grace, removed the cancer from me and painstakingly poked and prodded until she was sure — absolutely, positively sure — that all of the cancer was gone. That anything that looked or felt suspicious was removed. That the margins were checked, double checked and triple checked. That lymph nodes were felt and if not absolutely normal in texture and appearance, were also removed.Thank you, God, for the community of family and friends huddled in that waiting room who sat for hours, praying, laughing, crying and worrying. Hoping for the best, fearing the worst and believing. Believing that whatever the outcome, they, through the grace of God, would help me get through it all.Thank you God for the two communities of faith I serve — people who prayed me through that day, who prayed in the days leading up to it and all the days that followed. A community of love that walked with me in good times and in bad, who rejoiced with every victory and lamented every set back. A community whose trust in the peace of God, truly surpasses all understanding.Thank you God for faith. For the indescribable, ever present belief that whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure comes from the love of God, poured out for us through Jesus Christ. (Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians).Thank you, God, for cancer.Yes, thank you for cancer.Because of cancer I learned lessons I didn’t know I needed to learn. Because of cancer I discovered a depth of love, faith and gratitude I never knew existed. Because of cancer, I learned that bad news is best handled when infused with the Good News. The Good News of Faith, the Good News of Love, the Good News of Gratitude.There are thousands upon thousands of people who are diagnosed with breast cancer each and every year. Not all the outcomes are as good as mine. People die, people suffer, people mourn. Children grow up without mothers, spouses grow old alone, friends are left with holes in their hearts.Cancer is not for sissies. Cancer is not fun. Cancer stinks. But through the grace of God and the power of prayer and the faith of a community, cancer made me a better priest, a better pastor, a better person.On Oct. 18, I, along with two sister priests and a deacon, all of us breast cancer survivors, will lead an open service of Healing, Hope, Gratitude and Remembrance for all those affected by Breast Cancer. The service will take place at the Episcopal Diocese of Western New York Ministry Center. People of all faiths or no faith are invited. We will sing, we will shout “hallelujah,” we will lament. For Breast Cancer, though it has personally given me much, has taken way too much from far too many.Breast Cancer is treatable, and early detection is the key. In my family alone five have been diagnosed early enough to be treated quickly and in some cases, aggressively. It has worked. So ladies, get those mammograms, do self-exam and, if you hear the news I heard two years ago, may you, through the power of pray and the fellowship of community, be filled with gratitude and health, all the days of your life.— The Rev. Catherine B. Dempesy has been an Episcopal priest for four years. Currently she serves as the rector of two historic parishes in the city of Buffalo, NY: The Church of the Good Shepherd in the Parkside neighborhood and the Church of the Ascension in the Allentown neighborhood. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (7) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL center_img gloria G FLUCKE says: Rector Washington, DC Sarah Mekhail says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Catherine B. DempesyPosted Oct 5, 2012 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA October 5, 2012 at 8:19 pm Glad all went well sister Catherine…….God is good…………and let us continue to prayer for those with cancer and those affected by it………………God bless………………….. Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Thank you, God for cancer Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rev. Ruth B Paulus says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img
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20 Jun
2021

Swift reaction follows rejection of women as bishops in England

first_img Jesse Green says: Fr. Michael Neal says: November 21, 2012 at 12:37 pm This once again causes me to question membership in the Anglican Communion – our heritage stems from the Cof E and the glass ceiling imposed here makes no sense. Hugh Magee says: November 21, 2012 at 4:48 pm If you’re going to insist on following Leviticus you have to follow ALL of it, not just the parts that suit your particular biases. You know, like not shaving or cutting your hair. Or not planting your fields with different kinds of seed. Or not wearing clothing made of blended fabrics. Or not eating shellfish or pork products. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Women’s Ministry Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab November 21, 2012 at 11:02 am Regarding Susan Russell’s comment above, don’t forget that there are some of us who are sane on this side of the pond (in Scotland): the Scottish Episcopal Church has authorised the ordination of women to the episcopate.As a kind of postscript I can report that our own bishop (Brechin) is currently in Swaziland, where he has been attending the ordination of +Ellinah Wamukoyah as Africa’s first woman bishop. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs November 21, 2012 at 11:10 am I am just curious as to where this fear comes from in having a bishop who is a woman. If women have been allowed to be ordained as deacons and priests, then why is the episcopacy out of reach for women who have served God, their communities of faith, and the Church of England just as ordained men have in the past? My thoughts and prayers go out to my sisters and brothers in England who have been hurt by this action. My thoughts and prayers also go out to my sisters and brothers in England who have voted no. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service November 21, 2012 at 12:29 pm Amen to Jim Lynch Karen Fern says: November 24, 2012 at 2:11 pm Does anyone think that the Church of England’s rejection of women bishops isn’t of a piece with the conservative (okay, reactionary) position on ordination of gay men and women both as priests and as bishops? The American church is way ahead on this but it has been a traumatic sequence of events for the American Episcopalians and the Episcopal church is fracturing over it. I would have thought that the church was beyond that kind of hysterical flapping of hands. Karen Fern says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 patrick Bone says: Rector Shreveport, LA November 21, 2012 at 1:33 pm As Church teaches to clear our anger before the sun set, now is the time to set an example by Church to show that what Church teaches practice the same. We all work for glory of God not for woman or man power, or to be first in the history. There is no winner or loser with outcome of the election, if we believe all men and women are holy. November 21, 2012 at 4:41 pm It is time for the C of E to awaken to the fact that the Bible is inerrant. There are very clear statements as to what a Bishop, Priest and Deacon are to be and how they are to live and what standards they are to meet. Under no circumstances are women allowed under these edicts into the role of clergy. There are appropriate places for women religious and that is as a NUN. There is plenty of work for them to do there as they have for thousands of years. They are unwanted and unwelcome in the male role of clergy. Women are NOT to teach men anything. They don’t have the capability, stability nor the blessing of God to take over male roles.Should a woman wish to do so it would be best she leave the C of E or Episcopal Church in the USA and take themselves to another church. One that is unbiblical and allows women in roles that are against all nature.There is a place for women and it is certainly not in the [email protected] Rector Tampa, FL David Yarbrough says: November 21, 2012 at 1:14 pm Once again, the Anglican Communion (in the persona of the Church of England) tries to rewrite Scripture to suit the purposes of secular society.The first letter of Paul to Timothy, chapter 2, explicitly bars women from teaching (i.e., establishing and promoting the discipline and doctrine of the Church).The Church of England (along with TEC) chooses to ignore this scripture just as aggressivvely as it disregards Leviticus 18:22.As Christians we are charged to teach the Bible as given to the Saints, acknowledging and repenting of our own sins – not to pick and choose those teachings we’re comfortable with. To do otherwise puts the Church on a slippery slope toward destruction. November 24, 2012 at 2:18 pm The Bible is NOT inerrant but is indeed a guide to living a life pleasing to God . It is not a straitjacket. It is an invitation. November 21, 2012 at 3:03 pm The Bible…not to be taken literally as scripted, but literally in truth. And I do believe we pick and choose all the time…otherwise we would be sad shape…missing eyes, etc. November 21, 2012 at 12:58 pm Mr. Lynch’s comments are absolutely on the mark. However, logic has been a missing ingredient in the church for the past 2000 years. Who expects that to change? November 23, 2012 at 12:14 am I’ve heard it said that anyone who followed all 600 plus laws of Leviticus would rightfully be put in prison. Jim Lynch says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 24, 2012 at 2:16 pm NO, you are bound to teach the Bible as relevant to people living here and now rather than 2,000 years ago. No wonder you are the butts of jokes — and not even good jokes. Jesus said that the Sabbath was made for man and not man for the Sabbath. Well, following that, we are bound to look at the Bible as something living and breathing and not something that died ages ago and that is being used not as support but as a straitjacket. When I was in grad school for Theology, I was taught that the Bible is a document and that it had to be analyzed for content and meaning rather than being understood literally. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis November 23, 2012 at 5:00 am I agree with Archbishop Rowan remarks in the audio file that the Church of England has ‘some explaining to do’. His commitment to ‘gradual change’, demonstrated in this and earlier debates, has again been shown to be well-intentioned but misguided. The damage done by slow attempts at finding consensus and unity, will be looked back on as a mistake. Experiencing short-term pain, returns the body to unity sooner. By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 21, 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Julian Malakar says: November 24, 2012 at 2:20 pm If you were in my living room right now, I would hug you in gratitude for that post. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel November 21, 2012 at 4:21 pm We need to remember what Jesus taught us about how we should view the Bible. Remember he said “on these two Commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets”. The meaning is clear: if you’re reading the Bible and you’re finding in it excuses to not love one another (respect, treat as equal, honor…), then you’re reading it wrong, and you need to reconsider your actions. Or at least don’t base your disrespect and discrimination on the Bible. Find another excuse. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Karen Fern says: Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY November 21, 2012 at 5:04 pm The bible has been used to justify all sorts of wrongs – from slavery to discrimination to this sort of sexism. And now I see how it’s being used by someone so opposed to the idea of women having anything even anywhere close to equality with men that the mere mention of women’s equality sends that person off running to defend their manly territory. I know women who have far more capability and stability then men, and who have the blessings of God in their work. And if you want to counsel people to leave the church you need to take a hard look at your own relationship first with the church. Maybe everyone would be happier, yourself included, if you left. Rector Smithfield, NC November 21, 2012 at 5:13 pm The decision is not over: the votes of 6 members of the House of Laity will not deter the final decision–which may yet occur even in this Synod. And if not, then certainly by the next Synod. Gynophobia is deeply instilled in our culture and–even when it appears to have been overcome, reappears in other places. “The mills of [God] grind slowly, but they grind exceeding fine.] Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska November 21, 2012 at 11:56 am There is a missing link in the logic of this vote. A decision was made by the Church of England some years ago to ordain women priests. The key word is “ordain”. Once someone is admitted to the priesthood, then the next steps are (and not to minimize them) simply further ordinations. To say to women (or anyone else) well you can get on the first rung or two, but beyond that, forget it. There is no logic to that line of reasoning. Cooler heads will surely wake up and prevail in the Church of England! Rector Knoxville, TN November 22, 2012 at 8:04 pm Anglicanism has always stood the middle ground by being able to live within the tension created by using Tradition, Experience, and Reason in addition to Scripture as a source for its theology. We can cling to sacred cows of tradition despite what two-thousand years of reason and experience have told us about how to interpret Scripture or we can follow the Holy Spirit where it leads the Church to be today. The question I have regarding some of the negative comments above is: Are we called to follow Paul or Christ? Is, in this case, deutero-Paul the authority or is Jesus Christ the one whose teachings even the Pauline writers try to emulate? Because, what I know from the gospels and Acts is that Mary Magdalene, Mary, Martha, and many other women were part of Jesus’ entourage. Mary Magdelene is identified as a disciple which is the office that gave rise to the episcopos. In Acts, we know that Priscilla and Aquilla were missionaries of the gospel and that Lydia was the bishop of a house church. So despite Deutero-Paul’s admonition, which like all the pastoral letters is a letter meant to address a specific issue in a specific place and time, I choose to believe that it is God who calls us to our ministries, and Jesus’ own example of calling people of both sexes is the norm against which I will determine how I read the epistolary. Besides which, Deutero-Paul finds himself in conflict with Paul himself who wrote that “in Chris there is neither Jew nor Greek, Male nor Female…” (emphasis is mine). It is long past time to give up the Medieval Aristotelean view of male being pure and female being defiled. That was a power play on the Church’s part back then, which eliminated female clergy, (there were female clergy up to that point). We have some how enshrined this as dogma. It is not. It is based on unbiblical theology and it is time we called it out for what it is: sexism. Featured Jobs & Calls Linda Gosling says: Jim Lynch says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA JohnCharles says: Simone Kronae says: November 21, 2012 at 10:51 am Perhaps the Episcopal Church needs to do an “extraprovincial intervention” in England, like the churches in Nigeria and Rwanda did to us! An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET November 24, 2012 at 4:37 pm “Glass ceilings, leave the church, the church should die and on and on go the complaints and criticism. Was the vote disappointing? Yes! Was it the end of the church, women’s leadership or the world? No! The struggle for rquality will and must go on and if we believe in God’s time it will come about. Some others of the responders have been so accurate in assessing the great needs facing the Church in the world today. Looking beyond the speck on the window glass to the view out the window we see the ravages of war and disease, hunger, poverty and death. There needs to be a focus on Christ’s call to the Church to serve those who have no voice as well as respecting equality among those who serve. My heart aches for those who have been disappointed by the vote but take heart dear ones. There is another vote coming.Shirley Viall Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Anglican Communion, November 21, 2012 at 3:45 pm When people are dying the Middle East from religious intolerance, starving in Africa, and being murdered in Latin America by drug lords – a chuch with this much passion about women bishops and gay marriage is long past irrelevancy. The Episcopal Church needs to die – and so does the suicidal civilization that spawned it as its final whimper. Nancy Bracey says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 23, 2012 at 5:45 pm I doubt it was the Holy Spirit that was speaking to the Church years ago to ordain women, but most likely it was the spirit of politics or the spirit of the World. The Truth is not hinged to the majority (or minority) vote of the various Houses of the C of E. Katharine Laughton says: Allan Reeder says: Bob Van Keuren says: The Rev. Mary S. Janda says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rev. Prof. H. R. Bronk says: Russ Graham says: Michael McCoy, M.Div. says: Swift reaction follows rejection of women as bishops in England ‘Your church, not mine and not synod’s,’ Canterbury tells women Rector Collierville, TN November 21, 2012 at 1:20 pm The Church of England will find that there are costs to any possible decision, including this one. There were costs when the Episcopal Church first ordained women as priests and later as bishops. But the ordination of women has clearly been what “the Spirit is saying to the Church” for many years, and the Spirit will not stop talking. When women finally serve as bishops in the C of E, they will be as much of a grace and an ornament there as they are in this church. I thank God for the ministry of holy women on all levels in the Episcopal Church, by which I have been blessed again and again and again. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 21, 2012 at 12:08 pm We here in the USA are delighted. Hey, once you let a woman become a bishop, next, you’ll get a woman on the throne of England. November 26, 2012 at 11:49 am Those who believe the Bible need to be updated, please make no mistake to understand that we have been created by God, not accidentally evolved that human being have to be evolved with time and space and change biblical teaching as you think to be right. Source of our life is Christ Himself, not from the universe as many believe. God is eternal and His righteousness for human soul is unchanged.God knows everything about our pros and cons of having free will from 1st couple to our generation and generations to come in future. As such God provided us His righteousness thru The Bible after Resurrection of Christ, knowing all what free will could bring to destroy our souls, in course of time till end of the world. God’s righteousness is same as it was in the beginning, if we see thru His eyes, not thru our bodily eyes. For example, working for good works such as saving a child from a well or healing a blind as Christ did in Sabbath day, did not violet sanctity of Sabbath. Jew Leaders of Christ time knew it very well, but their motive to get Christ be killed was different than glory of God.At present time also, there are many political or Church leaders transformed by socio-cultural changes, try to bring about changes in the Holy Book as needed to fulfill their own interest in course of time rather than glory of God. And that creates conflicts, not the other way around. Earthly 2000 years is nothing to God’s time of infinity. As universal laws like gravitational force is unchanged throughout our universe, omnipotent God’s command is unchanged until Christ comes 2nd time. God gave us the Bible as standard not to sway by wind of contemporary world like now. We get grace by simple faith on the words of the Bible, not by he said/she said. Featured Events Jesse Green says: Jesse Green says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL November 26, 2012 at 8:41 am It humorous to me to listen to all these progressive and humanistic views, I’m so thankful that God does’nt change, and neither does HIS word……………….still love you all….. David E. Pettengill, DD says: Karen Fern says: R.T. Calcote says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags November 21, 2012 at 12:14 pm One wonders at times why we set rules in place for voting and then we disagree with the outcome.If a designated amount of votes are required for action, then the result of the vote is a final decision. Granted, it may not always be our preferred choice. We have been so distracted by matters which do not go along with our way of thinking that perhaps we need to focus more on Christ and spend our time realizing that the desperation of those who are in dire conditions need our attention and our focus in today’s world. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Moputo Jones says: Julian Malakar says: Rector Washington, DC tom blair says: November 23, 2012 at 6:05 pm 95% of the dioceses in the CofE support the ordination of women bishops. And the measure fails in synod after years of endless discussion. Something is both sad and very wrong with this picture. Were all these women ordained to the priesthood – but not quite? In my simple belief system, a priest is a priest. The CofE needs to face a hard truth that none of really like to face. But as individuals, in our lives in the real world, we have to confront the fact that we just can’t have it both ways all the time. In the end, the CofE can’t have it both ways either. Just as we cannot serve God and mammon. 95% of the dioceses. I think the Spirit is speaking clearly to us. If we have the courage to listen. Comments (32) Shirley E. Viall says: Canon Paula Gooder looks on alongside Rowan Williams (R), the outgoing Archbishop of Canterbury, after draft legislation introducing the first women bishops failed to receive final approval from the Church of England General Synod in London. Photo: REUTERS/Yui Mok[Episcopal News Service] Members of the Church of England struggled with their emotions in the hours after its General Synod rejected by six votes a measure to allow women to become bishops.It had been widely assumed that the oft-debated and amended measure — backed by both incoming and outgoing archbishops of Canterbury — would pass Nov. 20 during the second day of the church’s Nov. 19-21 group of sessions at Church House in Westminster. Archbishop of York John Sentamu said after the rejection that the measure would not proceed any further and cannot be considered again until a new synod is elected in 2015, unless a convincing case is presented by the leadership of synod and supported by its members. Details about that process are here.Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, who actively supported passage of the measure, told General Synod on Nov. 21 that the day after the vote “was always going to be a difficult day,” no matter the outcome. “The priority for today for all of us is to attend to one another … that is to give to one another the care that we need, and whatever else we do today, and think today and say today, I hope that that is what we will be able to offer one another,” he said. An audio file of his comments is here.Williams made his remarks after an emergency meeting of the Church of England’s House of Bishops early in the morning Nov. 21 for what he called “an informal discussion,” and he said that the synod leadership also met during the evening of Nov. 20.The archbishop had also commented in a broadcast interview about two hours after the decision, saying that he felt “deep personal sadness” at the outcome.However, he said, the vote “isn’t the end of the story, this is not an issue that is going to go away.”“About three quarters of the total membership of synod voted for this, the dioceses voted for it, there is still the will for this to happen and so what the Church of England now has to do is find a way forward,” Williams said, noting that he understood that “so many people would like to be talking about something else and doing something else.”The archbishop said he understood the “feeling of rejection and unhappiness and deep perhaps disillusion with the institutional church that many women may be feeling” and he urged those women “not to give up.”“It is easy for me to say that, I don’t have to carry it in the same deeply personal way that these women particularly will but I still want to say it is your church, not mine and not synod’s,” he said.The Rev. Rachel Weir, chairwoman of the advocacy group Women and the Church (WATCH), said: “This is a tragic day for the Church of England after so many years of debate and after all our attempts at compromise.”Weir said bishops would need to act promptly to offer pastoral support in the coming weeks to women clergy and others who felt devastated by the decision.The U.K.-based advocacy group Inclusive Church said it “deeply regrets” the decision. “We hope that church leaders will take urgent action to bring forward new legislation and to restore public confidence in the church,” the group said in a statement.Dianna Gwilliams, chair of Inclusive Church said: “I’m personally disappointed … This debate is not about women. It is about the nature of our church and her leadership. I pray that as we continue to listen prayerfully to each other God will grant courage to all women and men who, together, are providing courageous leadership in our church.”But many conservative groups welcomed synod’s decision, which had required a two-thirds majority in each of the three houses of laity, clergy and bishops. The legislation received considerable support from the bishops and clergy, but failed by 6 votes in the House of Laity.Forward in Faith, a traditionalist movement opposed to women’s ordination, said in a statement: “We are not surprised that the legislation failed to command the necessary majorities, as it has been apparent for some time that it lacked any consensus across the whole of the Church of England. As we have done for the last decade and more, Forward in Faith stands ready to offer a better way ahead, which might indeed command that wider consensus which this draft Measure so clearly lacked. We ask now for a period of prayer and reflection on the part of the whole church, following today’s events.”And the Church Society, a group of conservative evangelicals in the Church of England, said it was “reflecting on and praying about” the outcome and would issue a complete statement later. “We are, however, pleased that synod has chosen not to pass the women bishops measure in its current form, which we believe would not have allowed the church to go forward together,” the website posting said.A society member, Zoe Hamm, told BBC Radio Five Live that she and others voted against the measure because they felt that the legislation did not give “proper provision to those of us who hold a biblical view that men and women have to play a different role in the church.” (The interview with Hamm is here beginning at 1:43.)The Rev. Rod Thomas, chair of Reform, a conservative network of individuals and churches within the Church of England, said in a statement: “We thank God that the Church of England has avoided making a big mistake which would have led to real division and a less inclusive church. The synod’s decision shows respect for the issues of conscience involved. It has avoided putting significant minorities who, as faithful Anglicans, seek to follow the Bible’s teaching, into an impossible position. We now have a real opportunity to build on the Church’s solid biblical foundations, reflecting together on the right way forward.”Soon after the vote and ahead of the bishops’ emergency meeting, members of that house issued letters to their dioceses.Bishop of Exeter Michael Langrish wrote that “many, right across the Church of England will … be feeling stunned. The mood among all synod members is subdued.”Rejection of the measure, he said, “will be a cause of disappointment, anxiety and even anger among those who have campaigned hard for this development, and believe it to be of crucial importance for the effective ministry of the church in the service of the gospel,” while for others “the outcome of the vote will be welcome.”“Many on both sides of the argument will look with concern and alarm at the prospect of this subject continuing to consume much time, energy and media attention for many years to come,” Langrish said, asking for prayer and “mutual forbearance” on the part of all diocesan members.The church needs to work hard at producing a new measure that will assure those opposed to female bishops will be  “accounted by the church as fully loyal Anglicans.”Bristol Bishop Mike Hill told his diocese that the rejection of the measure was “disastrous.”“It will be very difficult for those of us who have supported the ordination of women bishops to process our disappointment in the days ahead,” he wrote. “My prayers are with the many people who are hurting, particularly women in our churches and those within and outside the church who are bemused and disillusioned by such a failure.”Hill said he was amazed at the vote, given the agreement in principle to female bishops for years, including the fact that 42 of the 44 diocesan synods throughout England approved the legislation supporting female bishops.“In a culture that celebrates democracy, it does seem strange that a clear minority has managed to influence the debate and elected representatives in such a way,” Hill wrote. “However, we will have to come to terms with where we now are and somehow learn to live together with the serious ramifications this failure to move forward creates.”Diocese of Lincoln Bishop Christopher Lowson raised a concern voiced by many when he said “the proposal had the overwhelming support of most of the diocesan synods, and this raises very serious questions about the representation of General Synod, and calls for a broad review of how General Synod members are elected.”Lowson said the Church of England “suffered a serious credibility problem while it worked on the legislation, and this is a set-back that could cement the church’s reputation as being outdated and out-of-touch.”Meanwhile, the Catholic Group in General Synod, which said before synod convened that it did not believe that it was “appropriate” for the Church of England to allow women to become bishops, called after the vote for “mediation and conciliation … so that new legislation can be framed to provide fairly for all members of the Church of England.”According to a report by the BBC, the group said the measure failed because “because it was unclear and unfair in its provision for those who, in conscience, are unable to accept the ministry of women as bishops or priests.” The group called for the House of Bishops to reconvene talks that began in the summer among different groups, chaired by Bishop of Durham Justin Welby, who will become archbishop of Canterbury in March 2013.The group’s claim that the measure was not clear was echoed by Bishop of Pontefract Tony Robinson (a bishop suffragan in the Diocese of Wakefield) and Bishop of Plymouth John Ford. The rejection “uncovered a stubborn unease, particularly among lay people, about the measure that was presented,” they said in a statement posted on the Forward in Faith UK website. The statement said it was issued on behalf of the bishops of the Society of St Wilfrid and St. Hilda.“Acutely aware of the profound anguish that will now be felt by so many, we believe that it is wise at this point to refrain from analysis of the past or speculation about what the future might hold,” they wrote. “These are testing times for the Church of England. We pray that we who, between us, have held different opinions on this great matter will be able to find in each other the wisdom and humility we shall need to build a common future.”The Twitter-sphere was ablaze immediately after the decision as subscribers to that social media outlet expressed their opinions in bursts of 140 characters or less. Many used the #synodfail hashtag to label their views.“I have never felt less represented by synod,” tweeted the Rev. Caroline Symcox, who identifies herself as a second-year curate of a Buckinghamshire parish.Another Church of England priest, the Rev. Rachel Mann, acknowledged the scope of the issue in her tweet, which appeared to have been the first to include #synodfail. “I am genuinely shattered,” she wrote. “Yes, there are more pressing issues in the world tonight – Gaza and so on – but that’s awful.”Hannah, who identifies herself as an Exeter theology undergrad and Ottawa exchange student, tweeted: “I don’t want to be part of this church anymore.”Chris Bryant, Labour Member of Parliament for Rhondda, tweeted that “I fear the CofE as a national church died today. And many of my friends’ hearts will have broken.”In the United States, the Rev. Susan Russell, senior associate at All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California, said in an e-mailed comment that the Church of England “confused ‘unity’ with ‘unison.’”“The victims in this sad, fear-based decision are not the women whose vocations have once again been reduced to bargaining chips in a game of church politics or even the conservatives who feel marginalized because of their increasingly minority position,” she wrote. “The real victims are the tender souls yearning for spiritual community and for the good news of the gospel and hearing instead from the church yet another reason not to be a Christian.”“And for all the challenges we face as the Episcopal Church, I have never been more grateful to be an Anglican on this side of the pond,” she added.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg and Matthew Davies are editors/reporters for the Episcopal News Service. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anne Million says: November 21, 2012 at 10:56 pm If we listen to the words of Jesus, “Father forgive them”, and we learn from the Bible about the wrestling of mankind with the reality of God, and we don’t worship the Bible, by providing an exactitude that is not there, we will relate in love to our fellow children of God. This process should provide for an environment for turning toward the inspiration and communication from God instead of worshiping the words that represent the understanding of people almost 2000 years ago. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

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20 Jun
2021

Conrad Selnick named vice president at Bexley Seabury Seminary

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Theological Education Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments (1) Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Nov 13, 2013 Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Susan Zimmerman says: November 13, 2013 at 7:15 pm Did his father teach at Seabury also??? Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT People, Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Bexley Seabury Seminary Federation] Bexley Seabury Seminary Federation President Roger A. Ferlo announced on November 12 that the Rev. T. Conrad Selnick will become the federation’s vice president for advancement and church relations in January 2014. Selnick is currently rector of St. Christopher’s by the River Episcopal Church in Gates Mills, Ohio in the Diocese of Ohio.“We are building a center for Episcopal learning and discipleship at the crossroads of the country, and I am delighted that Conrad will join us,” said Ferlo. “His experience as a rector, a consultant and a leader in the wider church is the perfect fit for our mission.”As vice president, Selnick will support Ferlo in soliciting major gifts to support the seminary’s mission. He will also lead the federation’s alumni relations efforts, direct the annual fund and initiate and expand a planned giving program. “Bexley Hall and Seabury Western faced hard realities and made some faithful, courageous choices,” said Selnick. “The Federation’s board is venturing, eyes wide open, into theological education in the 21st century. Instead of repairing leaking roofs, they are taking the creative route, a blue-sky journey. I find that exciting, and I am looking forward to being a part of it.”Selnick, who holds a bachelor’s degree from Johns Hopkins, a master of divinity from Episcopal Divinity School and a master’s degree in organizational development and analysis from the Weatherhead School of Business at Case Western Reserve University, was ordained in the Diocese of Southern Ohio and has served since 1990 in the Diocese of Ohio. He has been rector of two parishes and served in congregational ministry in several other roles. A licensed chemical dependency counselor, Selnick has worked as a clinical therapist and as an organizational consultant in secular settings.“I am grateful to Conrad for his many years of faithful service to the church in Ohio, and I am glad that he has agreed to continue that service at Bexley Seabury,” said the Rt. Rev. Mark Hollingsworth Jr., bishop of Ohio and a Bexley Seabury trustee. “The Federation forms leaders to proclaim God’s mission in the 21st century, and I know that Conrad will contribute faithfully and well to that work.”Selnick will be based at Seabury Western, located in the headquarters of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) in Chicago, and also spend significant time at the Bexley campus in Columbus, where he began his ministry more than 25 years ago. He is married to the Rev. Elizabeth Eaton, who is the presiding bishop of the ELCA. They are the parents of two adult children: Rebeckah, who is married to Michael Ray, and Susannah. Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Conrad Selnick named vice president at Bexley Seabury Seminary Tags Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

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20 Jun
2021

Girls in School; Girls with Dignity: commitment during 16 Days,…

first_img Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Girls in School; Girls with Dignity: commitment during 16 Days, beyond Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Posted Nov 25, 2015 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Anglican Communion News Service] For the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence, we have joined together as a faith-based coalition to focus on ending violence against girls and young women in education, confident that all activism promoting equal and respectful relationship is good news, all year round, wherever and whoever we are.The 16 Days begin on Nov. 25, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women and end on Dec. 10, Human Rights Day.Education provides the foundation for girls’ development on their journey toward adult life. It plays a vital role in helping women realize their potential economically, politically and socially.But school is often not a safe place for a girl.Girls in SchoolFor girls around the world, exercising their right to education can be full of risk. They are at risk from violence on the journey to and from school and in the classroom itself. This violence may take the form of aggressive sexual behaviour, intimidation and physical assault by boys, sexual advances by male students and teachers, corporal punishment and verbal abuse.In most parts of the world, our religious institutions are major contributors to education, providing schools, colleges, universities and theological seminaries. Our sacred texts and faith traditions give us stories that empower and give voice to women and girls. We have myriad opportunities to teach and embed values that recognize and promote the equal dignity of girls and boys, young women and young men.Our schools and all our educational institutions can practice zero tolerance of sexual and gender-based violence and teach young women and men the full meaning of sexual and reproductive rights. We can work with families and wider communities to ensure that girls can complete their education, and are safe as they travel to and from school.Girls out of SchoolEvery girl has an inherent dignity as God’s creation. Making sure that every girl has access to education honors that dignity. Yet in spite of promises made to children in many international conventions and national constitutions, one in five adolescents and one in 11 primary school-aged children are excluded from the classroom. Fifteen million girls are unlikely to set foot inside a classroom (UIS/UNICEF 2015). Girls who miss out on education or who leave school too soon are less likely to develop themselves and their families and communities. They are less likely to have any say in what happens to their lives and their bodies. They are more likely to live in poverty, be trafficked and prostituted, be exposed to HIV and sexually transmitted infections, be coerced into early marriage, have pregnancies at an early age, and to die or suffer serious physical injury during childbirth.Faith leaders and the whole faith community have a vital role to play in advocating for compliance of the universal right to education and for national policy – adequately resourced – for the prevention and elimination of violence against girls in school. The new Sustainable Development Goals 4 (Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning) and 5 (Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls) provide fresh impetus for this.Thursdays in BlackJoin us as we link with a growing global movement of women and men who lament violence against women and girls and show their solidarity and commitment to ending it by wearing black every Thursday. The Thursdays in Black website links to information and tools to help us, including resources on girls’ safety in and out of school.We are using each of the three Thursdays during the 16 Days:to gather sacred narratives from the Christian and Islamic traditions that empower and give voice to girls and womento tell the stories of initiatives by our faith institutions or faith-based organisations to end violence against girls and womento promote a prayer of lament and confession and a prayer of blessing relating to the girl child.Ending Early and Forced MarriageWe recognize the connection between early and forced marriage and the lack of access to education for girls. We seek to interact with faith leaders and schools both in Muslim and Christian contexts with a view to providing safe spaces for girls and support for families faced with the economic necessity and/or the tradition of marrying their daughters at an early age. The role that faith leaders and religious belief can play in raising awareness and protecting girls is at the core of our initiative. This will be reflected in a series of short videos, stories of local initiatives, and other resources that can be downloaded here.NoXcusesThe NoXcuses campaign gives an additional faith dimension to discussions around violence against women. Testimonies have been gathered from Church leaders that reflect both the negative and positive roles that the Church plays in addressing violence. Click here for the NoXcuses website and advocacy toolkit.See here for many other resources and updates throughout the 16 Days.Anglican Communion, Church of Sweden, Finn Church Aid, Islamic Relief Worldwide, Lutheran World Federation, Mission 21, World Communion of Reformed Churches, World Council of Churches, World Young Christian Women’s Association (YWCA) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA For more information can contact the Rev. Terrie Robinson, Anglican Communion’s director for Women in Church and Society. Gender Justice Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

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20 Jun
2021

July 12 dispatches from 79th General Convention in Austin

first_imgJuly 12 dispatches from 79th General Convention in Austin Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Lloyd Newell says: Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA General Convention 2018 Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 12, 2018 at 7:36 pm Is it just me or does more happen behind the dark ? Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Posted Jul 12, 2018 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] Much happens each day during General Convention. To complement Episcopal News Service’s primary coverage, we have collected some additional news items from July 12.Sisters in both housesDeputy Jeanine Baunsgard (left) and Bishop Gretchen Rehberg are the first sisters to serve both houses at the same time at a General Convention. The 79th General Convention has many family connections, with fathers and sons, mothers and daughters and other familial combinations represented.For the first time at general convention two sisters – not in-laws, not nuns or religious – are serving in both houses and from the same diocese. Deputy Jeanine Baunsgard represents the Diocese of Spokane in the House of Deputies, and her sister, Bishop Gretchen Rehberg, also from Spokane, serves in the House of Bishops. There is a long family tradition at General Convention for the Rehbergs. The sisters’ father, Wallace, was a deputy from 1976 through 1991, then their mother, Margaret, served in the HOD from 1994 through 2003.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.Gretchen served in the HOD as a clergy deputy in 2009 and 2012. She was ordained a bishop in March 2017, moving to the House of Bishops for the 2018 General Convention. Jeanine carries on the nearly 15-convention family tradition with her second turn as a deputy, 2015 and 2018.“I am honored and blessed to be a deputy for Spokane. As I look around the house [of Deputies] and listen to the songs and debate, I feel dad and mom’s presence, and I feel that I am honoring them. Although the process has changed dramatically with new technology, the same Holy Spirit is with us,” said Jeanine.Wallace died in 2005, and the family did not serve in the 2006 General Convention. Gretchen said that her mother has attended Episcopal Church Women Triennial Meetings and other events related to General Convention since being a deputy, but this year is home taking care of the bishop’s dog.“Jeanine and I know we are the first sisters [to serve both houses at the same time] because there just are not that many women bishops,” Gretchen said.– Sharon Tillman‘Everything is going OK’ despite record number of resolutionsThe 79th General Convention is moving through a record 502 resolutions, but House of Deputies Parliamentarian Bryan Krislock told his colleagues at the opening of the morning legislative session July 12 that “everything is going OK.”“We have every expectation that we will complete our business before the close of convention tomorrow and have enough time to discuss the very serious issues and resolutions that are before this house,” Krislock said.Convention is scheduled to adjourn at 6:30 p.m. CT on July 13.Krislock said that “most of the time” in the sessions has been spent dealing with procedural issues, points of order and parliamentary inquiries rather than actual debate on resolutions. He projected a graph on the large screens in the house to illustrate his point.House of Deputies Parliamentarian Bryan Krislock offers a visual explanation July 12 of how to consider the efficiency of debate. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“Once the debate starts, it really moves rather smoothly,” he said.Meanwhile, the House of Bishops spent the first 90 minutes of the two-and-a-half-hour morning legislative session completing its legislative calendar and then was waiting on resolutions from the deputies.If the pace in the House of Deputies slows down too much, Krislock said, the parliamentarians and the house’s committee on dispatch, which manages the flow of resolutions to the floor, will present a plan to the deputies for picking up the pace.In a related move, House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings told the house just after Krislock finished his remarks that she was limiting committee reports on legislation to three minutes.– Mary Frances SchjonbergBishop Eugene Sutton of Maryland receives the “Olympic torch” passed to him by the bishops of Texas on July 12. The Texas bishops presented the torch to the Maryland bishops in recognition that the 80th General Convention will be held in Baltimore in 2021. Photo: Mike Patterson/Episcopal News ServiceGoFundMe site created to raise money for Cuban clergy pensionsIn her testimony delivered during the House of Bishops’ July 10 legislative session, when bishops voted unanimously to admit the Episcopal Church of Cuba as a diocese, former Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori pointed out that if each Episcopalian gave 50 cents, the church could fund the gap in Cuba’s pension plan. Utah Bishop Scott B. Hayashi responded saying he would up it to $1 for every person in his diocese.Since then, the Rev. Nic Mather, an associate at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Spokane, Washington, created a GoFundMe page with a goal of raising $5,000 to fund pensions for the Cuban clergy, who’ve forgone both institutional and governmental pensions to serve the church.You can donate to the fund here.– Lynette WilsonBishops approve task force to examine theology of money in Episcopal ChurchEpiscopal bishops, meeting during the 79th General Convention, approved a resolution that would lead to the creation of a task force to examine the theology money in the Episcopal Church. Resolution A061 directs the presiding bishop and president of the House of Deputies to form the Task Force on the Church’s Theology of Money and report its findings and recommendations in three years to the 80th General Convention.The task force would use “scripture, approved liturgical resources, other theological texts and previous actions of General Convention to summarize the ways in which the Episcopal Church understands the theology of money and financial resources in the way we give, invest and spend.”The resolution directs the task force to examine elements of responsible investing that are consistent with the church’s faith and mission, including applying ethical guidelines in investment selection and management, shareholder activism and investing for responsible social and environmental outcomes as well as financial return.– Mike PattersonAfter-dark legislative sessions not instant hits at conventionBoth houses of the 79th General Convention met in rare evening-into-night sessions on July 11. With 501 resolutions pending at one point, the presiding officers decided that bishops and deputies had some work to do.The Episcopal Church knows how to light up the night: parliamentary and legislative work in both Houses until 9:30 p.m. #gcafterdark— kelligrace (@kelligrace) July 12, 2018The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, announced at the start of that house’s session that there was a hashtag for the two hours ahead: #GCAfterDark.Deputies then spent the first 30 minutes not passing any resolutions.https://twitter.com/FrJody/status/1017211164764393472They eventually got down to business and passed six resolutions.Most of the resolutions were accompanied by impassioned, if short, pleas for passage.https://twitter.com/ATXScott/status/1017224843425611777The after-dark sessions apparently disturbed the resident and visiting pigeons in the deputies’ hall.https://twitter.com/diocesecpa/status/1017211405999771649I think #gcafterdark is cramping the style of @gc79pigeon #gc79pigeonafterdark. #gc79 #pigeonsneedaprivatelifetoo pic.twitter.com/nQIxrujbXC— Kelley Hudlow (@akhudlow) July 12, 2018However, General Convention Pigeon was OK with it all.Ain’t no party like a house of deputies night party because a house of deputies night party is… MANDATORY. #withapologiestolizlemon https://t.co/br2TRmHZGD— General Convention Pigeon (@gc79pigeon) July 12, 2018Loyalties to the pigeons’ status as Beloved of Deputies were challenged at one point.The official animal of the #HoD #gc79 #GCAfterDark pic.twitter.com/ceGS5Updit— Fr. Paul H. Castelli, AF (@PaulHCastelli) July 12, 2018Upstairs in the House of Bishops, the word “punchy” could be heard being murmured around the floor.As the bishops reached the end of their legislative calendar of a handful of resolutions about 9 p.m. and were getting ready for closing prayers, there was a lightness and palpable relief in the room.Meanwhile, back downstairs in deputies, tweeting was going strong.The Diocese of Oklahoma decided that it could at least achieve some efficiency in meal planning by visiting the famous and increasingly craved output from nearby Voodoo Donuts.https://twitter.com/kate_huston/status/1017211892543127552And then, at 9:30 p.m., the deputies called it a night.https://twitter.com/AMcKellar17/status/1017233793676185602– Mary Frances Schjonberg Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Comments (1) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET General Convention, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

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20 Jun
2021

Cuban church celebrates 110 years, its final synod before Episcopal…

first_img Rector Bath, NC By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 8, 2019 Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cuba, Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Latin America New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Cuban church celebrates 110 years, its final synod before Episcopal Church reintegration TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church of Cuba clergy and guests gather with Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio outside Holy Trinity Cathedral in Havana following the March 3 closing Eucharist of the 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Havana, Cuba] The Episcopal Church of Cuba recently celebrated its 110-year history during its final synod as an autonomous diocese in anticipation of its official reintegration with the U.S.-based Episcopal Church in 2020.“For 50 years the Episcopal Church has been isolated,” said Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio, at the close of the Feb. 28-March 3 General Synod held at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Havana. Reintegration, she said, “is a way to be part of a big family.”Delgado’s strong leadership drove the reintegration, said Archbishop Fred Hiltz of the Anglican Church of Canada, who serves as chair of the Metropolitan Council of Cuba. The council has overseen the Cuban church since its separation from The Episcopal Church in the late 1960s.Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio and Archbishop Fred Hiltz of the Anglican Church of Canada stand outside Holy Trinity Cathedral in Havana, following the opening Eucharist of the 110th General Synod on Feb. 28. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“I mean every word when I say, she’s a visionary, she’s a hard worker,” said Hiltz, in an interview with Episcopal News Service. “She will do anything to promote the interest, well-being and resource capacity to support the ministry of this church. She’s steadfast, she perseveres, and it’s not always been easy for her.“Not everybody was thrilled with the idea of returning to The Episcopal Church, but she just plodded along consistently, she’s worked with the clergy, the laity. I watched her prepare for the special synod last year to decide what province they would belong to, and just the careful way she made sure there was conversation all the way across the church here in Cuba. They came into the synod with the decision, and that’s a huge credit to her style – organized and focused, spiritually centered leadership.”The Diocese of Cuba is set to join Province II, which includes dioceses from New York and New Jersey in the United States, the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, Haiti and the Virgin Islands.The Cuban church’s reintegration with The Episcopal Church was one of many topics discussed during the synod, which brought together clergy and laity from across the island.“We are indeed so happy to welcome the church in Cuba back into The Episcopal Church; there is so much that we can learn from their creative approach to ministry and mission,” said the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church.The House of Bishops on July 10, 2018, voted unanimously to readmit the Cuban church as a diocese, with the House Deputies concurring. The actions of the 79th General Convention accelerated the reintegration process first set in motion four years ago.Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio leads the recessional following the Feb. 28 Eucharist opening the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIn March 2015, two months after the United States and Cuba agreed to reestablish diplomatic relations following a 54-year breach, the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s synod voted 39 to 33 in favor of returning to the church’s former affiliation with The Episcopal Church. That summer, the 78th General Convention called for closer relations with the Cuban church and a lifting of the decades-long U.S. economic embargo against Cuba.The Rev. John Kafwanka, the Anglican Communion’s director for mission, gives a presentation about the importance of training Christians for ministry in their everyday lives. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Episcopal Church of Cuba traces its origins back to an Anglican presence that began on the island in 1871. In 1901, it became a missionary district of The Episcopal Church. The two churches separated in the 1960s, after Fidel Castro seized power following the 1959 Cuban Revolution and diplomatic relations between the two countries disintegrated. The Episcopal Church of Cuba has functioned as an autonomous diocese of the Anglican Communion under the authority of the Metropolitan Council of Cuba since the separation in 1967. The primates of the Anglican churches of Canada and the West Indies and The Episcopal Church chair the Metropolitan Council.The synod marked the final time Hiltz, who has served as the chair of the Metropolitan Council for 12 years and is set to retire later this year, would attend.“It’s a bit emotional for me, this synod. It is my last synod here as the primate of Canada and the chair of the Metropolitan Council,” he said.“It’s mixed emotions – great joy that things have come thus far. I would have felt really awkward ending my time as the chair of the Metropolitan Council if things hadn’t been as far along in terms of the reintegration,” said Hiltz. “It’s been just really wonderful to watch that process unfold since 2015. I’m really happy to see it coming to fruition and to think that at next year’s synod, their presiding bishop will be here because they have sometimes spoken of me as their primate. And I guess for all intents and purposes I have been.”Pending alignment of the Cuban and the U.S.-based Episcopal Church’s constitutions and canons and signoff from the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, next March, the Diocese of Cuba will hold its first convention along with a celebration and visit from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.The Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church, gave a presentation on March 2 about next steps in the process of reintegration during the 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“We are deeply thankful to Archbishop Hiltz, to the Metropolitan Council (of Cuba) and the Anglican Church of Canada for their years of faithful partnership and support to the church in Cuba,” said Robertson.Delgado was installed in November 2010. Prior to that, Bishop Miguel Tamayo of the Anglican Church of Uruguay served the church as an interim bishop for six years, splitting his time between Montevideo and Havana. Bishops from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic have also served in that role; both Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are Episcopal Church dioceses in Province IX.On Feb. 27, The Episcopal Church announced a campaign to raise pension funds for retired and active clergy in the Episcopal Church of Cuba. The average priest’s salary in Cuba is $55 per month; the Cuban government doesn’t recognize religious employment, rendering clergy ineligible for state pensions or social security. Over the last 50 years, clergy have had to forgo pensions. The establishment of a pension system provides some security to clergy who can now rely on the church into old age, said Delgado.The Cuban church has 23 clergy members serving 10,000 Episcopalians in 46 congregations and missions across the island. At the time of the official announcement, The Episcopal Church already had raised more than half of the targeted one-time amount of $800,000. The money, to be managed by the Church Pension Fund, makes up for the absence of contributions during the separation and addresses an injustice.“This is part of the work of reconciliation, bringing us together across historic divides. This is not just fundraising; it’s following Jesus and finding our way back to each other,” said Curry, in a press release.During the church’s February Executive Council meeting, Curry referred to the pensions campaign and the Church of Cuba’s return to The Episcopal Church as an act of “reconciliation no matter what our governments do.” The Obama administration attempted to open relations between the U.S. and Cuban governments; before President Donald Trump’s election, travel restrictions imposed on American citizens were relaxed. In 2017, Trump restored the restrictions.– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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