26 Jan
2021

Professors receive fellowships

first_imgTwo Notre Dame professors recently received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to pursue their scholarly work next year, increasing the University’s record number of NEH fellowships to 44 in the last 12 years. Notre Dame has earned more NEH fellowships since 1999 than any other university in the country, according to a University press release. The University of Michigan earned 35 NEH fellowships and Harvard earned 26. Notre Dame theology professor Eugene Ulrich received a fellowship this year in Ancient Languages to pursue his book, “The Bible in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls,” a compilation of his previous work on the topic. “The Dead Sea Scrolls … open up a period that we had lost sight of, a period that had just been lost to history,” Ulrich said. “Which is part of the period of the composition of the Scriptures.” Ulrich’s career has been focused on exploring this era through the scrolls, and therefore gaining a greater appreciation for and understanding of the Biblical texts. His work began as a graduate student at Harvard under Frank Cross, one of the two original American editors of the Dead Sea Scrolls. His dissertation became an analysis of one of the major scrolls. “It was being in the right place at the right time,” Ulrich said. Ulrich’s first NEH fellowship in 1977 enabled him to publish one of the scrolls, leading to a lifetime of research pertaining to these documents. When the other editor, Monsignor Patrick Skehan of Catholic University of America, died, he left his life’s work to Ulrich because he was so impressed with his research. “This coming year will be my 39th year of teaching here,” Ulrich said, “and 21 of those years, I have had NEH funding. They were very interested in the publication of the scrolls.” Ulrich’s upcoming work expands on a book he published last year, “The Biblical Qumran Scrolls: Transcriptions and Textual Variants,” which includes all of the text from the Biblical Scrolls, but makes it more accessible. “After going through scroll after scroll after scroll and seeing different surprises here, different surprises there, what I’m doing now is synthesizing all that and putting it into one monograph so that you can get in one book a clear explanation and description of how the Bible came to be the way it is,” Ulrich said. Thomas F. X. Noble, chair of Notre Dame’s History Department, received an NEH fellowship in Medieval Studies to produce his book “Rome in the Medieval Imagination,” a look at how Rome was perceived by different people and cultures during Medieval times. “Everyone had an opinion about Rome,” Noble said. “Good, bad or indifferent.” Noble’s previous work focused on Rome itself, especially Popes and the Roman Church. His new book, however, will explore Rome through the eyes of Medieval citizens. “Rome was a constant presence for Medieval people,” Noble said “It haunted their imagination, and [in my book] I am poking around inside people’s imagination a thousand years ago.” Noble said “Rome in the Medieval Imagination” will finally provide a source for Medieval scholars to learn about their subjects’ perceptions of Rome. “Whoever studies Medieval art, literature or history runs into Rome all the time,” Noble said. “Some people might be thinking why this author in 12th century France thought this about Rome … and they’ve never had a book to take off the shelf to look that up and find out. So what I’m trying to do is explain why you bump into Rome all the time if you study the Middle Ages.” This is Noble’s third NEH fellowship, but he said he still feels just as great about it as his first two. “When you win one of these awards, it means that an anonymous panel of our peers thought well of what we’re doing,” Noble said. “When the NEH looks at all those worthy applications and picks yours, it feels pretty good. Notre Dame has a wonderful tradition in winning these so it’s nice to be part of that group.”last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

The Glee Project’ contestant speaks about true beauty

first_imgThe cast of The Glee Project presented True Beauty at the Carroll Auditorium in Saint Mary’s Madeleva Hall last night. Members of the show discussed their definition of beauty and self esteem as a part of Love Your Body Week. The Glee Project’s contender, Hannah McIalwain, said the True Beauty Program promotes confidence in women’s self-image. “Everyone is going to struggle with some insecurity, but come back to yourself and say, ‘Yes, I am good enough,’” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she struggled with self-image in her younger years but gained confidence before entering high school. She said she became active in school plays and felt happier. When her parents divorced during her junior year, she ate for comfort, McIalwain said. “I felt alone and I continued to gain pounds. This was a low point,” she said. “I had no one else who knew the real me and I portrayed myself as happy and bubbly.” In her senior year, auditions for MTV’s Made arrived at her high school, she said. McIalwain auditioned and landed a spot. The show changed her life, she said. “I went for everything in the show. I turned around and I felt beautiful and confident,” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she attended college at Queens University with a fresh perspective. Though a heartbreak set her back, McIalwain decided to audition for The Glee Project as well. She was chosen to be in the show with eleven other contenders. “This gave me more self-confidence than before, but I still felt like I was not good enough, but each week I kept growing,” McIalwain said. “Eventually, I gained a strong self-confidence out of the show.” The most difficult task in The Glee Project was the week of vulnerability, she said. Contenders wrote their insecurities on a white board and held their sign in front of strangers. “My insecurity was simply, fat. I felt embarrassed before the cameras were on and broke down,” McIalwain said. ” But … It does not define me; it does not matter.” McIalwain said she remained in Los Angeles for two months after the show ended for auditions, but no jobs were offered. She left Hollywood and moved back home with her mother. “I felt like I was being left behind,” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she worked minimum wage jobs until she had enough money to move back to Los Angeles. She is currently looking for more opportunities there, she said. “You have to keep going. All of us are beautiful and perfect,” McIalwain said. Through the True Beauty Project, McIalwain speaks to women about the influence the media, peers and parents have on the definition of beauty. “You have to know your confidence. You have to realize what is beautiful and redefine what beauty is,” McIalwain said.last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Lecture explores oral culture in digital age

first_imgWilliam Butler Yeats and Federico García Lorca may have been writing 100 years ago, but English PhD candidate John Dillon suggests their works from near the turn of the 20th century reflect a moment of change similar to today’s cultural upheaval.Dillon, the Notebaert Graduate Presidential Fellow in the Department of English, delivered a lecture Friday titled “From Oral Culture to Open Access: Yeats, Lorca and the Digital Turn.” He argued that the current digital or information revolution mirrors the Industrial Revolution that catalyzed European Modernism at the turn of the 20th century, and that by examining the work of writers like Yeats and Lorca today’s readers can better understand the current cultural climate.Explaining the fascination the writers had for the folklore of their respective Irish and Spanish cultures, Dillon said both were immersed in folk culture and for them, the artistic event of a folk tale was far more remarkable than written word.“If folklore, as Yeats and Lorca would insist, is not what is kept in the archive but in the heart, then one should reconsider their engagement with folklore based on how they encountered it rather than what they collected,” he said.Dillon said Lorca especially was “highly suspicious of the written word” and had a deep commitment to creating a “living art” as “alive and pulsing as a frog.”Because of Lorca’s upbringing in southern Spain, Dillon said the poet was immersed in the rural, folkloric culture throughout his early life.“For Lorca, any sort of cosmopolitanism is completely a second language,” he said. “Growing up in Fuente Vaqueros, a folk way of life would have been as natural as the ground beneath his feet.”Lorca’s early works, notably “Poema del cante jondo” and “Romancero gitano” reflect this deep-rooted identification with Spanish folklore, Dillon said. Similarly, Yeats’ understanding of the organic nature of art allowed him to think of literature as an activity or a game being played, he said. Because of this, Yeats created a “potent” and “ephemeral” art.“This is a living art; it’s stitched into life,” Dillon said. “This is perhaps the critical characteristic of the art … in this way, the awareness that what one is doing is art flickers in and out, which makes it spontaneous, organic and undefinable.”The intersection of folk culture and European Modernism in Yeats’ and Lorca’s writing is important because it affects the way today’s scholars view literature, he said.“If the aesthetic catalyst at the beginning of the 20th century was the Industrial Revolution, then the digital or information revolution bookends this century,” Dillon said. “We can hold up the former as a foothold for perspective to see the latter.“It seems to me that with the digital turn … we are moving towards a form of art which is quite like the type of living art I have been describing. It’s strange; we are moving forward in time but we’re aesthetically regressing.”Dillon said the digital revolution creates a type of “gold rush,” where people anxiously attempt to preserve and archive today’s culture.“We have to digitize everything. Everything must be in an archive,” he said. “We are the contemporary folklorists… [and] this rush of anxiety parallels the development of new tools for recording and preservation.“More can be recorded, so more must be recorded. We also see an obsession with metadata, taxonomy and classification.”In the midst of a moment of cultural change, Dillon said both writers and readers must resist the marketability of art and remember that content is not created for the market.last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Saint Mary’s panel discusses Ferguson aftermath

first_imgA panel discussion Tuesday at Saint Mary’s titled “Understanding Ferguson and its Aftermath” explored the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., and used the incident as a starting point for interdisciplinary dialogue among faculty and students, panelist and professor of communication studies Helen Ho said.“The Ferguson story has become such an enormous and ongoing contentious narrative in the last few months, and it’s something that sets the backdrop for our return to campus, a place for critical discussion and thoughtful deliberation,” Ho said. “Panels like this help can help to provide a space for conversation, as well as a contextualization and synthesis of ideas for those who have been following, or trying to follow, the events.”Cristina Russo | The Observer The panel also included Jamie Wagman, assistant professor of history and gender and women’s studies, and Stacy Davis, associate professor of religious studies and chair of the department of gender and women’s studies. Senior humanistic studies major Clare Maher also participated, panel coordinator and assistant professor of English Ann Marie Alfonso-Forero said.“During the weeks that followed [the shooting of Michael Brown], there was a lot of news coverage of the event and the community grieved … while the police in Ferguson responded to it with tanks and tear gas,” Alfonso-Forero said. “We were talking about how we might address this issue with our students, and we’d feel remiss if we didn’t address this in some way.”The purpose of the panel was to discuss the historical and social contexts of the shooting, the militarization of police in Ferguson and the ongoing protests demanding justice, Wagman said.“We know there was a confrontation between an armed police officer and an unarmed teenager,” she said. “… The community responded with protests. The protest pride became ‘Hands up, don’t shoot.’ Other towns, cities and college campuses held rallies for peace and justice. At times, the media has questioned Brown’s character.”Maher said the increased role of social media in telling and spreading stories like those from Ferguson highlight her generation’s reluctance to use social media as a truly reliable informing medium. She encouraged the audience to use social media for more substantive discussions using credible sources.“In the age of social media, we don’t research why, and context is not something we value,” she said. “Headlines are often the only way we read a newspaper. Social media is not meant to be comprehensive, it’s meant to be social.“Our society is increasingly underinformed. The picture we get from the news media is uninformed. Declaring our personal stance in social media seems significant, [but] you should be moved to look at more than just a Buzzfeed article. Change the narrative, find context. Publish articles in your status.”Davis addressed the subject of militarization, particularly armed police militarization and the perceptions of police in African-American communities.“One of the things that folks have been protesting about in Ferguson is what they have called the militarization of the police force, the use of armored cars,” Davis said. “The police have acted like the military.”“My hope is that what is happening in Ferguson will once again start a conversation about the relationship between law enforcement and civilians,” she said. “At least in black communities, this is just one more unarmed black kid. The hope for us and for anybody is, can we reach a point where these things do not happen? Most of the folks in Ferguson just want to know what happened to one of their own.”Ho said the American public should question why it grows indifferent to these types of tragedies and how the stories are portrayed in the media.“Part of the way some media outlets are discussing this story is that ‘tragedies like this occur all the time,’ and Brown’s death shouldn’t be made a big deal,” she said. “This reaction downplays the real emotions and histories felt by various populations and communities and the real lived experiences that some of us cannot and will not ever be able to fully comprehend.”Beyond media treatment of the story, Ho said Americans should realize the role of government officials in the incident and inform themselves about the deep-seeded issues behind the incident.“We should, as citizens in a democracy, have a right to hold our elected officials accountable and have a say in how we are protected, and by whom,” Ho said. “… It’s easy for outsiders, professional reporters, politicians and others to say things should be fine in a place like Ferguson. But, those who have talked to the residents of Ferguson find a different story, a story about a community whose lived experience is very different.“The fact that this story has resonated for so many around the country illustrates that these feelings and experiences resonate beyond Ferguson. This shared sense of, ‘here we go again,’ is something people should be using to come together to discuss larger contexts of race, representation, media narratives and social justice.” Tags: Ferguson, panel, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Congressman promotes pro-life perspective

first_imgRep. Mike McIntyre, D-N.C.,  gave a lecture entitled “A Reflection on the Importance of Faith and Prayer in Shaping National Policies” in Mendoza on Friday as part of ND Right to Life’s Pro-Life Respect Week.McIntyre, a pro-life Democrat and member of the bipartisan congressional pro-life caucus, spoke about his faith’s role in inspiring him to pursue issues in politics, specifically the decision between life and choice regarding abortion.“I know that during the 18 years I’ve spent in Congress, I’ve always thought it was important to honor and respect the opportunities the good Lord gives us,” he said. “When I, in Congress, try to make sure that we’re doing the right thing with regard to pro-life issues, it’s something which we take very seriously as part as our faith and as well as part of our concern and our constitutional responsibility.”McIntyre said he believes the influence of faith can help bring people together to solidarity on these divisive and controversial issues.“When we talk about a variety of backgrounds, the question is how important is your faith to affect what you do,” he said. “We want to make sure that as long you’re on a Catholic campus or a Protestant campus or a private campus or a public campus … do we have to know there is a void between our faith and the public marketplace of ideas, and the answer to that is compellingly, profoundly absolutely not. There should be no void and in fact that’s the challenge.”McIntyre’s said his inspiration to pursue political science came from personally watching John Dean testify against Richard Nixon — for what would later be known as the Watergate scandal — in a hearing chaired by his senior senator, Sam Ervin. McIntyre said that event and expressing ‘faith in the little things’ helped him see the services he could provide as someone in public service and bring integrity in the much-maligned field of political science.“I didn’t know any friends at all that were going into political science,” he said. “They said, ‘It is so dirty and so corrupt why would you want to be involved in that?’ But for me it was the opposite effect because those of us with the right motives and ideas don’t get involved …“I have plenty of doctors, bankers, realtors, teachers, even carpenters, plumbers and asphalt layers who come see us in Washington because they know the government will affect their jobs and what they studied to do. … When we think about being faithful to little things and what God calls on us to do, the question is are we willing to lay our faith and apply it to whatever services we have? My situation, I had the opportunity to go up to [the University of North] Carolina and decide to major in political science thinking one day I’ll get to go back [to Capitol Hill].”From his historical inspiration to his political career that came 22 years later, McIntyre said being alert and willing to act on God’s calling helped him see the success he enjoys today.“Pray, prepare, pursue,” he said. “We talked about how prayer ought to be the first resort and not the last resort. I challenge you to do that. Someone challenged me to keep a prayer journal. I don’t know if any of you do that, but write down your prayer request and then reflect on how God answers them.”Tags: Notre Dame Right to Life, Right to Lifelast_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Lecture features Irish secret society

first_imgThe Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies hosted graduate student Jessica Lumsden for the Shamrocks and Secrets lecture series, which focused on early 19th century Ireland and the growth of a secret and frequently violent society known as the Ribbonmen.Although many rumors concerning the Ribbonmen still circulate, Lumsden said there are only a few established facts on the society and consequently little historical investigation into the subject.“What we do have is we have many, many police reports; we have letters of gentlemen who were actively investigating the Ribbonmen; we have newspaper coverage of Ribbon crimes; we have a collection of captured passwords and oaths and signs,” she said. “So you have all these things that indicate what Ribbonmen were up to or at least what they thought they were up to.”Lumsden said much of what we know about Ribbonism comes from the personal testimonies of informers claiming to be part of the society, as well as scattered references to Ribbonmen in Irish literature.The sources reveal Ribbonmen operated on both a local and national level, she said. On the local level, Ribbonism was primarily agrarian and the Ribbonmen were involved in “trying to control local trade, local land, local politics and do some local policing of the community.”On the national level, Lumsden said Ribbonism supported the nationalist movement and worked to repeal the Act of Union that both declared Ireland a part of Great Britain and merged the British and Irish parliaments.“Ribbonmen are actually critically important to Irish history, and they’re forgotten for a number of reasons,” she said.Emerging from the remains of a previous secret society known as the Defenders, the exclusively Catholic Ribbonmen became active around 1810 and gained traction between 1816 and 1824, Lumsden said.Violence was a key component of Ribbonism, and Lumsden said members often left “coffin notices” containing death threats. The 1816 murders at Wildgoose Lodge, in which the Ribbonmen burned alive an informant and his family, cemented Ribbonism’s status as a powerful secret society characterized by violence.“It caused uproar in Ireland,” she said. “This was violence that was not unknown, but it was violence that was attached to this secret society that was a new secret society, so that gave it some weight.”Lumsden said following a schism which divided the Ribbonmen into two factions – the Dublin Ribbonmen and the Ulster Ribbonmen – the capture and trial of the secretary of the Dublin Ribbonmen resulted in the collapse of Dublin Ribbonism.The Ulster Ribbonmen disintegrated soon after, she said, and by the mid-19th century, Ribbonism no longer occupied the position of power it once held.“The specter of Ribbonism really gets broken after the 1840s,” she said.The Ribbonmen’s legacy lies in their intricate national network, which Lumsden said enabled the persistence of Irish nationalism.“These Ribbonmen built this diasporic network of Irish nationalism and fed that fire and kept that network alive so that it could be used by later nationalist groups,” she said. “The Ribbonmen keep alive this nationalism, and then they spread it.”Tags: Ireland, Jessica Lumsden, Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, Ribbonmen, Shamrocks and Secrets lecture serieslast_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Edit-a-thon aims to highlight notable women

first_imgTags: Center for Digital Scholarship, Edit-A-Thon, Hesburgh Library, History Museum, SB150, Wikipedia Keri O’Mara | The Observer Students, faculty and staff are invited to gather in the Hesburgh Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship on Tuesday to create or edit Wikipedia pages for important women in Notre Dame and South Bend history.The Women’s History Month Edit-A-Thon, sponsored by Hesburgh Libraries, the Center for Digital Scholarship, Student Government and the History Museum in South Bend, is open to the public and will take place from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.Visiting assistant librarian Kai Smith said participants will work from a list of local women who do not have pages or whose pages need updating.“The majority of these women don’t have pages at all, except for, I think, a few that are related to Notre Dame history,” she said. “For the majority, people are going to be able to create pages for them.”The Edit-A-Thon is part of a wider effort in South Bend to increase representation of women on the Internet encyclopedia’s pages. Similar events took place earlier this month at the St. Joseph County Public Library and the History Museum, as part of the the South Bend’s 150th anniversary celebrations.Smith said participants will use the library’s resources, including the University Archives, to find the information for the pages, and there will be help for people who have never edited Wikipedia before.“For people who are beginners, we have some training that we can give them, teach them how to edit Wikipedia pages, and the librarians will be available to assist the people with scholarly research and citing,” she said.Among the women whose articles will be added to Wikipedia’s nearly 4.8 million are Florence Epsy, the first female Notre Dame employee and librarian; Delores Leibeler, the first female reporter in Notre Dame Stadium’s press box; and Isabel Charles and Sr. John Miriam Jones, two associate provosts in the 1970s.The list of women important to South Bend history includes Sr. Maura Brannick, who founded the St. Joseph Health Center; Janet Allen, the first woman elected to the South Bend Common Council; and Jean Savarese, a costume preservationist known as “the costume lady.”“There are artists and teachers,” she said. “There’s the former head of the South Bend Public Library, Virginia Tutt. There are a number of pretty amazing women on this list.”Smith said while one of the goals of the Edit-A-Thon is to close a “gender gap” in Wikipedia editing — according to a 2010 Wikimedia survey, only 13 percent of Wikipedia editors are women — anyone is welcome to attend.“We definitely want to be teaching people about the library, the skills that we can teach people and also the sources that we provide,” she said. “But in addition, it’s Women’s History Month, and learning about the women important to Notre Dame and South Bend history, and how you can research, write and publish their stories in Wikipedia.”last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

State senator examines Indiana labor policy

first_imgFor believers in the power and need for collective bargaining, Indiana State Sen. John Broden says now is an incredibly frustrating and troubling time. “In the last five to six years, a lot of our labor laws have fallen to the wayside. If you believe that labor organizations have the right to collective bargaining, Indiana has certainly taken a number of steps back,” Broden said. Tuesday night, the Higgins Labor Studies Program Friends and Alumni Network sponsored a discussion with Broden, who graduated from the University in 1987, in which he focused on fighting for laborers rights in the Indiana State Senate. “I’ve loved working in the General Assembly, but it’s definitely gotten more challenging. I’m a Democrat, and we’ve always been the minority but we’re even more severely the minority now,” Broden said. “Indiana has traditionally sort of been a swing state, it’s not monolithically Republican. But right now, at the state legislative level, it is.”Though 32 members of the Indiana General Assembly were Republicans when Broaden was sworn in, there are currently 40 Republicans, making up a more significant majority.“The 32 members that are Republicans were much more moderate strain when I was sworn in than the 40 members that are there now. Now, you know, we’re seeing more and more conservative members beating those more moderate members in elections, and we’re losing that middle, more moderate group,” he said. Broden said his most difficult fight came over the common construction wage, which the Republicans wanted to repeal.“It appeared that logic was thrown out the window. The only people who were for this were non-union contractors, who did very little public work, and then there were very right wing people that were just ideologically opposed to this,” he said. “… and that’s what was so frustrating about this, because we then ended up repealing the common construction wage.”Broden talked about his growing frustration with the Republican majority in the General Assembly, particularly in regards to workers rights.“Running against teachers unions became very popular for Republicans. They were calling them out for protecting bad teachers, and then those bills passed, and then you know, Right to Work was next to go,” he said. Regarding Indiana’s recent status a Right to Work state, Broden said he was discontent with the way that legislation had been passed. In Right to Work states, labor unions are allowed, but workers in unionized professions cannot be forced to join unions.“Indiana is now what they call a Right to Work state. For a while, we avoided kind of taking up this fight, but you know you look around and there were a lot of members who wanted that. Recently, though, we’ve lost some members who were against Right to Work, so they were able to get that bill passed,” Broden said. Looking to the future, Broden said he is working on policies regarding the minimum wage in Indiana. “It’s extremely frustrating if you believe in labor rights, because things like minimum wage right now are being challenged and that’s something that we’re really fighting for but you know, we just can’t get it passed,” he said. Broden said his passion for politics and labor rights came primarily from his time at Notre Dame. “I really enjoyed my curriculum at Notre Dame, it confirmed everything I thought about politics, which I was interested from the very early days,” he said. “Two of my favorite courses were in labor studies, and there’s labor and labor history but then more importantly there’s labor economics, which sparked an interest in me that remains today.”Tags: John Broden, Right to Work Rachel O’Grady | The Observer State senator and Notre Dame alumnus John Broden discusses the variety of issues the Indianalegislature faces regarding minimum wage, right to work status and other labor policies.last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Professor emeritus of physics dies

first_imgPaul R. Chagnon, professor emeritus of physics, died March 22 at the age of 86, according to a press release issued by the University on Tuesday.“Chagnon taught physics and conducted research in nuclear physics at Notre Dame for 32 years before retiring in 1995. He published numerous articles on his research, and was admired as a stalwart of Notre Dame’s physics faculty. His teaching is honored annually at Notre Dame’s commencement ceremonies by the undergraduate Paul Chagnon Service Award,” the release stated.Chagnon graduated from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1950 and received a doctoral degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1955.“He taught at the University of Michigan, Northwestern University and Boston University before joining Notre Dame’s faculty in 1963,” the release stated.Chagnon’s funeral Mass will be celebrated at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.Tags: department of physics, Paul Chagnonlast_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Administration analyzes Campus Climate survey results

first_imgIn the results of the 2016 Campus Climate survey, 14 percent of respondents indicated they had experienced some form of non-consensual sexual intercourse or contact while a student at Notre Dame.That number, vice president of student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding said, is too high. “We know, always, that these instances are happening on our campus, and that is not what we want,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We want to do everything we can to prevent these instances, and make students feel comfortable with reporting. You still see that it’s happening, but you still see there is underreporting, which is sobering, but it motivates us to do more and work harder.”While the number is down 2 percent from the 2015 result, Christine Caron Gebhardt, director of the Gender Relations Center at Notre Dame, says there is still a long way to go to get that number down. “That’s not us sitting back and saying ‘[The number] declined so we must be doing great things,’” Gebhardt said. “It’s us saying ‘Great, it declined — what more can we do?’”Hoffmann Harding said it is encouraging to see awareness of policies regarding sexual assault is high. “I was really proud of students who don’t think this behavior should be tolerated on our campus,” Hoffmann Harding said. “The numbers are really good. We’ve seen some of the education programs … give way to a big bump in awareness strategies, so that’s good news.”Heather Ryan, deputy Title IX coordinator, said she was happy to see that 98 percent of respondents indicated they would identify at least one University resource for support. “That [resource] can be wherever they want to go for them, so that was good news in my opinion,” Ryan said. However, according to the results of the survey, only 10 percent of students who indicated they had experienced non-consensual sexual intercourse reported this to the University. The challenge, Ryan said, is removing some of those barriers to reporting incidents.“If we’re going to make a difference here, we have to figure out what’s holding students back,” Gebhardt said. “We’re really trying to empower them and help them see there are resources and things available.”Satisfaction rates for respondents that have reported incidents to the University and gone through the processes were low, according to the results, which is a major focal point for improvement, Ryan said. “We receive feedback on an ongoing basis,” she said. “Continuing to remain open to those conversations is really important … but I think we can do better with that.”The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention (CSAP) will meet in the coming months to address these barriers and other notable results of the survey. “We try to take our students’ experience, dig deeper into what you’re all saying in focus groups and then look at peer institutions and say, okay let’s hold our programs, our initiatives, the things that we’re doing under a light and see what’s effective,” Gebhardt said. “But let’s not do things because we’ve done it before, let’s do things because they’re effective.”The University plans to administer the survey every other year, Hoffmann Harding said. “We will do focus groups to learn from the results, so we’re not just surveying and surveying,” Hoffmann Harding said. “We’re trying to learn, talk with our community about what the survey has shared with us. For us, that feels like every other year is about the right time frame for us to look at that.”Tags: campus climate, GRC, sexual assault, Student Affairs, Title IXlast_img read more

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