8 May
2021

Prep Sports Roundup: 2/20

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys Basketball3-A State Second RoundNEPHI, Utah-Ty Allred amassed 22 points and 10 rebounds on 10-12 from the field (including 2-3 from range) as the Juab Wasps dismantled South Summit 54-40 Saturday in the second round of the 3-A state playoffs at Juab High School.The Wasps were +9 (27-18) on the glass and amassed seven blocked shots as well in improving to 19-3 on the season. Juab next faces Richfield Thursday at 12:50 pm in the state quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center.Brigham Skinner and Payton Sanderson had 11 points apiece in defeat for the Wildcats.Region 20 TournamentChampionship GamePANGUITCH, Utah-Treyson Roberts’ 10 points led the way as the Bryce Valley Mustangs edged Piute 37-34 Saturday at Panguitch High School, earning the Region 20 tournament championship. Kelby Jessen had 12 points in the loss for the Thunderbirds.3rd-4th place GamePANGUITCH, Utah-Kyler Bennett stepped up with 13 points and the Panguitch Bobcats downed Valley 51-32, earning third place in the Region 20 Tournament at Panguitch High School Saturday. Cooper Esplin had 10 points for the Buffaloes in defeat.Girls Basketball3-A Second RoundRICHFIELD, Utah-Rebecca Poulsen amassed 20 points, including six 3-pointers, as the Richfield Wildcats pounded South Summit 57-24 Saturday in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament. Sadie Eiting had 7 points in the loss for the South Summit Wildcats. Richfield next faces Carbon Thursday at 4:10 pm in the 3-A state quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center.PRICE, Utah-Amiah Timothy posted 23 points as the Carbon Dinos drilled Summit Academy 57-36 in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament Saturday.MORGAN, Utah-Janel Blazzard netted 21 points and 8 assists, leading the Morgan Trojans to a 66-46 rout of Manti in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament Saturday. Heidi Jorgenson had 15 points in the loss for the Templars. Morgan next meets South Sevier Thursday at 5:50 pm in the 3-A state quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center.MONROE, Utah-Presley Chapell stepped up with 16 points and the South Sevier Rams decimated North Sanpete 67-31 Saturday in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament. Eryn Briggs led the Hawks in defeat with 11 points.DELTA, Utah-Jadee Dutson led the way with 12 points and the Delta Rabbits edged Union 47-43 in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament Saturday at the Palladium. Kinslee Drake had a game-high 14 points for the Cougars in defeat. Delta next draws Emery Thursday at 7:30 pm in the 3-A state quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center.CASTLE DALE, Utah-Bethany Justice and Bailey Jacobson had 13 points apiece and the Emery Spartans crushed Providence Hall 69-25 Saturday in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament. Kinley Peterson and Mia Degn had 5 points apiece for the Patriots in defeat.SALT LAKE CITY-Teya Sidberry posted 18 points and 14 rebounds and the Judge Bulldogs downed San Juan 55-41 in the second round of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament Saturday. Emilie Palmer had 15 points in the loss for the Broncos. Judge next faces Grantsville Thursday at 9:10 pm in the 3-A state quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center.GRANTSVILLE, Utah-Emily Backus led the way with 19 points and Grantsville shellacked Juab 70-32 Saturday in the second roud of the 3-A girls state basketball tournament. Avia Stowell had 11 points for the Wasps in the loss.Region 20 TournamentChampionship GamePANGUITCH, Utah-Kinley Spaulding stepped up with 12 points and the Milford Tigers waxed Piute 51-42, earning the Region 20 tournament title at Panguitch High School Saturday. Kassidy Westwood had 20 points in defeat for the Thunderbirds.3rd-4th Place GamePANGUITCH, Utah-Jannie Hoyt netted 21 points and the Valley Buffaloes drilled Wayne 58-47 Saturday at Panguitch High School. Valley earned third place in the Region 20 tournament with the victory. Abby Stevens had 16 points and 8 rebounds for the Badgers in defeat. Brad Jamescenter_img February 20, 2021 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 2/20last_img read more

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3 May
2021

St. Mary’s Hospital for Women & Children Birth Records

first_img Miranda and Mark Hall, Richland, Ind., daughter, Berkley Ethleen, Oct. 8Macie Medcalf and Trevor Ivy, Patoka, Ind., son, Liam Vincent James, Oct. 9Julie and Matthew Taylor, Boonville, Ind., son, Wyatt August, Oct. 9Davesha Pruitt, Evansville, son, Jaxon Eriks, Oct. 9Chelsey Howard and Hoseau Gott, Evansville, son, Jarhmiah O’Shea, Oct. 11Alisha Compton and Marcus Green, Evansville, daughter, Amiracle Lanaye Louise, Oct. 11Kelley Murray and Tereshio Everhart, Evansville, son, Kyndrick Kyrie, Oct. 11Adrianna and Jose Rivera, Evansville, daughter, Gabriella Grace, Oct. 11Jacqueline and Logan Miller, Evansville, daughter, Amiyah-Grace Alexanderia, Oct. 11Leirin Reinitz and Kieven Hillard, Evansville, daughter, Evelyn Jane, Oct. 12Jennifer Underwood and Burton James, Evansville, daughter, Jaylynn Paige, Oct. 13Amanda Crabtree and Kristopher Springmeyer, Albion, Ill., son, Abel Patric, Oct. 13Jana’ Hazelwood and Bobby Goodman, Evansville, daughter, Jai’Anah Raquel, Oct. 13Carrie and Bradley Caver, Rockport, Ind., son, Cayson Jack Charles, Oct. 14Ashley and Andy Braker, Newburgh, son, Colton William, Oct. 14Addasyn Wallbaum and Anthony Tucker, Mount Carmel, Ill., daughter, Andi Renee, Oct. 15Jacinta and Tyler Marshall, Evansville, son, Liam Tyler, Oct. 15FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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18 Jan
2021

Lessons of the Tony Awards! Kelli O’Hara, Darren Criss & More

first_img Darren Criss Star Files This year’s Tony Awards were totally out of this world. Fun Home took home the trophy for Best Musical, a tearful Alex Sharp transformed from recent Juilliard grad to Tony winner before our eyes, and oh right, Kristin Chenoweth wore an E.T. costume for some reason. Stop playing “Ring of Keys” on repeat for a sec, because it’s time for the Lessons of the Tony Awards!2015 Tony Winners Respect Your TimeUsually, Tony winners make the awards ceremony all about them. “There’s so many people I’d like to thank.” “This award means so much to me.” “I’d like to dedicate my award to the memory of my late mother.” Geez, how selfish can you be? This year, however, the winners made it all about you by keeping their speeches short and sweet. The show ended on time, and you were in your jammies by 11!The Worm Isn’t Kelli O’Hara’s Only MoveThe sixth time’s the charm for The King and I star Kelli O’Hara. The Broadway sweetheart is finally a Tony winner, and she celebrated by proving that she can, in fact, do the worm! And tap dance! She even busted out some weird interpretive stuff we’re not really sure how to categorize! You’re our favorite Tony-winning worm, Kelli. Wriggle the night away—you’ve earned it.Alan Cumming Has a Not-So-Secret CrushLove was in the air—no, not just Mr. and Mrs. O’Hara’s love for their Tony winning daughter—Alan Cumming’s giant-super-borderline-creepy love for Josh Groban. The co-host swooned, fawned and fainted over the Grammy-winning singer all night long. Alan, after seeing your convincing impression of Kelli O’Hara, there’s no doubt you could dress as Kat Dennings and put one over on Groban at the after party.Josh Groban Might Be a SoothsayerBy the way, was Groban trying to send us a secret message during the “In Memoriam” tribute? Call us crazy, but while he was singing “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” we could have sworn we heard him whisper, “Carousel is coming to Broadway next season.” Maybe it’s just wishful thinking, but #soreadyforaclambake.Ruthie Ann Miles Is an EnvironmentalistThe King and I star Ruthie Ann Miles became the official Broadway Recycling Ambassador when she opted to bring her cell phone on stage to read her acceptance speech instead of a piece of paper. Way to do your part, Ruthie! Hey, um, we know we said we’d take compost duty at the post-show party but uh, we’ve been working all night and we’re kinda tired. Rain check?Didn’t Get Nominated? You Still Win!The Tonys typically showcase the plays and musicals that actually, um, you know, were nominated for Tony Awards. But this year, a ton of air time was given to shows like Fish in the Dark, It Shoulda Been You and Finding Neverland, which were completely snubbed. Hey, we’re all winners at the Tonys…especially the woman who wrote that random email David Hyde Pierce read.Darren Criss Took Manganiello TechniqueWhen Magic Mike hunk Joe Manganiello asked Darren Criss which teacher made an impact on his life, the Hedwig star quipped that he learned everything he knows from watching Magic Mike. Darren, we know you’re kidding, but we just had a brilliant idea. You. This. Next season. And bring Carousel with you.Young Stars Stole the ShowWhile seasoned celebs like Helen Mirren and Tommy Tune were honored at this year’s awards, the evening was really made electric by 11-year-old Sydney Lucas, who performed the emotional “Ring of Keys” from Fun Home, and Curious Incident’s Alex Sharp, who won his first Tony after graduating from Juilliard. Congratulations! You’ve made us all feel horribly inadequate.Everyone’s Shagged Bradley CooperWhen Alan Cumming joked that he’d slept with Tony-nominated The Elephant Man star Bradley Cooper, his co-host Kristin Chenoweth revealed that she, too, had slept with Bradley. Wow, are we the only ones who haven’t slept with him? Bradley, why won’t you return our calls? We’re here for you. Always.Cheno Is the Hostess with the MostessThe On the Twentieth Century powerhouse may not have won a Tony this year, but she proved she’s capable of absolutely anything. She sang, she danced, she phoned home, she jumped out from under a dress, she sang some more, she danced some more, she changed costumes about 87 times and OH RIGHT HOSTED THE SHOW. Your move, SNL.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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30 Dec
2020

Turn It Off

first_img“You’ve got to be kidding me.”I dumped the contents of my dry bag onto the ground, picking through the soggy candy wrappers and first aid supplies until not a single item had gone unturned.“Daddio, let’s go!” my friend shouted from the river’s edge.It was six o’clock. Daylight was fading fast. Our group of three had decided not two hours earlier that we would try to squeeze in a lap down the Big Sandy, a class IV-V run at the heart of the Cheat River watershed. I’d waited an entire year to run this classic stretch of West Virginia whitewater, arranging my travels so I could be in the area when spring flows peaked. Though we’d be pressed for time, I was excited to get my personal first descent (PFD) and document the adventure with my trusty sidekick, a GoPro Hero 3+.The only problem? I’d forgotten the GoPro mount.“Dude, what took you so long?” my friend asked as I finally situated myself in the cockpit of my kayak and slid into the water.“I was looking for my GoPro mount,” I said.“Well, where is it?”“I forgot it.”My friend’s eyes widened. He rammed my boat with the bow of his.“What do you mean you forgot it,” he asked? “How are we gonna get shots of you coming off Wonder Falls?”“That’s not what it’s about,” I said, hardly convincing myself. “Let’s just paddle.”We set off downstream, and for the first half hour, I barely took notice of the immense rock walls rising from the river and the golden sunlight peeking over the treetops—I was too busy kicking myself for forgetting that stupid piece of plastic.In my mind, I could see the picture that I’d never have: the spray of Wonder Falls against an early evening haze, my green boat soaring off the lip of that glorious 20-footer, blade planted firmly, face part-bewildered, part-determined. No. There would be none of that. There would be no evening GoPro viewing over a round of beers, no posting a photo of my first waterfall run to Instagram, no proof that I’d even paddled the Big Sandy at all save for a bloody knuckle and my friend’s word.So would anyone believe that it had happened at all?This isn’t the first time I’ve struggled with being in the moment and wanting to document it, too. I once hiked for two hours in the dark to shoot a sunrise, only to realize at the summit that I’d left my camera battery plugged into the wall back home. And while, eventually, I was able to get past my irritation and enjoy the picturesque morning in technology-free, unadulterated bliss, I couldn’t help but let one dangerous thought sneak into my consciousness—I got up at 3 a.m. to hike for nothing.Of course, it wasn’t for nothing. While there would be no mountaintop selfie to share with my friends on Facebook, the scene of the rising sun illuminating the valley floor remains imprinted in my memory as clear as if I had seen it yesterday. Still, it got me thinking: why was I up there anyway? Was it really for the sunrise?There’s no denying that the reach of social media has extended far beyond our screens. Adventure photographers like Corey Rich and Renan Ozturk post to Instagram amid the world’s most extreme settings. From the Dawn Wall of El Capitan to the high altitude peaks of Myanmar in Southeast Asia, armchair travelers can revel in the exotic and the epic without ever leaving their desktop. These days, social media is inescapable, seemingly as essential to adventure as the adventure itself.But is that necessarily a bad thing? While it could be argued that social media platforms have taken away the mysteries of the world and exploited our natural playgrounds, particularly designated wilderness areas, is it possible to make the case that social media has actually played an important role in getting more people outside?Mike Cordaro is an active Strava user, but says the app doesn't dictate his time in the woods...mostly.Mike Cordaro is an active Strava user, but says the app doesn’t dictate his time in the woods…mostly.“It’s a double-edged sword for sure,” says Mark Eller, communications director for the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) and mastermind behind the online forum MTB Project.Eller has spent the better part of his life on a set of wheels. Just a few years ago, however, his obsession with riding took a different turn when he downloaded a new social media app designed with the competitive rider (and runner) in mind: Strava.Touted as an all-encompassing fitness app that logs everything from calories burned to GPS coordinates, Strava certainly isn’t the only app of its kind. But its ability to break down rides into segments and put users’ times against each other on a digital leaderboard has spurred a new generation of athletes to go hard in pursuit of their rightful place atop the cyber podium as King of the Mountain (or KOM).“We call them ‘Stravaletes’,” says New River Bikes owner Andrew Forron. “That or ‘Strava-assholes.’”If you couldn’t tell, Forron’s not the biggest fan of Strava. In fact, should you find yourself on a group ride in the New River Gorge with Forron at the helm, don’t be surprised if he asks you to turn it off. If you don’t, consider this: he’s not afraid to do it for you.“I think it’s terrible,” Forron says about Strava. “I think it’s changed how people interact together when they go places. It used to be when you went somewhere, you went to the bike shop, met the folks there, and tried to get in on their after-work ride.”Now, Forron says, cyclists don’t need the bike shop community to find the cool local loops in town—all they need is a little cell coverage and a Strava account.“It creates a false sense of community,” Forron adds, “and it’s caused more people to ride alone.”Though there’s undoubtedly some truth in Forron’s claim, for riders like Eller, Strava affords ambitious individuals an outlet for that need for speed.“It allows you to have a competitive riding experience wherever you are, whether you’re with someone else or not,” Eller says of the fitness app. “I’m a dad with a three-year-old and a six-year-old, and for a number of years, I haven’t been able to go out to races. Strava opened the door to get that competitive vibe back in my riding.”Mike Cordaro of Mount Pleasant, Penn., couldn’t agree more. Look up any route on Strava in the southwestern corner of Pennsylvania and Cordaro’s name is likely somewhere near the top five. In total, Cordaro’s racked up over 50 KOMs on his home turf in preparation for this year’s National Ultra Endurance (NUE) series, and says the app has helped him keep track of his weekly averages (three rides, 80 miles, seven and a half hours in the saddle).“I’m not chasing KOMs every time I go,” Cordaro says, “but it motivates me. I see other people ride [on Strava] and feel like I need to get after it.”And while Cordaro and Eller and, heck, even Forron, can agree that anything which motivates you to get on your bike is ultimately good, Strava has recently come under legal attack for influencing cyclists in particular to ride faster on trails that have no business being the stage for an unofficial time trial.“Public trails don’t necessarily make great race courses,” Eller says. “You have to be discerning about when and where it’s appropriate to gear your brains out.”“Strava’s not a reason to forgo trail etiquette,” Cordaro adds. “Ultimately, if [competitive cycling] is your goal, the best way to do that is racing.”Still, even Eller admits to allowing his competitive instincts to get the best of him, riding for weeks at a time without ever turning Strava off. But in a blog he posted on IMBA’s site titled “Confessions of a Strava Addict,” Eller brings up a good point, stating, “…it’s not like my nerdy geek posse wasn’t comparing times before Strava.” Whether by Garmin or by pencil and paper, mountain bikers have been keeping track of ride data for as long as mountain biking has existed.The only difference now? You can’t fudge the facts, something Maryland-based kayaker Ian Wingert knows all too well.Photo cred: Justin StephensPhoto cred: Justin StephensBack in early March, Wingert and two of his fellow paddlers, Todd Baker and Wyatt Hyndman, successfully navigated the first descent of Cucumber Falls outside of Ohiopyle, Penn. At almost 40 feet in height, Cucumber Falls isn’t the tallest waterfall to be run in the Laurel Highlands, but it’s likely the driest.“We knew it was going to run one to two days a year,” Wingert says. “We can’t really afford trips to Mexico or the Northwest, so when this came along, we knew we had to do it.”The crew had been scouting the line at Cucumber Falls for nearly three years but the water level was never high enough for an attempt. After a few days of heavy rain and snowmelt in late February 2015, however, the opportunity finally presented itself—it was now or never.With a friend setting safety at the bottom, all three paddlers styled clean lines over the drop. But it was in the pool below the falls that two of the three, Wingert included, got into trouble. A fallen log blocked the current’s main flow on river right, creating what’s referred to as a “strainer.” Though Wingert and Hyndman hit the log head-on, they flushed through and escaped unscathed. Baker altogether avoided the strainer and safely eddied out above, but as the three would soon find out, that log would prove to be the least of their problems.“The video made it look like we disregarded the fact that there was wood at the bottom and like we were disregarding safety,” Wingert says of the two-minute edit Baker compiled from their first descent footage.The video, which Wingert and Baker’s employer Immersion Research (one of the whitewater industry’s leading gear manufacturers) later posted to its Facebook page, attracted over 100,000 views and received nearly 2,000 shares in the first few hours of going live. The first descent was suddenly viral, but not without controversy.“Just dumb,” read one comment.“I’m calling that bad etiquette. Bad safety and stupid,” read another.Yet countless more comments rallied in defense of Wingert and his crew, arguing that, as with any adventure, not everything goes according to plan. Risk is inherent in any endeavor, especially when it comes to tackling first descents.Screen Shot 2015-03-05 at 1.05.17 PM“A lot of people who saw it as negative thought it was dumb luck, like we weren’t talented paddlers, just dumb kids with GoPros,” Wingert says. “It brought me down in the moment,” but not so much that he turned away from social media altogether.Whether he’s cranking out laps on the Top Yough in his backyard or making multi-day kayaking trips down to western North Carolina, Wingert is as active on social media as he is in a boat and says that Facebook in particular has been a useful tool in organizing paddling trips. What’s more, the ‘group’ function on Facebook allows area paddlers to post updates on rivers and creeks, notifying other river users about access issues, environmental threats, water levels, and, ironically, new strainers. A simple status update can rally a post-work group paddle. Stranded at the takeout without a shuttle?“It’s great for that kind of thing,” Wingert says. “It’s cool to see what everyone else is doing, unless you’re stuck at work and your friends are paddling.”While Wingert is hesitant to say whether or not he would ever attempt Cucumber Falls again, he is certain that his group won’t be the last. And as for the falls? A sign posted by state park officials the day after Wingert’s first descent now reads loud and clear.Cucumber Run closed to boating.Photo cred: Justin CostnerPhoto cred: Justin CostnerThe closure of Cucumber Run and the subsequent falls is just one of many instances where the power of social media has forced officials to respond in a way that’s not exactly favorable to outdoor enthusiasts. One of the biggest culprits these days? Instagram.“It’s a really touchy subject,” says western North Carolina-based photographer Justin Costner on shooting photography in public lands.Though Costner himself has never had any run-ins with the Forest Service, he’s heard enough horror stories about court dates and hefty legal fines that he’s taking the better-safe-than-sorry approach by purchasing a commercial photography permit.“I understand not violating the forest, but I think people should have the right to shoot photos from their adventures and trips,” he says.Costner, like any respectable outdoor recreationalist, practices Leave No Trace (LNT) principles and respects even the strictest of regulations in areas like the Linville Gorge Wilderness, but not all photographers are as considerate.In March 2014 for instance, popular Instagrammer Trevor Lee (@trevlee) was charged with nine misdemeanors for camping and climbing trees in undesignated areas of Yosemite in pursuit of a better angle. Later that same year, Casey Nocket (@creepytings) made national news when she posted Instagram photos of portraits she had painted on rocks in eight national parks. Though Nocket called it “art,” the park service had a different word for it: vandalism. Lee and Nocket are extreme examples of a gram-gone-bad, but their trials should serve as warning to Instagram users with tunnel vision for the perfect shot.In general, though, the average Instagram user is an amateur photographer with a trigger-happy finger and a desire to be inspired. That’s how Jessica Georgia (@jessicageorgia) came to decide to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail and document all 2,180 miles of the journey through her Instagram feed.“One of my passions and hobbies is photography,” Georgia says. “That’s initially what got me into Instagram, but then I started finding outdoor locations I didn’t even know existed.”From there, Georgia started getting inspired in a big way, and not just to take more photographs: hiking became her newfound love. The idea of thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail was romantic to Georgia, who, at 30 years old, is both a wife and a mother to a 12-year-old daughter. But when her family hiked through the Grayson Highlands during peak thru-hiking season, Georgia got the affirmation she needed that the A.T. was her calling.“It was so inspiring and I was so envious,” Georgia recalls, “but at the same time, I didn’t know if I could do it.”Yet just a year later, Georgia was taking her first steps along the white blaze at Springer Mountain. To ease the distance between mom-on-the-trail and family-at-home, Georgia says she tries to update her Instagram as frequently as possible so her daughter may be able to better grasp what a thru-hike actually entails.@jessicageorgia @jessicageorgiaTake a quick scroll through her feed and you’ll see the good and the bad of thru-hiking: swollen feet, bug bites, fellow hikers, trail angels, sweeping vistas. Following Georgia’s Instagram is about as close as you can get to hiking the trail yourself without ever leaving your home. And for Georgia, the supportive network of followers has been just as rewarding to her as the hike itself.“It’s encouraging when you can post something to Instagram and have people say, ‘That’s amazing Jess keep going!’ Having that community cheering you on is definitely a mental boost,” something that, as any thru-hiker can attest to, will surely brighten even the worst of days.Like Georgia, that sense of community is what I cherish about social media. Though my Facebook feed is often plagued with incoherent political and personal rants, it’s proven invaluable as a tool for making connections and finding story ideas. In fact, each and every one of the people I interviewed for this story were all contacted initially via social media, be it through Facebook or Instagram.But, as nearly all of my subjects pointed out, that’s not to say there aren’t pitfalls to the platforms. Do I think there’s such a thing as “oversharing”? Yes: I don’t need to see everything you eat. Do hashtags annoy me? When there are more hashtags than caption copy, most definitely. Does social media dictate the way I choose to spend my time in the outdoors?Absolutely not.As I sat atop that summit watching the rising of the sun, the weight of a battery-less camera sinking into my lap, I wasn’t thinking about the likes and comments I wouldn’t receive. I was thinking how damn lucky I was to be me in that moment witnessing one of the most overlooked miracles of this world.As Mark Eller from IMBA so simply put it, “People have to remember that you can turn it off if you want to.”So turn it off, if you want to.last_img read more

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18 Dec
2020

CUNA Board approves membership choice

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The CUNA board of directors Thursday approved revising the trade’s bylaws to eliminate the dual membership requirement, expand CUNA membership to include individuals and organizations in the industry and potentially reduce the size of the board.“While the board strongly believes in an interdependence model – one in which CUNA is working in concert with our league partners on behalf of credit unions – we also believe that the time is now for CUNA to change and modernize its bylaws in response to the evolving needs and demands of our credit union members,” CUNA Board Chairwoman Susan Streifel said. “A key component of that change will be to institute bylaws that accommodate membership optionality, or choice, while also strengthening the ability of CUNA and the leagues to work together as credit unions’ strongest advocates.” continue reading »last_img read more

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19 Oct
2020

China warns US against ‘McCarthy-style paranoia’

first_imgChina’s top diplomat Thursday warned the United States against “McCarthy-style paranoia” as tensions rise between the two superpowers.Beijing and Washington have been sparring over a slew of issues, from a new national security law in Hong Kong to trade and US criticism of China’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.”The current US policy toward China is based on strategic misjudgements… and McCarthy-style paranoia,” China’s foreign minister Wang Yi said, referring to US senator Joseph McCarthy, who led an anti-communist crusade in his country in the 1950s. Topics : But Wang said China is still willing to resume dialogue at all levels to resolve differences.”China and the United States should not seek to transform each other, but should jointly explore ways for peaceful coexistence of different systems,” he said. center_img In a pre-recorded speech to a China-US think tank forum, at which former US secretary of state Henry Kissinger also spoke, Wang warned that “artificially creating various China threats may eventually lead to self-fulfilling prophecies.”The comments come weeks after Wang said relations with the United States were “on the brink of a new Cold War”, fuelled in part by tensions over the coronavirus pandemic.US President Donald Trump has accused Beijing of a lack of transparency, and pushed the unproven theory that the virus may have leaked from a Chinese maximum-security laboratory.”The United States should immediately stop politicizing the epidemic… and work with China to promote global cooperation on fighting the virus,” Wang said.last_img read more

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6 Oct
2020

Warning as stamp duty escalates

first_imgStamp duty is rising three times faster than house prices says the HIA.STAMP duty is rising three times faster than house prices, and unless checked will significantly drain the pockets of future homebuyers, industry analysts have warned.The latest Housing Industry Association Stamp Duty Watch report warned that state governments were becoming increasingly reliant on housing taxes to fill coffers.“Stamp duty bills have increased almost three times faster than house prices since the 1980s and this trend will continue unless stamp duty is reformed,” said HIA senior economist Shane Garrett.Victoria’s typical stamp duty bill jumped from 1.9 per cent to 5.2 per cent of the median dwelling price between 1982 and 2017 — equivalent to a 4,000 per cent surge in the cash value of stamp duty.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus22 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market22 hours agoNSW homebuyers saw stamp duty rise from 1.6 per cent to 3.8 per cent during that time, while Queenslanders were somewhat less encumbered having gone from 1 per cent to 1.6 per cent. Stamp Duty as a Proportion of Median Dwelling Price, 1982 to 2017: Source: HIA“Increases in home prices cause stamp duty bills to accelerate because stamp duty rate brackets are rarely updated. This is the problem of stamp duty creep.”State government revenue from stamp duty had almost doubled in the past four year, Mr Garrett said, going from $11.7b in 2011/12 to $20.6b in 2015/16 — most of which was off residential building. “State governments are increasingly reliant on rising stamp duty revenues. This situation is not sustainable. The stamp duty burden is increasing under every metric: nominal dollars, real dollars, as a proportion of dwelling prices and as a share of total state revenue. Without reform, this trend will continue.“By draining the pockets of homebuyers to the tune of over $20 billion each year, stamp duty is a central pillar of the affordability crisis. A long plan to do away with the scourge of stamp duty would be a huge victory for housing affordability in this country.” FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more

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28 Sep
2020

‘Fixer Upper’ brings farmhouse style to 1930-built home

first_imgShaker cabinetry used in the kitchen is often found in United States homes.Fittings and fixtures include bespoke shaker cabinetry, American oak timber floors, timber wall panelling and french doors. MORE: Hoarder’s home — ‘worst house in best street’ An island for the price of a city home The poolside cabana is one of the agent’s favourite spots.She said some of the outstanding features included the gazebo near the pool and the kitchen and butler’s pantry.According to the realestate.com.au listing, the 7 Brae St has a modern farmhouse design on an elevated 539sq m block. MOST VIEWED: 7 Brae St, Coorparoo was Queensland’s most viewed property on realestate.com.au this week and the second most viewed in the country.THIS week’s realestate.com.au most viewed home in Queensland looks like it’s fresh from the set of (former) United States television show Fixer Upper with Chip and Joanna Gaines. Belle Property Coorparoo agent Amanda Beck said since the property was launched to the market on Wednesday (October 17, 2018) the inquiry on email and phone had not stopped. No space was wasted in the revamp.According to CoreLogic, the 1930-built home was purchased for $835,000 in July last year (2017), Ms Becke said it had since undergone a complete overhaul by Rachael Turner at Front Porch Properties.“It’s been a year in the making, they’re literally still doing final touch-ups today, cleaning and last minute items,” she said. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus16 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market16 hours agoRelaxing spaces are everywhere to be found at this Coorparoo home.Included among its international appeal is the mud room, which Ms Becke said was a great feature for Queensland families.“In the States and Europe the mud room is used for when you come in out of the snow,” she said.“But here it’s just a great room for kids to plonk their school bags, their school hats and shoes and things before traipsing through the house.” >> FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK << Out with the old, in with the new — the farmhouse trend is set to the next big thing in Queensland.Ms Beck said the home’s popularity indicated that the farmhouse style was on trend and about to take off in the Queensland market.“The Hamptons look has been very on trend for the last couple of years … and was really appealing to everyone, and I think this is the new, on trend, modern farmhouse appeal, which Queenslander’s lend themselves beautifully to,” she said. RELATED: Mini-farm for sale in Coorparoolast_img read more

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27 Sep
2020

Human Rights – but only if they’re politically correct

first_imgThe Human Rights Commission is beside itself because we have sent the Gender report to all schools.This is a report that contains international research and statements made by leading doctors and psychiatrists in this field.It warns of the harm of the ‘Gender Agenda’ and helps schools negotiate this difficult issue by calling for empathy towards children and families affected – but also calling for science and research to guide the debate.But all the HRC can do is call us names. No wonder most NZ’ers treat them with contempt. Perhaps they should reflect on the harm they are causing!Here’s some of the expert commentary in the report, which the Human Rights Commission is labelling ‘homophobic’ ‘transphobic’ and harmful:CANADIAN KENNETH ZUCKER, one of the leading researchers and clinicians in the world on this topic and the chair of the group that determined how this issue would be handled in the DSM, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders“On the surface, the approach comes across as very humanistic, liberal, accepting, tolerant of diversity.” “I don’t think the goal of therapy is to make a child feel bad about who they are. It’s helping kids understand themselves better and what might be causing them to develop what I call a “fantasy solution,” that being the other sex will make them happy.”· DR. RICHARD GREEN, one of the oldest researchers in this field and an active and strongly outspoken advocate in LGBT advocacy within the professional associations, expressing similar concerns:“Are you helping or hurting a kid by allowing them to live as the other gender? That’s a study that hasn’t found its investigator yet.”· Investigation was conducted in the mid- to late-seventies by JON MEYER, THEN DIRECTOR OF JOHNS HOPKINS’ SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR UNIT. The New York Times explains in their report on this study that there were, “no differences in long-term adjustment between transsexuals who go under the scalpel and those who do not.”· PAUL R. MCHUGH, the long celebrated and retired psychiatrist-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital,“Gender dysphoria is not a problem of the body but the mind… Cutting at the body does not do a great deal to heal the mind“We psychiatrists would do better to concentrate on trying to fix their minds and not their genitalia.”· GEORGINA BEYER explains, “I don’t think a seven- year-old has enough life experience to understand precisely what they’re doing. I think it’s better a person gets to puberty and through puberty…” before such drastic and consequential efforts are taken.No clinician recommends medical treatment (hormonal / surgical)…for prepubertal children.· RITCH SAVIN-WILLIAMS, a noted advocate for LGBT youth health and well-being and an expert in this field of suicidal ideation. He explained,“First off, scientifically it’s not true. …[F]rom a scientific perspective, there is certainly no gay suicide epidemic.”· A report of the U.S. Surgeon General and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention“[I]t is not known whether LGBT people die by suicide at higher rates than comparable heterosexual people.”OUR RESPONSE Designed by Family Firstlast_img read more

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23 Sep
2020

City of Batesville awarded $217K in Next Level Roads grant

first_imgBatesville, IN—The City of Batesville was awarded a $217,091 grant in state matching funds for local road projects through the Next Level Roads: Community Crossings Initiative on Tuesday, April 7.The City will utilize the funds to improve and repave road projects including Huntersville Road from Sycamore Street to the railroad tunnel, Westbrook Drive, EGS Boulevard, Edgewood Drive, Fisherman Drive, White Oak Drive, and Hawthorne Court. “We are extremely grateful to receive this grant and appreciate the leadership of Governor Eric Holcomb and Indiana Department of Transportation Commissioner Joe McGuinness who make this possible for us,” said Mayor Mike Bettice. “While we continue to battle the COVID-19 crisis that has impacted us greatly this is a nice win for us to celebrate.”Batesville is one of 214 cities, towns and counties that have been awarded this grant which combined for a total of $126.5 million statewide. As part of the grant, the City will provide local matching grants of 25 percent and also submit an INDOT-approved asset management plan for maintaining existing roads and bridges.last_img read more

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