21 Apr
2021

New venue and format for SAMB event

first_imgThe Scottish Association of Master Bakers’ (SAMB) annual conference is to take place from 16-17 May, 2009 with a new venue and format.Staged at the Dalmahoy Hotel and Country Club in Edinburgh, it will start on the Saturday afternoon with technical sessions, followed by the presidential banquet with Abba tribute band, Feeva. On Sunday morning the SAMB will install its new president, Alister Asher.The delegate rate is £160 for a single occupancy room, or £221.75 for double occupancy. This includes all meals, teas and coffees, VAT and accommodation. Additional items are the registration fee and the cost of the presidential banquet.l For more information contact the SAMB on 0131 229 1401.last_img

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2 Mar
2021

For Rebelution, Everything Is ‘Falling Into Place’

first_imgReggae rockers Rebelution have released their fifth studio album, Falling Into Place. The Santa Barbara-based group has been making music together for more than twelve years and has managed to maintain a consistent sound without going stale. Released on the band’s own 87 Music label in partnership with NYC’s Easy Star Records (just as with their last album “Count Me In”), Falling Into Place is a cohesive display of bandmates rooted in reggae, yet comfortable enough to experiment with their collective influences, including dancehall, hip-hop, and funk.Listen to the album below, streaming via Spotify.Never shy about singing for and about the ladies, frontman Eric Rachmany delivers racy lines like “Slap on some reggae, get the room to bubble up / So I can work your body from sundown to sun up” in the sensual tune “Pretty Lady.” The equally sultry “Santa Barbara” is a love song dedicated to a wild-eyed one that got away, as well as the city where it all began for Rebelution. “Upper Hand” bemoans a power struggle, and while some critics have been quick to call this track “pop”-y, others have come to the band’s defense to explain that what we’re hearing is traditional Jamaican dancehall-inspired beats. Speaking of haters, Rachmany explained on his live stream of the album this past Thursday, that the opening track, “Know It All,” is a big middle finger to all those who spew hate online, hiding cowardly behind their computer screens. Preach it! (Before learning this, the fan theory that this song was about Donald Trump was also hilariously viable…)A Rebelution album would be incomplete without a solid ganja anthem or two, and “Inhale Exhale” is just that. This song features Jamaican reggae artist Protoje, and gives a shout-out to the impressive lift provided by cannabis from California, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, and of course, Jamaica. Nothing will quite top 2007’s “Green To Black,” but it’s still a dope track that will no doubt incite the urge to spark one up, if you hadn’t already.Things get personal on “Those Days,” which Rachmany professed is his personal favorite, and features a chord progression he developed before Rebelution even existed. This autobiographical track really gives listeners a peek into the frontman’s upbringing in San Francisco. Influenced by the Bay area rap, hip-hop, and funk of his childhood, “Lay My Claim” is his second favorite, and is both inspirational and cocky (in the best sense of the word). The album concludes with “Breakdown,” a cautionary tune pleading us to slow down and enjoy time, as we have it.Overall, Falling Into Place delivers the feel-good vibes we’ve grown to depend on, along with fresh energy and the confidence that comes from being one of the most well known and loved reggae roots bands in the game. This release, combined with a supporting summer tour, will assuredly capture the hearts of a wide array of old and new fans all across the country.You can purchase a physical or digital copy of the album here. Sit back, relax, and let the music get up in ya!last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

Radhika Nagpal, expert on swarm robotics, celebrated among ‘Nature’s 10’

first_img Read Full Story Radhika Nagpal, the Harvard computer scientist whose self-organizing swarm robotics are today’s state of the art in collective artificial intelligence, has been named among Nature’s 10, the ten scientists and engineers who “made a difference” in 2014.Nagpal is the Fred Kavli Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University.In February of this year, her research group announced the creation of a robotic construction crew, inspired by termites, which is capable of assembling blocks into 3-D structures without any human intervention. And in August, Nagpal’s group unveiled its thousand-robot swarm, a massive assembly of small robots that collectively arrange themselves into shapes, interacting much like a school of fish or a flock of birds. Dubbed “the first thousand-robot flash mob,” these Kilobots demonstrate the power of computationally simple programs to collaboratively and autonomously execute complex behaviors.“The beauty of biological systems is that they are elegantly simple — and yet, in large numbers, accomplish the seemingly impossible,” Nagpal said. “At some level you no longer even see the individuals; you just see the collective as an entity to itself.”Nagpal’s research sheds light on the nature of coordination in large groups in order to better understand natural systems like social insect colonies and multicellular self-organization, and to engineer robust and powerful technologies like multi-robot systems for use in search and rescue, construction, or agriculture.last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

A prize of a weekend

first_img Related Rehearsing “Cuchifrito” by Carlos Henriquez for @niemanfdn #Pulitzer100 celebration at @Harvard pic.twitter.com/KZQYgm3IbV— Wynton Marsalis (@wyntonmarsalis) September 8, 2016 Luminaries from the worlds of journalism, photography, history, and music gathered over the weekend at Harvard to mark the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize, in festivities hosted by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.Jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis, who won the 1997 Pulitzer for his work “Blood on the Fields,” opened the celebration Saturday evening at Sanders Theatre with a performance by his quintet, following an introduction by Harvard President Drew Faust. (Watch a clip from his rehearsal below) Ahead of this weekend’s gathering, journalist Bob Woodward muses on the press, and sees plenty of hope Celebrating the Pulitzers at 100 On Sunday, in readings, conversations, and performances, past prize winners touched on the event’s theme of accountability and abuse of power.Among the speakers was investigative journalism titan Robert Caro, who wrote the masterwork “The Power Broker” about the extraordinary life of Robert Moses, an unelected city planner in New York who wielded more clout than any governor or mayor for more than 40 years. Caro also wrote the definitive multivolume biography about Lyndon B. Johnson, an ongoing project.Caro, a two-time Pulitzer winner, said the initial idea for “The Power Broker” came to him during an urban planning and land use class that he took while at Harvard as a Nieman Fellow in 1965–66. The course covered where and why highways get built, a seemingly mundane and tangential question for a political reporter.But the class led to Caro’s inquiry into Moses’ plan in the 1920s for a parkway across northern Long Island, a project that turned out to be a thread that would unravel a grim, hidden account of the “human cost” of Moses’ reign. The experience taught Caro a fundamental lesson about influence: “Regard for power implies disregard for those without power,” he said.“The story of the Northern State Parkway was not only the story of how Robert Moses dealt with the powerful; it was also the story of how Robert Moses dealt with those who had no power. In order to write about power truthfully, I decided, it was necessary to write not only about the man who wielded power, but the effect of power on those on whom it was wielded.”The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward, perhaps the most powerful and influential reporter of the last 50 years; Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras, who aided publication of information about the National Security Agency surveillance program leaked by Edward Snowden; and Dean Baquet, executive editor of The New York Times, engaged in lively debate about the quality of mainstream media coverage and the many missed questions in the run-up to the Iraq War that exposed both the “mundane” and “larger failures” of the press. They also disagreed about what history will say about the job the press has done identifying and explaining the transformation of power inside the U.S. government that has taken place since the 9/11 terror attacks.Citing stories that he said reporters need to hunt down vigorously, Woodward pointed to the “holes in our understanding” about presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, such as Trump’s still-unreleased tax returns and a cache of nearly 15,000 emails from Clinton’s time in the State Department that haven’t been made public.Baquet said he would argue in favor of publishing Trump’s tax returns if the press obtained them. Woodward said The Post would most certainly publish the returns if it gets them, even though it’s a federal crime, publishable by five years in prison, to do so. He joked that he agrees with Post colleague Kevin Sullivan that the tax returns are so essential to the public’s understanding of Trump that Post reporters should each “take a day” in jail.“Some things you have to do,” he said.In a videotaped interview with Nieman Curator Ann Marie Lipinski, “Hamilton” creator and performer Lin-Manuel Miranda discussed how the themes of both giving up and losing power are interwoven into his musical’s rich narrative. He also addressed the challenges he faces in his creative process, and in finding his artistic voice.In “One Last Time,” a song about how Alexander Hamilton wrote George Washington’s farewell address as he stepped down from office, Miranda sees contemporary parallels in the pursuit of power.“One of the trappings of power is that you become convinced that the problems of your country are uniquely yours to solve. That’s the rationalization,” he said. “And that’s how you get to dictatorship, and that’s how you get to despotism. That’s how you get to tyranny, and that’s how you get to a mayor’s third term.“You convince yourself that ‘I alone can solve these problems,’ when the faith needs to be in the institution itself.”last_img read more

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27 Feb
2021

Transforming Business, Not Just IT – EMC’s Executive Briefing Program

first_imgThe growing digital economy is disrupting industries and pressuring organizations to transform business models. More than ever before, consumers expect to get what they want, when they want it and conduct business in a mobile, 24×7 marketplace. IT needs to enable the new speed and expectations of business. So, how does IT keep up? How do they meet the needs of their company’s workforce as well as the expectations of customers?I am proud to announce the opening of EMC’s 11th Executive Briefing Center (EBC) in London, U.K to service the EMEA theatre. Our global Executive Briefing Program is committed to helping our customers overcome challenges and realize the full potential of true digital transformation. Through personalized one-on-one sessions with EMC Executives and Subject Matter Experts, our customers can better understand how to use our modern infrastructure to create entirely new operating models, experiences, revenue opportunities, and value.Adrian McDonald, President EMEA once said, “The EBC is about fostering collaboration and the conversations that lead to transformation. It’s about helping our customers understand how technology solutions can further enable their business. It’s about finding a better way.”Be sure to schedule a briefing today by visiting EMC.COM/EBC.last_img read more

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31 Dec
2020

Global energy storage boom to Increase 122-fold by 2040

first_imgGlobal energy storage boom to Increase 122-fold by 2040 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:Global energy storage deployment is expected to increase 122-fold over the next two decades to 1,095 GW/2,850 GWh by 2040, according to a new BloombergNEF (BNEF) report, published Wednesday.BNEF estimates this storage boom will require $662 billion of investment, even though the cost of lithium-ion batteries is expected to fall by 50% over the next decade.The research company also forecasts that renewables will account for almost 40% of the world’s electricity by 2040, up from 7% today, due to falling prices.The global transformation of the power grid toward renewable energy sources is expected to catapult the deployment of energy storage systems to new heights, while the anticipated electrification of the transportation sector and the power demand from that will help further reduce costs.BNEF pointed to the stationary storage and electric vehicle markets as the main drivers of the upcoming battery boom. “Two big changes this year are that we have raised our estimate of the investment that will go into energy storage by 2040 by more than $40 billion, and that we now think the majority of new capacity will be utility-scale, rather than behind-the-meter at homes and businesses,” Yayoi Sekine, energy storage analyst for BNEF and co-author of the report, said in a news release. Despite this positive outlook for the storage industry, S&P Global Platts Analytics identified raw material prices, fire protection and potential import tariffs as potential risks to future price reductions.More: Global storage deployments to hit 2,850 GWh by 2040, increasing 122-foldlast_img read more

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18 Dec
2020

Will blockchain change the world?

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Any time a tech innovation reaches the mainstream, it’s accompanied by an intense hope: Could this be the long-awaited answer to all of our problems?So, naturally, blockchain technology is having something of a moment.Much of the reason the technology has people so excited is its promise to inject transparency and immutability into any situation, project, or process it’s tracking.These qualities make it possible for us to imagine a single source of truth: One ultra-secure system that stores every piece of data we will ever need, never forgets it, and makes it available to everyone. continue reading »last_img

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16 Dec
2020

Selden Teen Charged With DWI in Fatal Hit-and-run Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A teenager was arrested for allegedly driving drunk, causing a crash that killed a 31-year-old Coram man and fleeing the scene in Port Jefferson Station on Sunday night, Suffolk County police said.Danny Bonilla ZavalaDanny Bonilla Zavala, 19, of Selden, was driving a Nissan Maxima southbound on Route 112 when he crashed into a Toyota Corolla near Sagamore Hills Drive and ran away at 5:10 p.m., police said.The other driver, Bob Hidalgo, was pronounced dead at the scene. His 30-year-old wife, Taisha, was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.An officer apprehended the suspect shortly later. He was taken to John T. Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson for treatment of minor injuries.He was charged with driving while intoxicated and leaving the scene of an accident resulting in injury or death. Police said he also gave investigators a false name. He will be arraigned Monday at First District Court in Central Islip today.Major Case Unit detectives impounded the vehicles, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on the crash to call them at 631-852-6555.last_img read more

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17 Oct
2020

Governor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget Address

first_img Budget News,  Remarks,  Videos Pennsylvania State CapitolHarrisburg, PATRANSCRIPT:I. A Commonwealth in crisisLieutenant Governor Stack, Speaker Turzai, President Scarnati. . .Leader Corman, Leader Costa, Leader Reed, Leader Dermody, members of the General Assembly…Members of the judiciary, members of the cabinet, the auditor general, the attorney general, the treasurer, and my wife, Frances…Most importantly, my fellow Pennsylvanians:This will not be an ordinary Governor’s budget address.Usually, this speech is an opportunity to lay out an ambitious agenda for the year ahead.Under ordinary circumstances, I would outline my 2016-17 budget proposal, a proposal full of ideas to move our Commonwealth forward.I would talk about new measures I’m proposing to ensure that every child in Pennsylvania has a world-class education that starts before kindergarten and goes all the way through college.I would talk about the new partnerships we can create between the public and private sectors to help create jobs and grow our economy.I would talk about new innovations that can build on the progress we’ve already made in modernizing our state government so that it costs less and works better.And I would talk about some long-overdue steps we can take to help our Commonwealth fulfill the promise of equal opportunity and economic security for all: including protections for the LGBT community in housing and the workplace, the legalization of medical marijuana, a raise in the minimum wage, and criminal justice reform that will bring fairness back to our system and save tax dollars.But I can’t give that speech. Not under these circumstances.My fellow Pennsylvanians: Our Commonwealth is in crisis. A crisis that threatens our future.And today, I want to be clear – with each member of the General Assembly, and with every Pennsylvanian – about the actions we must take to resolve this crisis, and the consequences we will all face if we don’t.II. This is about mathFirst, let’s be very clear about the nature of the problem.The problem is not that Republicans in the General Assembly and I don’t see eye-to-eye.After all, Pennsylvanians are used to seeing political leaders disagree, even strongly. And in the 2014 election, they chose divided government: a Democratic Governor, a Republican legislature. I doubt anyone was surprised when it turned out that we had different priorities.No, this crisis is not about politics at all.This is about math.Pennsylvania now faces a $2 billion budget deficit.That’s not a Democratic fact or a Republican fact. It’s just a fact.It’s a fact supported by Standard and Poor’s – an independent rating agency. They have done the math. And they agree: Pennsylvania faces a massive structural deficit that will only continue to grow if we fail to address it responsibly.This deficit isn’t just a cloud hanging over Pennsylvania’s long-term future. It is a time bomb, ticking away, right now, even as I speak.If it explodes – if the people in this chamber allow it to explode – then Pennsylvania will experience a fiscal catastrophe the likes of which we have never seen.Please understand: We are not talking about a long-term budget projection. We are talking about Pennsylvania failing to meet its basic obligations – this year. We are talking about pain that will be felt across our Commonwealth. This year.If the General Assembly does not approve a responsible plan to solve this crisis, every Pennsylvanian will suffer the consequences. Those consequences will be real. They will be immediate. They will be severe.Nearly three-quarters of Pennsylvania homeowners will see their already-too-high property taxes skyrocket even further.If a member of this body were to stand up and propose a massive property tax increase, he or she would be booed off the floor by Democrats and Republicans alike.But in fact, that is exactly what will happen if we do not act.We have seen this play out over the last four years. Since 2011, school districts have been forced to increase local property taxes by $1.2 billion, and all because of Harrisburg’s irresponsibility.In the last year alone, 83 school districts increased property taxes above the index because Harrisburg didn’t produce a responsible budget, and another 175 school districts are contemplating additional tax increases this year – for the same reason.This tax shifting is not sustainable, and it will only continue to squeeze families and seniors if we do not stop passing the buck on to local communities.Meanwhile, even as Pennsylvanians will pay more, they will get less from their state government. Far less.For example: Our education system, already threadbare after years of underfunding at the state level, will take a ruinous hit.· Thousands of teachers will be laid off. Guidance and career counselors will be handed pink slips, as well. In all, more than 23,000 education professionals will be immediately yanked out of Pennsylvania schools.· Across Pennsylvania, already-crowded classrooms will become even more so. Class sizes will balloon by 30 percent to account for all those teacher layoffs. Worse, the consequences will not be evenly distributed – classroom crowding will be more severe in the schools that can least afford it. But all across our Commonwealth, our children will receive less attention, less instructional time, less opportunity to gain the skills we need them to have in the 21st century.· Technical education programs will be cut. Special education programs will be cut. Head Start programs will be cut.· And tens of thousands of Pennsylvania children will lose access to pre-kindergarten, depriving them of early childhood education that we know is key to their future success.This is not a threat. This is not political posturing. This is simply what the math tells us will happen if this crisis is not resolved. This is the reality that teachers, and parents, and children in our Commonwealth will face if the General Assembly does not act.And the damage will not be limited to our schools. Basic state services will also face devastating cuts.· We will lose nearly $200 million in services to Pennsylvania seniors including prescription drug assistance and home and community based services. Pennsylvania seniors who depend on that assistance will be forced to pay more out of pocket. Some will have to choose between paying for groceries and paying for the medicine that keeps them alive. These are our elderly parents and neighbors, and they are counting on this funding to pay for the medicine they need. But if we don’t have a budget, we can’t help.· We will lose $180 million in assistance for people living with mental illness or intellectual disabilities. These Pennsylvanians are the most vulnerable among us, and they are counting on our help to live a full life and contribute to their communities. But if we don’t have a budget, they will be denied significant opportunities to improve their lives.· We will lose $40 million in state funding for child care, and thus forfeit nearly $50 million in federal matching funds, for a total cut of nearly $90 million. Hundreds of thousands of working parents are counting on our help to have some peace of mind and the ability to earn the living upon which they raise their families. But if we don’t have a budget, 211,000 Pennsylvania children will have nowhere to go.· We will lose $11.5 million in funding for domestic violence shelters and rape crisis centers. Survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault rely on these safe havens to have somewhere to go in the midst of unthinkable pain and unspeakable terror. But if we don’t have a budget, those shelters and crisis centers will have to shut their doors to the people who need them.Critical programs such as these make up nearly three-quarters of our human services budget.Simply put: the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania cannot meet its obligations to its citizens if the General Assembly does not meet its obligation to pass a responsible budget.And while my Administration will always strive to tackle fraud and be as efficient as possible, even these harsh new cuts – cuts that will harm single mothers, seniors on fixed incomes, and those who are down on their luck – will not solve our crisis.Indeed, anyone in this Chamber who claims we can simply cut our way out of this mess without also increasing revenue is just ignoring the math. They’re also ignoring history. If we don’t have sustainable revenue sources in our budget, the result will be billions of dollars in new property tax hikes.Pennsylvanians need to prepare for these consequences. And I do not say this with any joy whatsoever.But someone in Harrisburg has to start telling the people of Pennsylvania the truth about the mess we’re in.III. What hasn’t workedBefore I ran for Governor, I ran a business. And in challenging times, I know that you can be fiscally responsible while still looking out for the people you serve. These values are not mutually exclusive; they are closely linked.And if you’re in business, and the numbers don’t add up, you can’t ignore the problem, or spin it, or wish it away.You have to take a clear-eyed look at how the problem arose, and then you have to solve it. And fast. Or you won’t be in business very long.Pennsylvania businesses don’t have the luxury of pretending their problems don’t exist. Neither do Pennsylvania families sitting around the kitchen table trying to make ends meet.And the truth is, neither do we here in Harrisburg.So let’s be honest about where we are and how we got here. After all, this fiscal crisis didn’t appear from out of nowhere. This was no act of God. We are in a hole we dug ourselves, right here in Harrisburg. And if the consequences I’m describing sound familiar, it’s because Pennsylvania has been building up to this moment for years.For years, our leaders tried to balance our state budget on the backs of our children and our schools. When I took office, Pennsylvania ranked near the bottom of the country in the percentage of state-level K-12 investment. The burden of funding our schools fell on our local communities. And that, in turn, meant huge spikes in property taxes for Pennsylvania homeowners.That’s a bad way to solve a budget problem. But it’s a great way to create an education problem.We were left with tens of thousands of teachers laid off and crowded classrooms across most of our school districts.And that was just part of the problem. You see, even these huge cuts to education weren’t enough to balance the budget. But instead of finding a sustainable way to deal with our deficit, Harrisburg chose to paper over the problem with a series of budgetary gimmicks and quick fixes.Maybe you can get away with that for a little while. But sooner or later, the rent is due.And if folks here in Harrisburg thought this sleight of hand was a real solution to our budget problem, then the only people they were fooling were themselves. Because nobody else bought it.The three major ratings agencies – Fitch, Moody’s, and Standard and Poor’s – have each downgraded our credit, a total of five times over the last five years. Our credit has actually been downgraded three times in the last two years alone.And each time, the ratings agencies have explained that the downgrades are a direct result of these little tricks Pennsylvania has employed to avoid facing up to the reality of its fiscal situation.When Harrisburg doesn’t take our budget problem seriously, the folks who rate our credit stop taking Harrisburg seriously.Today, because of years of budgetary irresponsibility, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is considered to be among the least creditworthy states in America. This is embarrassing. But embarrassment isn’t the point.You see, because our credit has been downgraded so much, we are forced to pay a higher rate of interest on our $17 billion in debt. That will eventually cost us an extra $139 million a year.That’s $139 million that doesn’t go to improving our schools, or making our business environment more competitive, or lowering our taxes. It’s a $139 million penalty that the people of Pennsylvania pay for Harrisburg’s fiscal irresponsibility.IV. We had a dealThat’s how we got here. And it’s why, when I took office last year, I proposed a different kind of budget.Instead of shortchanging our schools, I proposed a historic commitment to education – beginning to restore the $1 billion that had been cut from our schools under the previous administration, making new investments in early childhood education and community colleges, increasing our state’s share of funding for public schools, and directing more of that funding to districts that needed it the most.And instead of using sleight of hand to avoid dealing with our deficit, I proposed a serious plan to balance our budget and set us on a more sustainable course.No more gimmicks. No more quick fixes. A new approach in Harrisburg. A fresh start for Pennsylvania.Now, I expected that Republicans wouldn’t agree with everything in my proposed budget.What I didn’t expect was what I got: a budget that didn’t even balance.Incredibly, the budget they sent me relied on the same gimmicks and quick fixes that had gotten us in trouble in the first place – $1.5 billion worth of optical illusions that would have made our actual budget problem even worse.If you were running a business, and you took a budget like this to your banker, you would be laughed out of the room. But Pennsylvania’s creditors don’t have a sense of humor about this sort of thing. And neither should we.While I was disappointed by the Republicans’ proposal, I wasn’t discouraged.So I came to the table ready to talk. Ready to negotiate. Ready to compromise.It took months of bargaining. It took some painful sacrifices from both sides. But in the end, all that hard work paid off. We had a deal.The compromise budget I worked out with members of this legislature last year included some of what I wanted – including a historic investment in our schools – but not everything. It included some of what Republicans wanted – including historic changes to our pension and liquor systems – but not everything.And I continue to believe we should solve these decades old problems.We still need changes that provide taxpayers savings and stability in our pension plans, and we need to bring our liquor system into the 21st century.However, these improvements by themselves are not magic bullets, and changes in these two programs will not alone mitigate the consequences of a continued failure to acknowledge the basic math problem we face.Again, the compromise budget included these Republican priorities. But most important of all, the compromise budget was balanced. It solved the financial problem. Passing it into law would defuse the fiscal time bomb and set us on a more sustainable course.It passed the Senate with a majority of both Democrats and Republicans, and had bipartisan support in the House.All that remained was a final vote before I could sign it into law and we could finally move forward.I was ready, pen in hand.And then House Republican leaders just…walked away.They walked away from the table and went home for the holidays without holding that final vote. They still have not held that final vote. And because of that, we still don’t have a budget.But we still have a budget crisis. That fiscal time bomb is still ticking.Our teachers hear it. Our parents hear it. Our seniors hear it. Our creditors certainly hear it.Do you?But the time for games is over. And now it’s time to finish the job we should have finished last year.V. We can’t keep diggingNow, look. Arguments over policy priorities are healthy. Democracy entails disagreement. Compromise is hard.But we had those arguments. We worked out our disagreements. We reached a compromise. Republicans and Democrats sitting in this chamber right now sat at a table with me and did the hard work to find common ground.We had a deal. And then the House Republican leaders walked away.Only in Harrisburg could that be seen as an acceptable way to do business.But you know what? I’m not interested in the inner workings of the Republican caucus. I’m not interested in the politics of any of this.This isn’t about politics.Once again, this is about math.And so here’s what’s really frustrating: When some Republican leaders bailed on our agreement, I was handed yet another budget where the numbers didn’t add up – a budget that would cut another $95 million from our schools, a budget that would zero out funding increases for our institutions of higher education, and, worst of all, a budget that still didn’t balance.We are sitting at the bottom of a $2 billion hole. It is simply unbelievable that some folks in this chamber want to keep digging.I can accept that we disagree about the importance of education. I can accept that we disagree about the proper role of government in securing a more prosperous future for our Commonwealth. And I can accept that I won’t get my way on everything.But I can’t accept – Pennsylvania can’t afford – another irresponsible budget that ignores the fact of this fiscal crisis and pretends our problems don’t exist.I didn’t run for this office to be party to the corner-cutting and budget gimmickry that got us into this mess. We can’t afford to play political games while this crisis is casting a dark shadow on our future. There is simply too much at stake.The train has been careening down the tracks for years. Now the moment of impact has arrived. And whether or not we crash is up to the people in this chamber.It’s up to the people in this chamber to save our children, our seniors, our most vulnerable populations from bearing the brunt of devastating cuts.It’s up to the people in this chamber to save our taxpayers from getting handed the bills Harrisburg wasn’t responsible enough to pay.It’s up to the people in this chamber to save Pennsylvania’s future.It’s time for the people in this chamber to get back to work.VI. The path forwardThe good news is that I still have my pen. And we still have a budget that reflects months of hard work and honest negotiation, a budget that has been approved by bipartisan majorities in both chambers of our legislature, a budget that averts this fiscal catastrophe and gives us a chance at a fresh start.We can get it done. Send that compromise budget to my desk, and we can put our Commonwealth on more secure footing than it has been in years.But let me be very, very clear with each of you in this chamber: We are going to have to stop playing games with our fiscal future. We are going to have to stop closing our eyes and hoping our problems go away. We are going to have to face facts.So do not send me another budget full of gimmicks that are too cute by half. Do not send me another budget where the numbers simply don’t add up.I will not be amused. I will not be fooled. I will not be convinced that dime-store magic tricks are a substitute for a real, responsible budget.And, more importantly, neither will our creditors. Nor the people of Pennsylvania.If you can’t agree to the budget reforms I’ve proposed, then help me find a sustainable alternative.But if you won’t face up to the reality of the situation we’re in. . . if you ignore that time bomb ticking. . . if you won’t take seriously your responsibility to the people of Pennsylvania – then find another job.Because this is not the time for denial, this is not the time for obstruction. This is the time for leaders to come together and honestly, and sincerely, take on the crisis we are facing.Because if we do not solve this crisis, whatever partisan gain you think you may win will be dwarfed by the enormous losses our state will suffer. Nobody in Pennsylvania will care one iota about the politics of a disaster that costs our Commonwealth so much.I refuse to let that happen. But I cannot stop this catastrophe alone. The people of Pennsylvania need you to do the right thing.VII. ConclusionI am not asking people in this chamber to give up their political beliefs. I am asking that they join me in mustering the political courage to meet this crisis head-on.I am asking that they do their job – and live up to their promise to uphold the constitution made when they were elected to serve in the General Assembly.This doesn’t require anyone to walk away from his or her principles. It merely requires that we each declare that our highest principle is the responsibility each of us has to the people of Pennsylvania.The people of Pennsylvania deserve schools that teach, jobs that pay, and a government that works for them.They deserve leaders who are willing to work hard and sacrifice to build a better Commonwealth – because that’s what the people of Pennsylvania do every day to build a better life for their families.Their strength, their resilience, their spirit illuminates our path forward, and gives me hope that when I stand in this chamber to give my budget address next year, it will be under happier circumstances.After all, I ran for this office because I believed deeply in our Commonwealth; in our spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship; in our longstanding tradition of tackling our challenges and seizing our opportunities with boldness and courage; integrity and honesty; in our potential to build a future as bright and prosperous as our past.I know that many of you entered public service for the same reasons. And last December, a number of Republicans and Democrats came together to prove that there are leaders in this body who can put their differences aside and get things done.After a year as Governor, despite the overwhelming challenge we now face, I still believe in Pennsylvania. The possibilities before us are still limitless. A bright future is still within our grasp.I still believe in the enormous potential of our Commonwealth.And I’m counting on everyone in this chamber to do the right thing so we can fulfill that potential.I’m ready to do the hard work to build a brighter future for Pennsylvania. I hope you’re ready to join me.Thank you and God Bless the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. You can find updates and behind-the-scenes content on the 2016-2017 budget announcement on our Facebook and Twitter all this week.Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget Address February 09, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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