12 Jul
2021

Rainbow Tourism Group Limited (RTG.zw) 2018 Abridged Report

first_imgRainbow Tourism Group Limited (RTG.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Tourism sector has released it’s 2018 abridged results.For more information about Rainbow Tourism Group Limited (RTG.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Rainbow Tourism Group Limited (RTG.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Rainbow Tourism Group Limited (RTG.zw)  2018 abridged results.Company ProfileRainbow Tourism Group Limited (RTG) is a well-established tourism and hospitality management company in Zimbabwe, with an extensive portfolio of owner-managed or leased hotels and conference facilities in Zimbabwe and Mozambique, aswell as a tour operator company. RTG operators in two sectors; Zimbabwe and Outside Zimbabwe. Its marketing and channel management division operates out of South Africa. Well-known hotels in its portfolio include Rainbow Towers Hotel and Conference Centre, A’Zambezi River Lodge, Victoria Falls Rainbow Hotel, Bulawayo Rainbow Hotel, Kadoma Hotel and Conference Centre, New Ambassador Hotel, Rainbow Beitbridge Hotel and Rainbow Hotel Mozambique. Rainbow Tourism Group Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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20 Jun
2021

Girls in School; Girls with Dignity: commitment during 16 Days,…

first_img Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Girls in School; Girls with Dignity: commitment during 16 Days, beyond Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Posted Nov 25, 2015 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Anglican Communion News Service] For the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence, we have joined together as a faith-based coalition to focus on ending violence against girls and young women in education, confident that all activism promoting equal and respectful relationship is good news, all year round, wherever and whoever we are.The 16 Days begin on Nov. 25, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women and end on Dec. 10, Human Rights Day.Education provides the foundation for girls’ development on their journey toward adult life. It plays a vital role in helping women realize their potential economically, politically and socially.But school is often not a safe place for a girl.Girls in SchoolFor girls around the world, exercising their right to education can be full of risk. They are at risk from violence on the journey to and from school and in the classroom itself. This violence may take the form of aggressive sexual behaviour, intimidation and physical assault by boys, sexual advances by male students and teachers, corporal punishment and verbal abuse.In most parts of the world, our religious institutions are major contributors to education, providing schools, colleges, universities and theological seminaries. Our sacred texts and faith traditions give us stories that empower and give voice to women and girls. We have myriad opportunities to teach and embed values that recognize and promote the equal dignity of girls and boys, young women and young men.Our schools and all our educational institutions can practice zero tolerance of sexual and gender-based violence and teach young women and men the full meaning of sexual and reproductive rights. We can work with families and wider communities to ensure that girls can complete their education, and are safe as they travel to and from school.Girls out of SchoolEvery girl has an inherent dignity as God’s creation. Making sure that every girl has access to education honors that dignity. Yet in spite of promises made to children in many international conventions and national constitutions, one in five adolescents and one in 11 primary school-aged children are excluded from the classroom. Fifteen million girls are unlikely to set foot inside a classroom (UIS/UNICEF 2015). Girls who miss out on education or who leave school too soon are less likely to develop themselves and their families and communities. They are less likely to have any say in what happens to their lives and their bodies. They are more likely to live in poverty, be trafficked and prostituted, be exposed to HIV and sexually transmitted infections, be coerced into early marriage, have pregnancies at an early age, and to die or suffer serious physical injury during childbirth.Faith leaders and the whole faith community have a vital role to play in advocating for compliance of the universal right to education and for national policy – adequately resourced – for the prevention and elimination of violence against girls in school. The new Sustainable Development Goals 4 (Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning) and 5 (Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls) provide fresh impetus for this.Thursdays in BlackJoin us as we link with a growing global movement of women and men who lament violence against women and girls and show their solidarity and commitment to ending it by wearing black every Thursday. The Thursdays in Black website links to information and tools to help us, including resources on girls’ safety in and out of school.We are using each of the three Thursdays during the 16 Days:to gather sacred narratives from the Christian and Islamic traditions that empower and give voice to girls and womento tell the stories of initiatives by our faith institutions or faith-based organisations to end violence against girls and womento promote a prayer of lament and confession and a prayer of blessing relating to the girl child.Ending Early and Forced MarriageWe recognize the connection between early and forced marriage and the lack of access to education for girls. We seek to interact with faith leaders and schools both in Muslim and Christian contexts with a view to providing safe spaces for girls and support for families faced with the economic necessity and/or the tradition of marrying their daughters at an early age. The role that faith leaders and religious belief can play in raising awareness and protecting girls is at the core of our initiative. This will be reflected in a series of short videos, stories of local initiatives, and other resources that can be downloaded here.NoXcusesThe NoXcuses campaign gives an additional faith dimension to discussions around violence against women. Testimonies have been gathered from Church leaders that reflect both the negative and positive roles that the Church plays in addressing violence. Click here for the NoXcuses website and advocacy toolkit.See here for many other resources and updates throughout the 16 Days.Anglican Communion, Church of Sweden, Finn Church Aid, Islamic Relief Worldwide, Lutheran World Federation, Mission 21, World Communion of Reformed Churches, World Council of Churches, World Young Christian Women’s Association (YWCA) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA For more information can contact the Rev. Terrie Robinson, Anglican Communion’s director for Women in Church and Society. Gender Justice Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

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17 Jun
2021

Martin-Lancaster House / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects

first_imgMartin-Lancaster House / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple ArchitectsSave this projectSaveMartin-Lancaster House / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Projects Architects: Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects Area Area of this architecture project Canada CopyHouses•Prospect, Canada Photographs:  Greg RichardsonText description provided by the architects. The Martin-Lancaster house is a 3000 square foot courtyard house, situated on the rugged Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia. It consists of four primary components: (1) a gabled garage/guest house, (2) a gabled social pavilion, (3) a north-facing service bar, and (4) an arrival court between. Save this picture!© Greg RichardsonThe arrival sequence is a procession toward the sea; past the protective garage, down into the protected courtyard, along a bench, into the foyer, then into the double-height living pavilion, and onto a terrace above the sea. The south-facing social pavilion is anchored by a totemic concrete hearth. Save this picture!© Greg RichardsonThis is an abstract, highly restrained project which is an essay on the local material culture traditions of the place. The monolithic zero-detailed, local, cedar-shingled walls and roofs respond well to the frequent wet/dry, freeze/thaw cycles of the labile marine climate. Clean curtain wall glazing allows the landscape to flow through the house. A heavy timber structure in the living pavilion signifies its social function. Save this picture!© Greg RichardsonThe passive solar building strategy is extended to the interior through the use of an in-floor, hydronic radiation system.Save this picture!© Greg RichardsonProject gallerySee allShow lessLiving with Modernity: Brasilia—Chandigarh / Iwan BaanArticles’Trimo Urban Crash’ Competition WinnersArticles Share Save this picture!© Greg Richardson+ 20 Share “COPY” “COPY”center_img Area:  3000 ft² Photographs Houses ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeMackay-Lyons Sweetapple ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesProspectHousesCanadaPublished on April 18, 2011Cite: “Martin-Lancaster House / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects” 18 Apr 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemCompositesMitrexPhotovoltaic Solar Cladding – BIPV CladdingMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardDoorsRaynorThermal Sectional Doors – FlexFamily™SinksBradley Corporation USASinks with WashBar Technology – Verge LVQ SeriesExterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingStonesCosentinoNon-slip Treatment – Dekton® Grip +Metal PanelsSherwin-Williams Coil CoatingsValflon® Coating in Edmonton Public LibraryWallcovering / CladdingLinvisibileLinvisibile Boiserie and Skirting Systems | OrizzonteMineral / Organic PaintsKEIMMineral Paint in Beethoven HausWall / Ceiling LightsEureka LightingCeiling Recessed Lights – OutlineFurnitureFrapontWood Furniture and EquipmentMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?马丁-兰卡斯特住宅 / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/128577/martin-lancaster-house-mackay-lyons-sweetapple-architects Clipboard Martin-Lancaster House / MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/128577/martin-lancaster-house-mackay-lyons-sweetapple-architects Clipboardlast_img read more

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16 Jun
2021

Brewery raises £22,000 for Macmillan, its charity of the year

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 28 May 2004 | News Brewery raises £22,000 for Macmillan, its charity of the year Tagged with: Events Research / statistics  29 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Jennings Brewery employees and pub staff and regulars across the North of England helped raise more than £22,000 for Macmillan Cancer Relief as part of the company’s 175th anniversary celebrations.The charity was chosen as the company’s charity of the year for 2003 but money is still coming in. Staff fundraising activities included a sponsored barrel push, climbing 175 peaks of Britain’s highest mountains, and the creation and merchandising of a nude staff calendar a la Calendar Girls.While national and international companies are often top of the list for corporate fundraisers, there are many other local and regional companies that run charity of the year programmes that are worth approaching. Advertisementlast_img read more

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15 Jun
2021

Fifty years after the Selma to Montgomery march, anti-racist struggle continues

first_imgAn upsurge in mass demonstrations and rebellions across the United States portends much for developments in 2015. The federal government and ruling class have not seriously addressed the underlying factors associated with the rise in police killings and other racist incidents.The profound disconnect between the ruling Democratic and Republican parties and the African-American masses was starkly revealed last year when voter turnouts were low, while tens of thousands of people demonstrated in the streets against police terrorism and the racist criminal justice system.These militant protests and urban rebellions were not planned by the mainstream Civil Rights organizations, but grew out of the objective conditions facing tens of millions of oppressed people.Entering 2015, we see that right-wing ideology dominates the political superstructure of the U.S. Completely ignored are the growing demands by millions for decent wages, adequate housing, quality education, an end to police abuses and the cessation of military hostilities abroad.The Democratic Party, which appeals to the workers and oppressed during election years seeking their votes, is not advancing any concrete programs to alleviate the suffering and impoverishment of growing numbers of people.  Unemployment, underemployment and poverty rates remain extremely high. The decline in the labor participation rate conceals the real magnitude of the problem.A Pew Research Center study entitled “Black unemployment rate is consistently twice that of whites” was issued on Aug. 21, 2013, to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. It reported, “In 1954, the earliest year for which the Bureau of Labor Statistics has consistent unemployment data by race, the white rate averaged 5% and the black rate averaged 9.9%. Last month, the jobless rate among whites was 6.6%; among blacks, 12.6%. Over that time, the unemployment rate for blacks has averaged about 2.2 times that for whites.”Such statistics illustrate that despite the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, fundamental issues of jobs and income remain unresolved. The refusal of the federal government and the corporate elite to enact any national jobs program means that these unemployment figures will continue at the same rate or become even more disparate between African Americans and whites.The U.S. poverty rate sharply reflects these disparities. Overall, it stood at 15 percent in 2013. When race is considered, whites had a poverty rate of 10 percent, while the rate was 27 percent for African Americans — 17 percent higher. The Latino poverty rate was 24 percent, just three points below African Americans. (These figures are posted under “Poverty Rate by Race/Ethnicity” at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation blog, using data issued in March 2014 by the U.S. Census Bureau.)Consequently, it is not surprising that African Americans are expressing mass opposition to the status quo. Historically, it has been this oppressed nation in North America that has led the way in all significant democratic and working-class movements.50 years after SelmaA “white backlash” against the demonstrations demanding justice for Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and other victims of racist police violence is already in evidence. Police organizations, backed up by politicians, are decrying any public sympathy expressed toward African-American and other oppressed people who are being gunned down in the streets by the cops.These developments are taking place 50 years after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference went to Selma, Ala., to escalate an existing struggle for voting rights. Since 1965, many African Americans have been elected to public office and have entered job categories from which they had been previously excluded.However, the fundamental contradictions between the majority of African Americans and the capitalist ruling class remain. Most African Americans have been negatively impacted by the economic system’s restructuring over the last several decades.The housing crisis and the deterioration of the public sector, including in municipal affairs and education, have disproportionately robbed jobs, incomes, homes and essential services from tens of millions of the oppressed living in cities and suburbs.Ferguson, Mo., where the rebellions and mass demonstrations erupted in response to the police killing of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, represents a microcosm of African-American life in the U.S.As voting rights are besieged in many states, the Supreme Court in 2013 struck down the enforcement provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights bill. The U.S. Congress has yet to take any meaningful action to restore access to the basic right to vote, which is ostensibly a byproduct of any bourgeois democracy.Malcolm X said on Jan. 7, 1965, in a speech before the Militant Labor Forum in New York, that 1965 would be one of the bloodiest years on the racial front in U.S. history. His life was taken on Feb. 21. Then on March 7, “Bloody Sunday,” state and local police attacked hundreds of Civil Rights marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, after they left Selma on their way to Montgomery, the Alabama state capital. The Watts Rebellion began on Aug. 11.  Also, the Lowndes County Freedom Organization, the original Black Panther Party, was founded in Alabama, in the aftermath of the Selma-to-Montgomery march.Independent political action by the African-American masses must lead to new organizational forms and alliances. As a system, capitalism has run its course. Therefore, a major political movement aiming for national liberation and socialist reconstruction is required.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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14 Jun
2021

National C-FAR Series to Focus on Invasive Weeds and Bioenergy Crops

first_img In conjunction with National Invasive Species Awareness week Dr. Jacob Barney will discuss the economic and environmental pros and cons of incentivizing fast growing invasive plants as biofuel feedstocks. Barney is an assistant professor in the Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed Science at Virginia Tech. He is the featured speaker for the National C-FAR’s Lunch-N-Learn hill research seminar today (Thursday). Barney says we need to be careful when selecting and growing bioenergy crops to avoid the unintended consequence of exacerbating our nation’s serious invasive species challenges. Chuck Conner – President of the National Coalition for Food and Agricultural Research (National C-FAR) – says the presentation provides an excellent example of the value of federally funded food and agricultural research, extension and education in producing the scientific outcomes and outreach needed to meet 21st century challenges and opportunities.Seminar presentations are available online.Source: NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Energy National C-FAR Series to Focus on Invasive Weeds and Bioenergy Crops SHARE By Andy Eubank – Mar 6, 2013 Facebook Twitter Previous articleSenator Roberts Proposes Billions in SNAP CutsNext articleLawmakers Question Leaked USDA Email Andy Eubank National C-FAR Series to Focus on Invasive Weeds and Bioenergy Cropslast_img read more

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12 Jun
2021

Watchman badly hurt in grenade attack on Tamil daily

first_img August 30, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Watchman badly hurt in grenade attack on Tamil daily Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge to go further News News Follow the news on Sri Lanka Help by sharing this information July 15, 2020 Find out more RSF_en Sri LankaAsia – Pacific center_img News News July 29, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts January 13, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders strongly condemned a grenade attack on Tamil daily Sudar Oli on 29 August 2005 in which a watchman at the entrance to the building was seriously injured.Two grenades were thrown at the building by two assailants who then fled the scene.”Reporters Without Borders urges all armed political parties and movements to respect press freedom and free expression that are the essential components of any democracy,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.Sudar Oli has been targeted for several months by nationalist groups that accuse the daily of supporting the Tamil Tigers armed movement (LTTE). Last week, a photo-journalist on the newspaper, Yathurshan Premachchandran, was attacked by militants from the People’s Liberation Front (JVP) who suspected him of being a member of the LTTE.He was brutally attacked by JVP members as he covered a demonstration that was parading past him. Before beating him they also snatched his camera, mobile phone and wallet. Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalists Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trial Organisation last_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

Details of free summer camps at LIT and MIC revealed

first_imgLinkedin Mary Immaculate College (MIC) and Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) have announced details of their FREE ‘EMPOWER’ Summer Camps, which will take place this July and will be open to second-level students in transition year, fifth year and sixth year.The 5 day ‘EMPOWER’ Summer Camp programme in entrepreneurship, creativity, design skills and innovation, is funded by the HEA and is being run collaboratively between MIC and LIT in both their Limerick and Tipperary Campuses :  Limerick: 10th to 14th July and Tipperary: 17th to 21st JulyThe programme has been designed with the aim of developing skills in young people to embrace innovation, enhance and develop creativity, problem solving and critical thinking skills, through a variety of hands-on collaborative scientific thinking and entrepreneurial thinking activities, and projects. There will also be a focus on developing effective leadership and communication skills and providing the students with the opportunity to meet and network with a variety of inspirational leaders and innovators during the 5 days.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up According to Dr Maeve Liston, Director of Enterprise and Community Engagement, MIC, “The camps will also further compliment the principles of the Junior and Senior Cycles in our second level education system through high quality hands-on interactive informal learning experiences, promoting innovation, communication, personal effectiveness, critical and creative thinking, and working with others all of which are prioritised in the Framework for Junior and Senior Cycle Education.”Gillian Barry, Head of Innovation & Enterprise at LIT stated that, “This is very much a collaborative effort in enhancing the skills needs in the region where LIT and MIC are working with Entrepreneurs and academics together with organisations like Junior Achievement Ireland, Foroige, Coder Dojo, Local Enterprise Offices, and a wide variety of community groups, organisations, schools, business’ and industry. We have collaborated specifically with entrepreneurs and experts in the fields of enterprise & innovation, education, youth development, community development, creativity and leadership on the design and delivery of what is ensured to be a high quality educational programme.” She added that the programme is designed to have a high impact it will be an immersive, social and fun experience for the week with opportunities to create skills and friendships for life. Facebook MIC Lecturer Elected to Board of International Society for Music Education Limerick Post Show | FOLM Project MIC Student Experience Virtual Sessions RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsEducationDetails of free summer camps at LIT and MIC revealedBy Editor – June 10, 2017 1809 Twitter Email Print TAGSEMPOWER summer campsLITMIC International Women’s Day LIT Interested parties can register via Eventbrite.https://www.eventbrite.com/e/empower-summer-limerick-region-tickets-34948387568Places are limited so book early to avoid disappointment.For further info contact: [email protected] and/or [email protected] Advertisement New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland WhatsApp MIC Teams Up with GPA on New Scholarship Scheme for Postgraduate Students Previous articleLimerick baritone for Lyric Opera WeimarNext articleLimerick Social Democrats condemn mosque attacks Editor last_img read more

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31 May
2021

Protecting Homes From Disaster

first_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Tagged with: Disaster Legislation Related Articles U.S. Representatives from Florida Gus Bilirakis and Charlie Crist have introduced their “Shelter Act,” a plan to offer tax credits for homeowners, families, and businesses threatened by natural disasters. According to the Representatives, the bill will “help Americans protect their homes or businesses against hurricanes, tornados, floods, drought, and wildfires” by creating a “first-of-its-kind disaster mitigation tax credit for families and business owners in disaster-prone areas,” Florida Daily reports. Other supporters include Louisiana Rep. Bill Cassidy and Colorado Rep. Michael Bennet.“With Hurricane Season underway, my constituents and all Americans living in coastal regions are susceptible to these devastating storms. Disaster can strike at any time, often with little warning. It’s never too early to prepare. Taking steps now to reinforce a roof covering, or protect an exterior window, could mean the difference between saving money in the long-run and dealing with major property damage,” said Bilirakis, introduced the bill. “This legislation is about helping our communities be proactive when it comes to preparing for Hurricane Season. Our local emergency managers in Pasco, Pinellas and Hillsborough Counties do an incredible job of ensuring our communities are ready. But preparedness must also begin at home. Our bill encourages that.”“As Americans, we know all too well that disaster can strike when we least expect it. For working families who own homes and businesses, a natural disaster can leave their lives and livelihoods literally in pieces,” said Crist. “This bipartisan legislation puts power back into the hands of the people, rewarding small businesses and homeowners who prepare for the unexpected and invest in protecting their property from hurricanes, floods, and everything in between.”The bill has drawn support such as BuildStrong Coalition, the Federal Alliance for Safer Homes, the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety, the National Association of Home Builders, the National Ready Mix Concrete Association, the National Realtors Association, the Smarter Safer Coalition and Home Depot. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Disaster Legislation 2019-07-02 Seth Welborn Previous: Legislation Addresses Michigan’s Property Tax Foreclosures Next: Proceed With Caution on HMDA Deregulation Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer.  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago July 2, 2019 1,066 Views Home / Daily Dose / Protecting Homes From Disaster Protecting Homes From Disaster Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn in Daily Dose, Featured, Loss Mitigation, News Subscribelast_img read more

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26 May
2021

Custodial Deaths : Revisiting Debate On Anti-Torture Law

first_imgColumnsCustodial Deaths : Revisiting Debate On Anti-Torture Law Mukund P Unny28 Jun 2020 8:10 PMShare This – xIndia’s anti-torture bill has been in coma for almost 10 years now.The custodial deaths of Jayaraj and Bennix at the Sathankulam police station in the Tuticorin District of Tamil Nadu have raised eye-brows due to the sheer scale of torture and violence perpetrated by the Police. This incident has opened up the debate on the use of third-degree methods by the Police to extract confessions and statements, even as the global anger following the death of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe custodial deaths of Jayaraj and Bennix at the Sathankulam police station in the Tuticorin District of Tamil Nadu have raised eye-brows due to the sheer scale of torture and violence perpetrated by the Police. This incident has opened up the debate on the use of third-degree methods by the Police to extract confessions and statements, even as the global anger following the death of George Floyd is far from dying down. In the United States, the protests against incidents of police brutality has now resulted in the House of Commons (Congress) passing a police reform bill seeking to ban chokeholds, establish a national database to track police misconduct etc. The reforms bill is unlikely to become a formal law as the bill in its present form faces the threat of being vetoed by President Trump. Interestingly, India also shares similar situation as that of the United States as the Indian anti-torture law, proposed many times by the Parliamentarians, is yet to the see the light of the day. Fate of the Prevention of Torture Bill, 2010 The global commitment to an anti-torture law is marked with the adoption of the “Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Being Subjected to Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment” (“the Torture Declaration”) by the General Assembly of United Nations on 09.12.1975. The Torture Declaration was followed by “The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment” (“the Torture Convention”) which was adopted by the General Assembly on 10.12.1984, almost 9 years after the Torture Declaration of 1975. The Torture Convention breathes into itself the Article 5 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 7 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, both of which provide that no one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. However, for the Torture Convention to be made applicable in India, India had to pass a law enabling the country to ratify the same. The Prevention of Torture Bill, 2010 was a step in that direction. This bill was introduced in the Lok Sabha on 26.04.2010 by then Home Minister P. Chidambaram and was passed on 06.05.2010. Salient features the Protection of Torture Bill, 2010 If the Prevention of Torture Bill, 2010 had indeed become law, it would have provided for punishment for torture committed by public servants. The Section 3 of the Bill defined “torture” broadly as follows: “3. Whoever, being a public servant or being abetted by a public servant or with the consent or acquiescence of a public servant, intentionally does any act for the purposes to obtain from him or a third person such information or a confession which causes,— (i) grievous hurt to any person; or (ii) danger to life, limb or health (whether mental or physical) of any person, is said to inflict torture: Provided that nothing contained in this section shall apply to any pain, hurt or danger as aforementioned caused by any act, which is inflicted in accordance with any procedure established by law or justified by law Explanation.—For the purposes of this section, ‘public servant’ shall, without prejudice to section 21 of the Indian Penal Code, also include any person acting in his official capacity under the Central Government or the State Government.” The Section 4 of the lapsed bill provided for 10 years punishment for the act of torture as defined above. It said that when torture is committed for gaining a confession or other information for detecting an offence, and if it is committed on certain grounds such as religion, race, language, caste, or any other ground, it shall entail punishment for “torture”. Significantly, the complaint has to be made by the victim of such torture within six months from the date on which the offence is alleged to have been committed. Further, it required that the prior sanction to prosecute the accused be taken from the concerned government. The Select Committee of the Rajya Sabha was of the opinion that “the definition of torture should be suitably expanded so as to make it consistent with the UN Convention and include offences under the Indian Penal Code. Torture of women and children should be given special consideration and attempt to torture should also be made an offence. The definition of public servant should include any government companies or institutions.” Even though the Bill was passed by the Lok Sabha, it did not sail past the Rajya Sabha. The Bill passed by the Lok Sabha was referred to a Select Committee of the Rajya Sabha which had recommended various amendments to the Bill but it soon lapsed when 15th Lok Sabha was dissolved. Intervention of the Supreme Court and the Law Commission Report When the world came to know of the custodial violence meted out to the Delhi University Professor G.N Saibaba, through an interview published by The Hindu on 08.04.2016, former Law Minister Dr. Ashwini Kumar decided to file a writ petition (WP(C) No. 738 of 2016) before the Supreme Court broadly praying for “ensuring an effective and purposeful legislative framework/ laws and its enforcement to fulfill the constitutional promise of human dignity and prevention of custodial torture”. The petitioner stated that the Prevention of Torture Bill, 2010 was already passed by the Lok Sabha and that the Torture Convention needs to be ratified by India through a legislative process. On 27.11.2017, the Supreme Court disposed of the writ petition on the basis of the statement of Attorney General Shri K.K Venugopal that the prayer made in the writ petition has been the subject matter of discussion in the Law Commission which has already made certain recommendations and that the report is being seriously considered by the Government. The Law Commission headed by Justice (Rtd) B.S Chauhan in its 273rd Report recommended the implementation of the Torture Convention by way of a new bill namely “The Prevention of Torture Bill, 2017”. The Law Commission recommended as follows: “While deciding on as to what amounts to torture by a public servant, the Commission has suggested definition of ‘torture’ wide enough to include inflicting injury, either intentionally or involuntarily, or even an attempt to cause such an injury, which will include physical, mental or psychological injury. The Commission went into the existing legal provisions and concluded that the Criminal Procedure Code, 1973 and the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 require amendments to accommodate provisions regarding compensation and burden of proof, respectively. Further, the Law Commission recommended amendment to Section 357B to incorporate payment of compensation, in addition to payment of fine, as provided under Section 326A or Section 376D of the Indian Penal Code,1860. The Commission also recommended that the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 required insertion of Section 114B to flag a presumption that in case a person in police custody sustains injuries, it is presumed that those injuries have been inflicted by the police, and the burden of proof shall lie on the authority concerned to explain such injury. In order to curb the menace of torture and to have a deterrent effect on acts of torture, the Law Commission recommended stringent punishment to the perpetrators of such acts. The new Bill to prevent torture was to provide for provisions where the Courts will decide upon a justiciable compensation after considering various facets of an individual case, such as nature, purpose, extent and manner of injury, including mental agony caused to the victim. However, the recommendations were not implemented by the Central Government by introducing the aforesaid amendments and the new law in the Parliament. Dr. Ashwini Kumar, the petitioner in the writ petition, filed an application (MA No. 2560 of 2018 in WP(C) No. 738 of 2016) before the Supreme Court with a prayer to implement the Law Commission recommendations which was dismissed by the Supreme Court on 05.09.2019 by a bench comprising of then Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi, Justice Dinesh Maheshwari and Justice Sanjiv Khanna. The Supreme Court rejected the prayer for issuance of a direction to the Centre to enact a stand-alone law against custodial torture by holding that the Court cannot direct the Parliament to enact laws.Jeyaraj-Bennix Custodial Deaths : Questions About Lapses Of Magistrate In Ordering Remand Present Status of the Anti-Torture Bill India’s anti-torture bill has been in coma for almost 10 years now. When the question regarding the implementation of the Law Commission recommendations was discussed in the Supreme Court, it was informed on 22.01.2019 by the Central Government through Attorney General that the draft Prevention of Torture Bill, 2017 was referred to all the States for their inputs and comments and that only 8 states/UTs had responded as on that date. Even after considerable time has elapsed from the date of Law Commission report, the Prevention of Torture Bill, 2017 has not even been introduced in the Houses of the Parliament. The Home Minister Amit Shah had on the occasion of 50th foundation day of the ‘Bureau of Police Research and Development (BPRD)’ mentioned that the age of third-degree torture was over. Perhaps the first step in that direction would be a timely introduction of the Prevention of Torture Bill, 2017 so that India can conform, finally, to its international commitment of eradicating torture from the policing system.(Author is a Delhi based Lawyer. He tweets at @eminentjurist and may be emailed at [email protected])Subscribe to LiveLaw and help us provide quality journalism. Click here to subscribe. Next Storylast_img read more

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