5 Jul
2021

2 UK shares to buy today in a Stocks & Shares ISA

first_img Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares See all posts by Conor Coyle Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. conorcoyle owns shares of Diageo. The Motley Fool UK has recommended B&M European Value and Diageo. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. 2 UK shares to buy today in a Stocks & Shares ISAcenter_img Conor Coyle | Monday, 15th February, 2021 | More on: BME DGE Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Images FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. The world is a very different place compared with this day one year ago. Covid-19 was spreading rapidly throughout Europe, but the alarm was relatively low in the UK.Fast-forward to today, and after several lockdowns and the UK economy shrinking a record 9.9% during 2020, many might think that opportunity in the stock market is limited.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…I still see a lot of value in buying UK shares in a Stocks and Shares ISA, though. A Stocks and Shares ISA allows me to invest my money in the stock market, rather than having it sit as cash in my bank account.UK citizens have an allowance of £20,000 for the tax year in which they can receive tax breaks. While there is more risk involved than in a Cash ISA, Stocks and Shares ISAs can be a good way to get started in the stock market.But what UK shares would I add to my ISA today? While the FTSE 100 is down in the last 12 months, I think these three companies could represent a buying opportunity.Bargain huntingOne UK share which seems to have benefited from the impact of the pandemic is B&M European Value Retail (LSE:BME). The discount store owner announced a special dividend payout of £200m in January, working out at 20p a share.That payout was in response to revenue growth of 22.5% in the group’s third quarter. The general retailer’s sales have surged since Covid-19 hit, as its shops remained open as an essential goods supplier. B&M has also seen sales increase as most of its stores operate in retail parks as opposed to town centres, which have been adversely affected.That said, the shares have already risen 48% over the last year and the risk is that they are close to their peak. B&M is also at risk from rising inflation as its margins can be hurt by distribution costs. I’d still buy B&M, however, as its outlook remains strong. I think budget retail is only like to improve as the financial fallout of Covid-19 continues. Spirited recoveryBeer and spirits maker Diageo (LSE:DGE) is another UK share I’d add to my Stocks and Shares ISA at the moment.While ongoing restrictions on the hospitality sector have had a major impact on sales of beer, Diageo’s spirit sales have gone up in key markets due to good off-trade performance.My feeling is that pubs and restaurants will start to creep open in the months ahead as the vaccine rollout gathers pace. I think this will ultimately return the Guinness owner to its pre-Covid-19 price of around 3,200p.There is a risk that further mutations of the virus could lead to further closures in 2020 and beyond. That could hurt the Diageo shares depending on the severity of the restrictions. For now I see enough upside from the current 3,035p price to add Diageo to my Stocks and Shares ISA.last_img read more

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23 Jun
2021

1 million fan milestone for Toulouse

first_imgThat took their overall total to 978,331 fans ahead of the return game against the leaders of the English Premiership and last season’s Amlin Challenge Cup champions. Four times Heineken Cup champions Toulouse will reach another tournament milestone this weekend when they become the first team to notch 1 million fans at their home matches in Europe’s premier club tournament.Guy Noves’ side were the inaugural winners of the competition and were also the first team to win the title three times. They were the first club to play 100 games and still lead the way with 121.Sunday’s Pool 6 clash with Harlequins at Le Stadium will be their 55th home game and, with more than 30,000 tickets already sold for the game, the turnstiles will tick through the 1,000,000 mark.At the end of last season Toulouse had clocked up 959,831 paying customers and they opened their home account in this the 17th season of Heineken Cup rugby with an 18,500 crowd at Stade Ernest-Wallon for their win over Gloucester Rugby in Round 1. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Toulouse became the first team this season to beat Quins with last weekend’s 21-10 at the Twickenham Stoop and the European giants will break another record on Sunday.“Toulouse have been setting the benchmark for clubs around Europe ever since they entered the Heineken Cup back in 1995. Where they have led, others have sought to follow,” said ERC Chief Executive, Derek McGrath. “Becoming the first team to attract 1 million fans is another significant milestone for Toulouse and I congratulate their teams both on and off the field for their continued success.”last_img read more

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19 Jun
2021

Apopka’s best kept secret?

first_img Revisit the area’s natural royaltyBy Charles TowneTravel back with me to another time, back to where you can gaze upon the wilderness as it appeared, little changed, for the last thousand years.Outdoorsy type or not this is a must see!Imagine that you are traveling down a gentle waterway in the wake of the Native Americans that lived here before the white man came. Listen to the call of the wild. Do you hear the cry of the great blue heron, or perhaps the raucous squawk of some wandering bittern? Or how about the drumming of that ancestor of the ivory-bill, the pileated woodpecker?Look over there, an otter, or perhaps our state’s dragon, the alligator.Be prepared, for you might see the occasional gray fox, bobcat or deer and if you are lucky and observe, you might see that old man of the forest, the black bear as he silently vanishes and you quietly propel your canoe downstream with the current.You might wet a line and try your hand, or hook, at catching some of the massive bass that calls these waters home. If you do, please practice catch and release so someone else may share your thrill.In places, you float over pure white sand in a foot of water as the foliage cascades down to the water’s edge. These sandy spots are perfect for lounging and are ready-made for young and old alike.By now I am sure you are wondering “what am I talking about?” Nothing other than that spot of Edenic beauty, Rock Springs Run, the upper portion of the wild and scenic Wekiva River.Bob Loomis, the owner of Kings Landing, is creating an enjoyable experience for all – young and old alike that must be seen to be fully appreciated for words alone can’t describe what he is doing for Central Florida.Shake Bob’s hand and commend him for a job well done.To reach King’s Landing travel north on Rock Springs Road out of Apopka until you come to Kelly Park Road. Turn right onto Kelly Park Road, and then turn left onto Baptist Camp Road. Go past Rock Springs Park, about 3/4 of a mile to the end of the road and you are there.The canoe hostlers will prepare your canoe and launch you on your way to adventure. Go downstream and follow the signs to the takeout just below the old “bridge to nowhere” and Loomis adventures will pick you up in their shuttle van and return you to your car.Oh yes, be sure to bring a camera, sunscreen, and a lunch and be prepared for an adventure that will restore years to your life. Mama Mia Please enter your comment! TAGSKings LandingWekiva River Previous articleCome to the Taste of Apopka and win a Takeout Waiter gift certificate from The Apopka VoiceNext articlePrescribed burn at Lake Apopka North Shore today Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 2 COMMENTS November 17, 2017 at 8:36 pm That is a nice video and I like the jungle music. The canoes with the keel down the middle are the best, as they don’t flip as easily. I think that is what you call that middle ridge, as well as I remember. Yes, nothing like paddling along row, row, rowing your boat, merrily on your way, and looking down in the clear water below, and seeing a huge red water snake almost as big as your leg lying on the bottom, only about four foot down or so right under you…..YIKES! I like to catch the little stumpknockers as you can see them run out, and go after the beetle spins, it is so clear. I like to watch the fish swim through the eel grass. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Reply How right you are Mama Mia. Excellent fishing, clear water, beautiful birds, dragons, lots of wildlife, wonderful environment, and it is invigorating to the spirit. Thanks for the comment. Chaz Reply charles towne You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here November 16, 2017 at 8:24 pm Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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16 Jun
2021

Red Nose Day total now at £63 million

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Red Nose Day total now at £63 million  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Comic Relief reports that this year’s Red Nose Day campaign has lived up to its billing as “The Big One” and has now raised £63,019,955.The charity announced its latest total to supporters and donors via email, letting them know how much more the 16 March 2007 event had raised. By the end of that night itself the total stood at £40,236,142.The message included a reminder about the different ways of paying money into the appeal for those who had collected money but not yet passed it on. Advertisementcenter_img Comic Relief expects the total to continue growing.The email update also included a message encouraging readers to support the Global Campaign for Education’s efforts to help the 80 million or so children around the world who do not have an opportunity to go to school. Howard Lake | 8 May 2007 | News Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Research / statisticslast_img read more

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16 Jun
2021

Official warning for Oxfam following Charity Commission investigation

first_img Melanie May | 11 June 2019 | News resourcing and capability around safeguarding at the charity between 2015 to 2017 did not match the risks associated with the charity’s global reach and the nature of its workthe charity’s approach to safeguarding case work was at times unstructured and a lack of adequate assurance and oversight mechanisms meant trustees were unable to identify serious failures in case handling, including poor record keeping, failings of which the inquiry is “extremely critical”weaknesses in the charity’s HR practices prior to 2018, particularly concerning problems around vetting and referencing and management oversight, led to a ‘culture of tolerance of poor behaviour’as late as 2017, promises that the resources for safeguarding would be increased were not deliveredHelen Stephenson, Chief Executive of the Charity Commission, said the regulator’s findings demonstrate that the incidents in Haiti were symptoms of a wider problem:“What went wrong in Haiti did not happen in isolation. Our inquiry demonstrates that, over a period of years, Oxfam’s internal culture tolerated poor behaviour, and at times lost sight of the values it stands for.“The charity’s leadership may have been well-intentioned. But our report demonstrates that good intentions have limited value when they are not matched with resources, robust systems and processes that are implemented on the ground, and more importantly, an organisational culture that prioritises keeping people safe.“I would like to thank the whistleblowers in this case, who took the courageous decision to come to us with their concerns. Their contribution has made, and will continue to make, an important difference.”Regulatory Direction under Section 84 of the Charities Act 2011This order directs Oxfam’s trustees to take specified actions including to submit an action plan for the Commission’s approval by 30 June 2019, which will set out the steps by which it will implement the outstanding actions and recommendations required by the Commission.Oxfam’s responseIn response to the report, Oxfam issued the following statement from Alison Talbot, Partner & Head of National Charities, Winckworth Sherwood, on behalf of former Oxfam GB trustees and senior executives:“The Charity Commission report has highlighted the seriousness and complexity of safeguarding issues facing Oxfam and other charities working in the aid sector. We hope that its findings will contribute to ongoing improvements in how Oxfam and the sector carry out their vital work to prevent abuse of staff, members of communities and beneficiaries.“As trustees and senior executives, those of us then in office were appalled when in 2011 we found out about the behaviour of some of Oxfam’s staff posted toHaiti. At the time, Oxfam was delivering water to half a million people in Haiti. These members of staff let Oxfam, and our beneficiaries, down badly. We apologise to all those affected.“In 2011, we acted immediately to ensure all of the allegations were urgently investigated by sending out an investigation team. The individuals suspected of breaching Oxfam’s code of conduct were suspended. Four employees were subsequently dismissed once the investigation was concluded, and this was publicised by Oxfam at the time.“We recognise that the Charity Commission has identified weaknesses in the handling of the events in Haiti. We implemented a detailed action plan to address the wider issues identified by the investigation both in Haiti, and across our international programmes. As trustees and senior executives at the time, we were determined to tackle sexual exploitation and abuse, and we established a number of programmes and initiatives to prevent and identify safeguarding issues.“Safeguarding is and remains a huge issue for all charities, and the Commission has pointed out the need for greater resource, more rigorous investigatory procedures, and senior oversight and accountability. We recognise today that our efforts in 2011 and subsequently were insufficient, especially in the light of all of the information available to the Charity Commission in the course of this statutory inquiry.“Safeguarding is fundamental to what Oxfam and other humanitarian agencies have to do. Those caught up in humanitarian disasters must trust the agencies which are there to help them, upon whom their lives may depend. They should be kept safe from all and any abuses.” The Charity Commission has issued Oxfam with an Official Warning and a regulatory Direction under Section 84 of the Charities Act 2011, following its investigation into the charity.The Commission has today published the results of its investigation into Oxfam in a critical report, finding that aspects of the charity’s past record on safeguarding amount to mismanagement. The investigation found that it repeatedly fell below standards expected, had a culture of tolerating poor behaviour, and failed to meet promises made on safeguarding.It also finds that it failed to heed warnings, including from its own staff, that its culture and response around keeping people safe was inadequate, and made commitments to safeguarding that were not matched by its actions.The report takes into account over 7,000 items of evidence and examines the charity’s handling of events in Haiti, as well as its more recent record on protecting people, including its beneficiaries, volunteers and staff, from harm.Haiti misconduct allegationsThe regulator finds that the then executive of Oxfam GB mishandled aspects of its response to allegations of misconduct in Haiti in 2011.Overall, the Commission concludes that there had been a “culture of poor behaviour” and poor accountability among staff in Haiti at the time, of which individuals took advantage.The Commission also finds that the charity’s reports to donors and the Commission itself were “not as full and frank about the nature and seriousness of the incidents and problems in Haiti as they should have been”. The inquiry’s view is that Oxfam GB’s approach to disclosure and reporting was marked, at times, by a desire to protect the charity’s reputation and donor relationships.Specifically, the inquiry found that the charity:did not adequately follow-up whether victims of sexual misconduct in Haiti were minorsdid not report allegations of child abuse by Oxfam GB staff in Haiti, failing to take the risks to alleged victims seriously enoughdealt with staff members implicated in sexual misconduct in Haiti inconsistently, notably by appearing to treat senior staff more leniently than junior staffmissed opportunities to identify and tackle early warnings before the events in Haiti in 2011Oxfam’s wider approach to safeguardingThe investigation also examined Oxfam GB’s wider approach to safeguarding, both historically and more recently, with the report concluding that the charity’s own commitments and promises in the past were not always matched by its actions.It attributes this to its leadership, up to 2018, which it says, applyed insufficient resources to keeping people safe from harm, and concludes that this and other systemic weaknesses amount to mismanagement in the administration of charity.The inquiry also finds the charity missed opportunities to address issues raised by its own safeguarding staff, and exposed the charity to undue risk.Specifically, the inquiry finds that: Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Tagged with: Charity Commission governance Oxfam trust  789 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14  788 total views,  2 views today Official warning for Oxfam following Charity Commission investigationlast_img read more

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12 Jun
2021

Flowing Electrons Help Ocean Microbes Gulp Methane

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Science and Technology Flowing Electrons Help Ocean Microbes Gulp Methane By JESSICA STOLLER-CONRAD Published on Friday, September 18, 2015 | 11:20 am Electron microscopy (left), and nanoSIMS analyses (right) of slices of individual microbial consortia allowed for unambiguous identification and analysis of thousands of individual cells. nanoSIMS images such as this one give a quantitative picture of the isotopic composition of each cell, and in turn, a measure of each cell’s biosynthetic activity in relationship to each cell’s neighbors. Credit: Shawn McGlynn/CaltechGood communication is crucial to any relationship, especially when partners are separated by distance. This also holds true for microbes in the deep sea that need to work together to consume large amounts of methane released from vents on the ocean floor. Recent work at Caltech has shown that these microbial partners can still accomplish this task, even when not in direct contact with one another, by using electrons to share energy over long distances.This is the first time that direct interspecies electron transport—the movement of electrons from a cell, through the external environment, to another cell type—has been documented in microorganisms in nature.The results were published in the September 16 issue of the journal Nature.“Our lab is interested in microbial communities in the environment and, specifically, the symbiosis—or mutually beneficial relationship—between microorganisms that allows them to catalyze reactions they wouldn’t be able to do on their own,” says Professor of Geobiology Victoria Orphan, who led the recent study. For the last two decades, Orphan’s lab has focused on the relationship between a species of bacteria and a species of archaea that live in symbiotic aggregates, or consortia, within deep-sea methane seeps. The organisms work together in syntrophy (which means “feeding together”) to consume up to 80 percent of methane emitted from the ocean floor—methane that might otherwise end up contributing to climate change as a greenhouse gas in our atmosphere.Previously, Orphan and her colleagues contributed to the discovery of this microbial symbiosis, a cooperative partnership between methane-oxidizing archaea called anaerobic methanotrophs (or “methane eaters”) and a sulfate-reducing bacterium (organisms that can “breathe” sulfate instead of oxygen) that allows these organisms to consume methane using sulfate from seawater. However, it was unclear how these cells share energy and interact within the symbiosis to perform this task.Because these microorganisms grow slowly (reproducing only four times per year) and live in close contact with each other, it has been difficult for researchers to isolate them from the environment to grow them in the lab. So, the Caltech team used a research submersible, called Alvin, to collect samples containing the methane-oxidizing microbial consortia from deep-ocean methane seep sediments and then brought them back to the laboratory for analysis.The researchers used different fluorescent DNA stains to mark the two types of microbes and view their spatial orientation in consortia. In some consortia, Orphan and her colleagues found the bacterial and archaeal cells were well mixed, while in other consortia, cells of the same type were clustered into separate areas.Orphan and her team wondered if the variation in the spatial organization of the bacteria and archaea within these consortia influenced their cellular activity and their ability to cooperatively consume methane. To find out, they applied a stable isotope “tracer” to evaluate the metabolic activity. The amount of the isotope taken up by individual archaeal and bacterial cells within their microbial “neighborhoods” in each consortia was then measured with a high-resolution instrument called nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) at Caltech. This allowed the researchers to determine how active the archaeal and bacterial partners were relative to their distance to one another.To their surprise, the researchers found that the spatial arrangement of the cells in consortia had no influence on their activity. “Since this is a syntrophic relationship, we would have thought the cells at the interface—where the bacteria are directly contacting the archaea—would be more active, but we don’t really see an obvious trend. What is really notable is that there are cells that are many cell lengths away from their nearest partner that are still active,” Orphan says.To find out how the bacteria and archaea were partnering, co-first authors Grayson Chadwick (BS ’11), a graduate student in geobiology at Caltech and a former undergraduate researcher in Orphan’s lab, and Shawn McGlynn, a former postdoctoral scholar, employed spatial statistics to look for patterns in cellular activity for multiple consortia with different cell arrangements. They found that populations of syntrophic archaea and bacteria in consortia had similar levels of metabolic activity; when one population had high activity, the associated partner microorganisms were also equally active—consistent with a beneficial symbiosis. However, a close look at the spatial organization of the cells revealed that no particular arrangement of the two types of organisms—whether evenly dispersed or in separate groups—was correlated with a cell’s activity.To determine how these metabolic interactions were taking place even over relatively long distances, postdoctoral scholar and coauthor Chris Kempes, a visitor in computing and mathematical sciences, modeled the predicted relationship between cellular activity and distance between syntrophic partners that are dependent on the molecular diffusion of a substrate. He found that conventional metabolites—molecules previously predicted to be involved in this syntrophic consumption of methane—such as hydrogen—were inconsistent with the spatial activity patterns observed in the data. However, revised models indicated that electrons could likely make the trip from cell to cell across greater distances.“Chris came up with a generalized model for the methane-oxidizing syntrophy based on direct electron transfer, and these model results were a better match to our empirical data,” Orphan says. “This pointed to the possibility that these archaea were directly transferring electrons derived from methane to the outside of the cell, and those electrons were being passed to the bacteria directly.”Guided by this information, Chadwick and McGlynn looked for independent evidence to support the possibility of direct interspecies electron transfer. Cultured bacteria, such as those from the genus Geobacter, are model organisms for the direct electron transfer process. These bacteria use large proteins, called multi-heme cytochromes, on their outer surface that act as conductive “wires” for the transport of electrons.Using genome analysis—along with transmission electron microscopy and a stain that reacts with these multi-heme cytochromes—the researchers showed that these conductive proteins were also present on the outer surface of the archaea they were studying. And that finding, Orphan says, can explain why the spatial arrangement of the syntrophic partners does not seem to affect their relationship or activity.“It’s really one of the first examples of direct interspecies electron transfer occurring between uncultured microorganisms in the environment. Our hunch is that this is going to be more common than is currently recognized,” she says.Orphan notes that the information they have learned about this relationship will help to expand how researchers think about interspecies microbial interactions in nature. In addition, the microscale stable isotope approach used in the current study can be used to evaluate interspecies electron transport and other forms of microbial symbiosis occurring in the environment.These results were published in a paper titled, “Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.” The work was funded by the Department of Energy Division of Biological and Environmental Research and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Marine Microbiology Initiative. First Heatwave Expected Next Week HerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Female Fashion Trends That Guys Can’t StandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business Newscenter_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment Top of the News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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4 Jun
2021

UL Hospitals Group announces gradual relaxation of access restrictions at maternity…

first_imgLimerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Advertisement Print RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash WhatsApp TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostUL Hospitals GroupUniversity Maternity Hospital Limerick NewsHealthLimerickUL Hospitals Group announces gradual relaxation of access restrictions at maternity hospitalBy Sarah Carr – April 23, 2021 226 WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads center_img Facebook Twitter Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Email Previous articleLimerick customers to benefit from extension of Irish Water’s First Fix free scheme to tackle leaksNext article€6.5m for ground-breaking projects in Limerick under Disruptive Technologies Fund Sarah Carrhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin University Maternity Hospital LimerickUL Hospitals Group is pleased to announce the gradual relaxation of a number of COVID-19 restrictions on access to University Maternity Hospital Limerick (UMHL), as local transmission of COVID-19 decreases and the vaccination programme rolls out across the Mid-West.The option of having a nominated partner present for anomaly scans has been reintroduced at the hospital this week, and from next Monday, April 26th fathers/parents of babies in the neonatal unit will be permitted to visit, 4.30pm-6.30pm, subject to activity in the unit.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Weekly risk assessment is ongoing at the hospital with a view to giving a nominated partner 45-minute visiting slots on the hospital’s postnatal wards, M1 and M2, from May 10th 2020 between the hours of 6pm and 8pm daily.Eileen Ronan, UL Hospitals Group’s Director of Midwifery, welcomed the hospital’s first steps in the careful, phased relaxation of the visiting restrictions that have been in force at UMHL for almost the entirety of the pandemic.“No-one could minimise the impact these restrictions have had on women using our services, their partners and loved ones. The restrictions run counter to the spirit of joy and happiness traditionally associated with pregnancy and the arrival of new-born babies, and we are delighted to be in a position where we can safely permit circumstances that allow parents and their children closer contact at this most important time in their lives,” Ms Ronan said“While these restrictions have been difficult, they have been necessary, and effective. During the surge of cases in the earlier part of the year, it was more important than ever to safeguard the health of mothers and babies and our staff. We are grateful for the cooperation of our patients and their families and the broader community. Thanks to their sacrifices, they ensured there was no outbreak of COVID-19 in UMHL, with all the dangers that would have created for specialist maternity staff, young babies, and mothers and mums-to-be,” Ms Ronan added.In taking the decision to implement or relax restrictions, UMHL, like all maternity hospitals, has regard to three primary factors: the rate of COVID transmission within the local community, the number of staff in the hospital and the possibility of those staff becoming unwell, and the infrastructure of the hospital site.UMHL is acting in accordance with the advice of the National Women and Infant’s Health Programme, whose clinical director Dr Peter McKenna earlier this week expressed hope that the decrease in community transmission, allied with immunisation of hospital staff, would enable the country’s maternity hospitals to relax access restrictions over the coming weeks.Meanwhile, visiting on the basis of compassion grounds will continue to be facilitated, as it has been throughout the pandemic. Birthing partners will also continue to be supported in attending the Labour Ward and Theatre.All nominated partners must adhere to the wearing of face masks, observe hand hygiene and social distancing. Temperature monitoring is in place at the main reception, along with the completion of a COVID-19 screening questionnaire.The measures are subject to change, and hospital management will continue to review the situation on a weekly basis, to plan for the safe, controlled and phased relaxation of restrictions, and to ensure all processes are safely introduced and managed.last_img read more

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9 May
2021

Numerical simulations of the ice flow dynamics of the Brunt Ice Shelf – Stancomb Wills Ice Tongue System

first_imgIce shelves play an important role in determining regional ocean properties and in modulating ice flux fromland to sea. Their dynamics are complex, however, and localised rifts and zones of weakness can have asignificant but poorly understood effect on flow and ultimately on the integrity of the shelf.The Brunt Ice Shelf (BIS)- Stancomb Wills Ice Tongue (SWIT) System, situated on the Caird Coast, OatesLand, Antarctica, is characterised as a thin, unbounded ice shelf with a highly heterogeneous structure. Incontrast to most ice shelves, icebergs calve along much of the grounding line but are trapped and subsequentlybound together by sea ice. This calf-ice / sea-ice aggregate makes up a large part of the Brunt Ice Shelf inparticular, and this heterogeneity makes the BIS-SWIT a good test case for investigating the importance ofweak zones in shelf dynamics.We applied a diagnostic, dynamic/thermodynamic ice-shelf model to simulate the present flow of the iceshelf that results from the ice-thickness distribution, the influx at the grounding line and the surface andbottom temperature. We then compared the model results with flow velocities measured by SyntheticAperture Radar feature tracking. We found that our simulations were clearly improved by the use of ahigh- resolution ice thickness distribution on the heterogeneous ice shelf calculated from ICESat surfaceelevation data using an assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. We then assessed the model’s sensitivity toice thickness, inflow velocities and a flow enhancement factor that parameterises the role of sea ice, whosemechanical properties are known to be significantly different from those of meteoric ice.We found that the numerical simulations were improved by incorporating the detailed variations in shelfstructure. Simulated flow velocities on either side of rifts in the ice shelf became decoupled as we softenedthe sea ice within the rifts. On a larger scale, we found that soft sea ice can lead to a decoupling of themovement of the Stancomb-Wills Ice Tongue and the Brunt Ice Shelf. When we simulated a regime wheresea ice was absent, ice shelf flow speeds increased along the western edge of the SWIT ice front, in generalagreement with observations made in just such a sea- ice-free dynamic regime that occurred inlast_img read more

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2 Mar
2021

Turkuaz Announces Two-Night NYE Run With Moon Hooch, Kung Fu & West End Blend

first_imgIt’s a funky New Year’s celebration! On December 30-31, Turkuaz will keep up the tradition and celebrate NYE with their annual The Ball Drop show. Coming to the Fete Ballroom in Providence, RI, Turkuaz has put together a truly fun lineup for the two nights of music that will certainly keep you dancing through the end of 2016.The show features Turkuaz playing both nights, with support from Moon Hooch on night one and from both Kung Fu and West End Blend on night two. After a truly successful year that saw the band play at festivals nationwide, this is sure to be a celebration in the truest sense of the word.For tickets and more information, head here. Enter to win tickets & more below.last_img

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1 Mar
2021

New hope for imperiled children

first_imgAn estimated 2.4 million children in the world are exploited sexually, and 300,000 are child soldiers. Millions more children toil in virtual slavery in private homes, in agricultural fields, in mines, and on fishing boats.Those dismal statistics are an indication that the global system of child protection isn’t working. But François-Xavier Bagnoud (FXB) Center for Health and Human Rights of the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), together with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), is working to fix it.“It really is a broken system,” said Jennifer Leaning, the François Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights and FXB Center director.To help address the problem, the FXB Center is creating a suite of five classes focused on child protection as part of the curriculum for HSPH’s master’s degree in public health. Led by Leaning and Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB Center research director and professor of the practice of health and human rights, the program will be a sub-concentration in the public health program situated in the Humanitarian Academy, which offers courses in disaster response.The program will be one of the first interdisciplinary graduate programs in child protection and will train a new generation of leaders in the field. It also will begin to build a foundation of research and teaching to strengthen the theory and policy of child protection.Though the courses will be open to students at HSPH, a key element of the program will involve building leadership skills among experienced practitioners in developing nations. To foster their growth, the program will offer scholarships to three mid-career child protection professionals from nations in “the global south.”Two of the courses will launch next spring, and all five will be in place by fall 2014. The program was designed in collaboration with UNICEF, with that agency’s chief of child protection, Susan Bissell, providing important impetus, Bhabha said. Bissell contacted the FXB Center two years ago out of a belief that the field needed a stronger academic and research foundation. Leaning and Bhabha agreed.The courses will cover: management, budgeting, and administration; gender and reproductive rights; juvenile justice; human rights and child protection; and children as émigrés and refugees, fleeing wars and disasters. The program has an international advisory committee, co-chaired by Bissell and HSPH Dean Julio Frenk.The program’s initial development, as well as the three scholarships, have been financed by an anonymous donor, Leaning said. Additional development is planned. Within two years, Leaning hopes to offer the curriculum to other universities, especially those in developing nations. Faculty will develop online versions of the courses, which could be offered through the collaborative online course initiative edX. Students at universities around the world would be able to watch lectures created at Harvard, and then discuss issues raised with their local instructors.The problem the courses aim to address is enormous. It is global and involves populations both in developing and unstable nations, where trafficking is known to occur, and in stable, industrialized countries, where it takes place under the radar. The concern also includes populations that are institutionalized, such as children in group homes or prisons.Some children labor in mining or agriculture. Others are domestic servants, or even prostitutes. The problem among the refugee community alone is enormous, Leaning said. There are 40 million refugees and internally displaced people in the world, 80 percent of them women and children. Many were displaced years or even decades ago, and, unable to go home, have lived in refugee camps in host countries unwilling to accept them as permanent residents.Unable to earn a living, families become mired in poverty and dependent on aid, their children at risk for exploitation.“They’re gravely impoverished and dependent on humanitarian aid,” Bhabha said. “Families become desperate.”last_img read more

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