3 May
2021

Indiana State Police Grateful for Donation of 15 Automatic External Defibrillators from IU Health

first_imgToday Indiana University Health jumpstarted registration for the 5th Annual Bolt for the Heart 5K Family Thanksgiving Run with a donation of 15 Automatic External Defibrillators (AED). The AEDs were presented to the Bolt for the Heart Foundation and the Indiana State Police (ISP) during a press conference at IU Health North Hospital. IU Health sponsors the annual Bolt for the Heart run, which has placed 60 AEDs in State user28471-1475075974-media2_614a2e_240_160_prsme_ user28471-1475075975-media3_65431c_240_160_prsme_Police cruisers in the more rural parts of Indiana.“More than 300,000 people experience a life threatening cardiac rhythm outside of a hospital setting each year and less than 8 percent survive,” says Mary Baker, Vice President of Cardiovascular Services for IU Health. “For every minute that passes without action, an individual’s survival drops by 10 percent.”Often, the first person to respond to a 911 call is the Indiana State Police.  IU Health is committed to providing the ISP access to automatic external defibrillators for the treatment of sudden cardiac death across Indiana.In 2015, the Board of Directors of Bolt for the Heart identified the ISP as the ‘primary benefactor’ to continue receiving AED’s until every state police patrol car is equipped with this life saving device. To date, Bolt for the Heart has donate 60 AED’s to the Indiana State Police, which have been placed in more rural parts of Indiana where a state police officer could be the first to arrive at a medical emergency.Also present at the press conference was Superintendent Douglas G. Carter, Superintendent of the Indiana State Police; Jonathan Goble, President of IU Heath’s North Central Region, Pierre Twer, President of Bolt for the Heart and the Rhoad Family.Danny Rhoad, age 13, was saved by an AED that had been placed at Grand Park in Westfield, Ind. While playing in a ballgame in May of this year, Danny suffered SCA after being hit in the chest by a thrown ball. Coaches ran to one of the park’s concessions stands to grab an AED and used the defibrillator to restore Danny’s heartbeat.Each year sudden cardiac arrest claims the lives 335,000 people, like Danny, without warning. If the first person on the scene knew CPR and applied an AED within 5 minutes, the American Heart Association estimates that at least 40,000 more lives per year could be saved.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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3 May
2021

Top 10 Legal Stories Of 2017 Focus On Law Schools, Court Changes

first_imgExperts including former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard have sounded alarms for years about a looming crisis in legal education. The crisis hit home — hard — in Indiana in 2017.The closing of 4-year-old Indiana Tech Law School in Fort Wayne, and the revelation that 138-year-old Valparaiso University Law School faced an uncertain future, made law school troubles the top legal news story of 2017, as determined by the staff of Indiana Lawyer.While the fate of two Indiana law schools was the runaway choice for the year’s top news, many of the rest of the year’s top stories were close in staff balloting. Big news from federal and state courts as well as significant developments in the legal community and legislature were among IL’s top legal news stories of 2017.Here are the Top 10 IL legal news stories for 2017, as well as those stories our staff singled out as worthy of inclusion in this Year in Review edition.Law School Troubles Hit HomeIndiana Tech Law School closed its doors in June, disillusioning some students who believed the upstart had not been given enough time. Citing a $20 million loss and student admissions that never amounted to what the institution had expected, Indiana Tech announced last year it would close the Fort Wayne campus, so its shuttering was not unexpected.More stunning were developments this year at Valparaiso University Law School. Valpo, which had been under censure from the American Bar Association for noncompliance with admissions standards, announced in August an incoming first-year class of just 28 students. The Class of 2020 was 73 percent smaller than the Class of 2019, though Valpo’s new 1L class boasted the highest LSAT scores and GPAs in years.The ABA lifted its censure of Valpo in November, but that same month, the law school made another startling announcement. Due to “severe financial challenges,” the school said, no first-year students would be admitted in 2018. While insisting Valpo Law isn’t closing, university president Mark Heckler said the law school will be “exploring the full range of possibilities,” which could include affiliation with another law school or geographic relocation.As for Indiana Tech, the ABA withdrew its provisional accreditation in October.Personal, Professional Losses In Federal CourtKind, compassionate, focused, smart, talented, dedicated. Those are some of the words friends and colleagues used to describe Magistrate Judge Denise K. LaRue, 59, who died Aug. 2 after a battle with cancer.Brilliant, gregarious, funny, without equal, one-of-a-kind. That’s how Senior Judge Larry McKinney was remembered after he died just 49 days later, at age 73.The sudden losses of such experienced, hard-working, and well-liked jurists would hit any court hard, but the impact of the personal toll on the “federal family” of the District Court for the Southern District of Indiana was just part of the story. Already one of the busiest district courts in the nation, the court has operated for years under judicial emergency conditions, meaning judges handle an average of more than 600 cases each. LaRue’s and McKinney’s deaths led to the emergency lending of judges from district courts in Northern Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin to help keep cases moving.But the court will never be the same. Chief Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson called McKinney’s death “a crushing blow” after LaRue’s passing.Of LaRue, the chief judge said, “Her loss to the members of the court is a permanent one.”Goff Succeeds Rucker on Supreme CourtAfter a pool of 20 applicants was narrowed to three finalists, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb selected a small-town judge as his first appellate court appointment when he named Wabash Superior Judge Christopher Goff to the Indiana Supreme Court. “Judge Goff is deeply devoted to the cause of justice, and his sharp legal mind has been honed by years of practical experience,” Holcomb said in announcing his choice on June 12.Goff succeeds Justice Robert Rucker, who had been the court’s only African-American jurist and the last justice on the court to have been appointed by a Democratic governor. Rucker retired this year after 26 years on the bench. Goff’s appointment is the last in a complete turnover of the five justices of the Indiana Supreme Court that began with Justice Steven David’s appointment in 2010.“I think that if you make a decision to do public service, it’s important to do public service at the highest level that you can do it,” Goff said. “I was humbled to be considered in this process, and it’s been the thrill of my great professional career and my life serving in the Indiana judiciary.”Rucker, 70, departed the court in May. “Having been afforded the opportunity to serve the people of the state of Indiana for more than a quarter of a century has been an honor beyond measure,” he said.Ruling Leaves State Without Means Of ExecutionsCapital punishment by lethal injection is the statutory method of execution in Indiana, but an Indiana Court of Appeals ruling now under review by the Indiana Supreme Court put a temporary halt to the state’s ability to carry out a death sentence.Condemned killer Roy Lee Ward sued the Department of Correction after it changed the drugs used in lethal injection and announced the new formulation. The means of execution had not been adopted using public hearings or soliciting comment as required under the Administrative Rules and Procedure Act, the COA ruled in June. Judge John Baker wrote for the panel that the DOC’s current means of lethal injection was therefore “void and without effect.”The state appealed, arguing that adherence to APRA has never been required of the DOC in establishing a means of execution. Ward argued, and the COA agreed, that because DOC had not been specifically exempted from complying with the administrative law statute, it is bound by its terms. The Indiana Supreme Court heard oral arguments in September, but its decision had not been handed down by IL deadline. None of the dozen people on Indiana’s death row currently have a scheduled execution date.Notre Dame Law’s Barrett appointed to 7th CircuitUniversity of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in November after Senate hearings that were marked by a pitched partisan fight over the role of religion in a judge’s decision-making.Nominated by President Donald Trump to succeed retired Circuit Judge John Tinder, Barrett was confirmed 55-43. She gained the support of Indiana Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly and other Democrats who distanced themselves from questions raised during her confirmation hearing about her past academic writings concerning the role religion should play for judges. Critics blasted the questioning as anti-Catholic. After the smoke of the confirmation fight cleared, Barrett joined the court Nov. 10.Barrett’s wasn’t the only high-profile controversy involving the 7th Circuit. Renowned and acerbic Judge Richard Posner, 78, retired from the court without notice in September. In exiting, he blasted a court he said had become “highly politicized” and dismissive of pro se litigants, among other complaints.Merit Selection Comes To IndianapolisMarion Superior judges will be reapplying for their jobs, in a sense, after the Indiana General Assembly this year passed a law establishing a unique form of merit selection for the Indianapolis judiciary. Marion County joins Allen, Lake and St. Joseph as the only Indiana counties where judges are vetted by a commission that recommends nominees for a governor’s appointment.But the Marion County Judicial Nominating Commission is far different from those in other counties: it’s larger with more expansive duties. Not only will the 14-member panel nominate judges to fill vacancies, it also will recommend to the public whether judges currently in office should be retained, according to the statute. Voters then will have a yes-or-no choice of whether judges who seek another term will be retained.The transition to this new system was anything but smooth. The Urban League, African-American lawmakers and community leaders condemned the proposal at the Statehouse. They claimed the system was discriminatory, pointing out that Indiana voters elect their judges in every county except those with the highest percentage of African-Americans. While opponents vowed to challenge the system, the commission had its first meeting in November, and no court challenges have been filed to date.Key LGBT Workplace RulingThe full 7th Circuit Court of Appeals became the first in the nation to extend workplace protections to include discrimination based on sexual orientation. The landmark en banc decision in Kimberly Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, 15-1720, created a split amont circuits on the issue. The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals reached the opposite conclusion, ruling Title VII of the Civil Rights Act doesn’t bar workplace discrimination against gays and lesbians.Kimberly Hively, a math teacher who initially brought a pro se discrimination complaint against Ivy Tech, claimed she was repeatedly passed over for full-time employment and promotions and eventually fired because she is a lesbian. In April, the 7th Circuit in an 8-3 decision held that Hively could proceed with her suit, holding that Title VII applies to discrimination based on sexual orientation.After the case was remanded to the District Court for the Northern District of Indiana, Hively and Ivy Tech agreed to enter mediation in the dispute. An attorney who represented Hively applauded her bravery for bringing the case. “She changed the world,” said Gregory Nevins of Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund.Marion County Sued Over Early VotingMarion County has provided just one location for early voting since 2010 after expanding early voting in 2008. Common Cause and the NACCP contend in a lawsuit filed in May that the situation in Indianapolis bars equal access to the ballot box, particularly for minority voters.Other Indiana counties have expanded in-person early voting through satellite-voting locations open prior to Election Day. “It’s shameful that the largest county in our state only has one early voting site,” said Indiana NAACP President Barbara Bolling-Williams. Plaintiffs also challenged as unconstitutional a state law that allows one of three county election board members to veto satellite voting.Former Republican Marion County Election Board member Maura Hoff blocked satellite voting, the suit says, meaning all early voting took place only at the City-County Building. The suit claims this created excessive lines and long waits, depriving voters of an equal opportunity to cast an early ballot, and suppressing turnout. The case is pending in the District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.Courts Struggle To Deal With OpioidsAcross Indiana, the human toll of the nation’s opioid epidemic increasingly has become a daily fact of life for judges, lawyers, and the innocent victims — the children of addicts who often become children in need of services. The number of CHINS cases continued to skyrocket in juvenile courts in 2017.Meanwhile, prosecutors, lawmakers and members of the judiciary debated whether the solution to the opioid epidemic lie in more money for drug treatment or funding for tougher law enforcement. Some cities, though — including Hammond and Indianapolis — sued drug companies and distributors over the societal costs.Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush in September was tapped to co-chair a national judicial task force looking at what can be done to address the problem, especially as it relates to impacts on children.Trump Travel Ban Vexes Immigrants, AttorneysAfter President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday, January 27, restricting travel from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yeman, Indiana immigration attorneys were flooded with calls from panicked immigrants uncertain how the order would affect them.“It’s kind of chaotic at this point,” one Indianapolis immigration attorney said the following Monday, after a weekend dominated by news of pandemonium and protests at airports. Courts eventually blocked Trump’s initial travel ban, and a revised travel ban that also includes nations such as North Korea and Chad has had mixed results overcoming court scrutiny.The Supreme Court allowed a revised travel bans to take effect in December.In addition to the year’s Top 10 legal news stories, IL staff members also selected these stories as some of the year’s most significant:Bar exam blues: Fewer than half the law school graduates who sat for the February 2017 Indiana Bar Exam passed — a troubling development that some observers feared might be a new normal. The 48 percent passage rate for the February exam was the lowest since 2002. Pass rates for the July 2017 bar exam, meanwhile, were relatively unchanged — 73 percent passed, a 1-percentage-point increase over the July 2016 results.IndianaPOLIS Criminal Justice Center: Indianapolis mayor Joe Hogsett in January announced plans for a new criminal justice center in the Twin-Aire neighborhood of the Circle City. The proposed facility southeast of downtown would combine courts, a new jail and other judicial functions with an emphasis on substance abuse and mental health treatment and services for offenders.Staggering settlement: The state of Indiana agreed to pay $25 million to settle a northern Indiana family’s $31 million judgment against the Department of Child Services for its abuses in prosecuting parents based on falsified claims of child abuse. The settlement was by far the largest lump sum ever paid from the Indiana Tort Claims Fund.Another round of alcohol debate: Lawmakers continued to study changes in Indiana’s alcohol laws that could include Sunday sales, among others. Ricker’s found a loophole that allowed it to sell cold beer in some convenience stores. Monarch Beverage again turned to court, where it unsuccessfully continued to wage lawsuits seeking to permit it to distribute liquor as well as beer and wine. A legislative panel made recommendations that will be considered in 2018.Gun laws: The Indiana General Assembly heard from advocates and opponents of so-called “constitutional carry,” which would permit any eligible person to carry a concealed weapon without a license. The proposal is likely to be a hot topic in the 2018 session. Lawmakers last year also passed a bill allowing Statehouse staff to carry guns.State whistleblowers, beware: The Indiana Supreme Court ruled that state employees are not covered by Indiana’s whistleblower law. Justices ruled 4-1 in a case brought by fired Indiana Department of Environmental Management employee Sue Esserman, who alleged she was fired in retaliation for questioning claims that the department paid from its Excess Liability Trust Fund.• December 27, 2017Dave Stafford for TheIndianaLawyer FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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2 May
2021

Buddy Baseball begins May 4

first_imgThe Division of Recreation Special Needs Baseball League,  “Buddy Baseball,” is set to open up its fifth season on May 4. Buddy Baseball has been an amazing success and we have a lot planned for opening day – a “kick-off” breakfast for all the players and families, followed by our parade, opening ceremonies on the field and then the games.  The “kick-off” breakfast will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the Bayonne Museum located, 229 Broadway, the corner of 9th Street. After breakfast, we will then march from 9th Street to 11th Street on Broadway and make the turn up 11th Street to the field. We will then have our opening ceremony followed by three games.We are very excited for this upcoming season. With over seventy-five children and six teams, it will be a great experience for everyone.last_img read more

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21 Apr
2021

In the BB archives

first_imgA baker who had a better idea of the value of empty flour sacks than he had of the ethics of stealing was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment at Darlaston. He went to the bakehouse of a neighbour and wanted to buy 21 flour sacks, the value of which was seven shillings. The owner did not wish to sell them, and the prisoner went away, but afterwards, he was seen carrying the sacks from the premises. He was followed to a public house and, when charged with taking them, he expressed surprise that he should be charged with stealing, as the constable had recovered them. His plea, which did not obviate his imprisonment, was that he had been drinking and he did not know what he was doing.last_img

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21 Apr
2021

Holding the fort

first_imgWhen Starbucks’ new UK MD Kris Engskov met staff at head office last month (July) he described the UK as “one of the most dynamic markets in the world for us”.The 39-year-old former aide to Clinton has been brought in to “continue the momentum Starbucks has achieved in this region”, according to Starbucks. Indeed, Starbucks does seem to be picking up the pace again in the UK. A three-year global turnaround programme nears completion this year, following a troubled period for the US coffee giant in 2008. Latest figures show it added 24 outlets over the last half year to the end of June 2011, and now has 730 UK outlets.However, as the company revealed third-quarter results at the end of July this year, it was careful to point out that expansion would continue only at a “measured pace”. Indeed, as British Baker unveils its BB75 league table half-year update, it is clear that new store openings among the BB75 are holding up, despite tough economic trading conditions.The half-year update shows that the Top 10 names, the largely corporate end of the BB75 league table, have all stayed in the same positions as at the start of the year, opening over 180 outlets between them. This compares with 247 openings at the halfway point in 2010.The year 2011 is about holding the fort in the face of tough conditions on the high street. But there is an exception as coffee chain Costa continues to steam ahead with expansion. It now has nearly double the number of stores as Starbucks in the UK, adding 82 this half year. The chain, which operates in 25 countries worldwide, is at number three in the UK and could not be more upbeat.In March 2011 the company announced the acquisition of Coffee Nation for £59.5m and it has a new vending brand, Costa Express, targeting the self-serve coffee bar sector. It has set a target of a massive 3,000 Costa Express units across the UK over the next five years.Moreover, Costa’s loyalty programme, the Coffee Club card is now used in 41% of all transactions, and provides data on over 1.2 million active cardholders, offering valuable demographic information and promotional opportunities, it says.Despite Costa’s growth trajectory, Greggs remains safely ahead in pole position on the BB75 league, although latest profits suffered from rising commodity prices. It has opened 39 net new shops so far this year and is on track to add a total of approximately 80 net new shops in the course of 2011. The current property market conditions have increased the availability of more attractive sites and encouraged landlords to take a more realistic view on rents, it says.Greggs’ old bête noir Subway stays firmly in second place, adding a sluggish seven new franchises in the course of the year so far, bringing its total up to 1,427. That is a similar performance to last year’s, when it managed to recruit only 11 net new franchisees, but back in 2008 it was adding 300 a year and talking of having 2010 outlets by 2010, putting the wind up Greggs.Trevor Haynes, area development manager UK and Ireland for Subway comments: “The Subway chain has been working hard to support franchisees through what has been a challenging time for all small businesses. The chain has focused on continuing to offer our customers a range of great-tasting subs, as well as opening stores both on the high street and in non-traditional locations, including petrol forecourts and convenience stores.”Many franchisees are finding that the availability of finance from the banks is still limited, which means they are operating in a cautious market, he tells British Baker.At number six on the BB75 half-year update is SSP, the former Compass-owned travel business. Its various brands are managed separately, but increasing ingredients costs and deciding whether to pass these on to customers or to reduce margins is reported as a big common issue across the businesses, affecting key brands including Upper Crust and Caffè Ritazza.SSP now has 21 Starbucks concessions (five of which opened in 2011) operated under licence and counted with SSP’s figures rather than Starbucks’ for the purposes of the BB75 league table. Rising commodity costs, particularly the price of coffee is reported to be a key concern for that business.Lower-than-hoped-for passenger numbers are also dogging brands such as Soho Coffee Co, while Camden Food Co also sees a threat in Pret’s expansion into railway stations.SSP has recently opened its second trial BreadBox format at Victoria station as it continues to experiment with its new “round pound” value brand.Widespread changeAt number 10 on the update, Sayers The Bakers, the north west-based bakery and café chain, which operates 151 outlets, has been placed on the market this half year, with an asking price believed to be in excess of £10m. The chain, led by chairman Sandy Birnie, was acquired in a management buyout from Lyndale Foods three years ago.The management team has since restructured the business and pursued a turnaround strategy to return the business to growth, including developing Poundbakery, a value brand and retail format aimed at the “eat now” market. There are now 33 of these outlets.Elsewhere in the BB75, Kapelad-owned BB’s Coffee and Muffins (number 27 on the BB75 league table at the start of the year) has spoken of its plans for the business. Kapelad took over the business in October 2009, after the existing company went into administration. Kapelad MD Andrew Moyes tells British Baker that, previously, the chain had only appealed to a certain demographic, and he was keen to broaden this to the key 18-35 age range, while retaining its coffee and muffin focus. The company will be giving its full 70-plus shop estate a makeover and has also changed recipes and menus.Meanwhile, the troubles continue at the bakery chain once known as M Firkin, at number 36 on the league table at the start of the year. Currently called Firkins Bakery, it closed its production site in Blacklake, West Bromwich in May. Newbridge Bakery (Productions), which owned the bakery was placed into liquidation. But 33 shops stayed open and are now being supplied by craft baker Oliver Adams, based in Northampton.And Scarborough’s Woodhead Bakery, at number 39 collapsed in March, and its shops and factory were carved up in two separate deals. Coopland & Sons (Scarborough) bought 18 of the shops while Bakery Products, a standalone part of the now defunct supermarket business Haldane Retail Group, picked up the Scarborough bakery and 11 shops, which continue to trade.Coopland & Sons now has 111 shops and nine cafés, making it the UK’s third-largest craft bakery-based manufacturing chain, behind Greggs and Sayers. It bought 10 Ainsleys stores around Leeds from administrators a year ago and, in 2007, bought Hull-based Skeltons out of administration.Further down the league table at 57, Leicestershire bakery Coombs Hampshire went into liquidation on 3 June 2011, owing £650,000 to creditors, according to the company’s Statement of Affairs, submitted to Companies House. The firm has closed all its 18 shops, and its Rushey Mead factory.At the half-way point of 2011, the picture for many is a battle against the odds for survival. The BB75 has already seen two long-established names collapse so far this year, victims of the rising costs and the tough conditions on the high street. But the UK is still seen as the land of opportunity for the likes of Starbucks and Costa and that must count for something.last_img read more

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20 Apr
2021

News story: Government confirms plans to approve the home-use of early abortion pills

first_imgThe government will legalise the home-use of early medical abortion pills in England by the end of the year.Under the plans, women will be allowed to take the second of 2 early abortion pills in the safe and familiar surroundings of their own home.With clinical and legal advice clear that the use of abortion pills at home is safe and legal, women will have the choice of whether they wish to take the second pill at home or at a clinic.The current system requires women to take both pills, mifepristone and misoprostol, 24 to 48 hours apart in a clinic to end an early pregnancy before 10 weeks gestation. Women leave the clinic after taking the second pill and pass the pregnancy at home. The 2 visits can be difficult to organise and often uncomfortable or traumatic, and in some cases women can begin to miscarry before they have reached their home.4 in 5 terminations are early medical abortions, carried out under 10 weeks gestation. This means the majority of women seeking abortions will now have the option for home-use. However, women will still be able to take the second pill in a clinic if they choose to do so.The plans will not change the way women are assessed and treated for an abortion. Any woman seeking an early medical abortion will be given the usual checks including the criteria under the Abortion Act.Safeguards will be introduced to protect women undergoing this treatment at home, and the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) will work closely with partners in the health system to make the changes quickly and safely.The next step will be to work with partners, including the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, to develop clinical guidance for all professionals to follow when providing the treatment option to patients.Professor Lesley Regan, President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), said: Abortion can be a difficult experience so it is important that women feel safe and as comfortable as possible. This decision will increase choice for women and help ensure they receive safe and dignified care. Today’s announcement that use of misoprostol at home will be allowed in England is hugely welcomed and a major step forward for women’s healthcare. This simple and practical measure will provide women with significantly more choice and is the most compassionate care we can give them. It will allow women to avoid distress and embarrassment of bleeding and pain during their journey home from an unnecessary second visit to a clinic or hospital. It will also improve access to safe and regulated abortion care and take pressure off NHS services.center_img Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies said:last_img read more

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20 Apr
2021

Patisserie Valerie rescued in private equity-backed MBO

first_imgPatisserie Valerie has reportedly been sold to its management team in a move backed by a private equity firm.British Baker’s sister title The Grocer has this morning stated that the company’s management team, led by CEO Stephen Francis, is taking on the chain following the collapse of owner Patisserie Holdings last month.The management team has been backed by Causeway, an Irish private equity firm.It is understood that Patisserie Holdings businesses Philpotts, which operates from 22 sites, and London-based café chain Baker & Spice (four sites) will be sold separately, and that a number of offers have been made for both.Around 100 Patisserie Valerie sites are still trading.Administrator KPMG had been looking at a numbers of offers for Patisserie Holdings after it entered administration on 22 January.More than 70 loss-making sites had been shuttered immediately, including all the remaining Druckers stores. Together with the closure of the company’s Spitalfields bakery, the moves resulted in 920 redundancies.Patisserie Holdings had narrowly avoided collapse last year after a black hole was discovered in its finances.In recent weeks, Patisserie Holdings said work carried out by the company’s forensic accountants had revealed “extensive misstatement of its accounts”, including thousands of false entries in its ledgers.Francis, former CEO of pork producer Tulip, joined Patisserie Holdings as chief executive last November following the resignation of Paul May. He has since built up a management team including former Starbucks boss Rhys Iley as commercial director, and former Tulip MD José Peralta as director of food production and supply.last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

Lessons in observation

first_img Related Education is pivotal, Faust tells Miami students In visit to turnaround high school, Harvard president, recent alumna tout what’s possible through learning What do the gold-plated skeleton of a wooly mammoth, an immersive art history class, and a pack of monogamous mice have in common?Plenty, it turns out, and those similarities can teach us about our past, our present, and our future, according to two Harvard experts who discussed the overlapping approaches to their cutting-edge work in the fine arts and genetics at a Feb. 16 Miami event organized by the Harvard Alumni Association.In the hourlong conversation, held at the Faena Forum before a crowd of more than 400 Harvard alumni and friends from Miami and beyond, Hopi Hoekstra and Jennifer Roberts said the humanities and the sciences share key goals and processes, including a steadfast commitment to the kind of close observation that can inform how we see, appreciate, and interpret the world around us.The faculty exchange, moderated by Susan Fales-Hill ’84, formed the centerpiece of the latest gathering in the Your Harvard series, discussions sponsored by the Harvard Alumni Association throughout The Harvard Campaign that take place around the world and bring members of the global Harvard community together to connect with one another and with Harvard scholars and experts across a wide range of topics and research.Roberts’ mantra, “just because you’ve looked at it doesn’t mean you’ve seen it,” is the central tenet behind her class “The Art of Looking” a humanities frameworks course in which she asks undergraduates to spend hours in front of a painting of their choice at the Harvard Art Museums absorbing as much information and detail about the work as they can. “At first the students are alarmed by this assignment,” said Roberts, Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities. “They think they can’t possibly see three hours worth of information on a flat surface. But it’s an inspiration for them to go through the process because they quickly realize how much they hadn’t seen in their habitual glance or scan of the work.”Pulled in all directions by access to endless flows of information, contemporary students aren’t accustomed to paying such close attention to things, said Roberts. In looking at one work for hours at a time, they learn to see “what they didn’t see the moment before, and the moment before, and the moment before. And so it becomes a kind of iterative exercise for them and it’s a skill that has to be at the core of all of the humanities, I believe.”For Hoekstra, an evolutionary geneticist, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and a professor of molecular and cellular biology at Harvard, “science starts with an observation.” Hoekstra, who studies the molecular basis of adaptation in wild mice, said one of the first things she does when someone new comes to work in her lab is ask them to simply watch the mice.“It allows you to deconstruct that behavior, which gives us insights into its component parts, allows us to think about the genetic changes that make it rise to those behaviors.”Observing mice in the wild, said Hoekstra, offers up “that connection between the organism and the environment that you just can’t read in a textbook, you have to be out there, in the field.”Among the mice she studies, Hoekstra has found that certain groups behave in two very different ways. She and her colleagues have noticed that some mice like to have as many partners as they can with little familial responsibility, while others are monogamous homebodies who prefer to stay put and to be actively involved in raising their offspring.“In recent work we’ve been able to identify a gene that contributes to these differences in male parental care. … The first question is: Does it have anything to do with human behavior? And if it does, what do you do with that information?”“What is the rapport between mice and humans,” asked Fales-Hill, an author, writer, and television producer.Humans share a surprising number of genes with mice and even fruit flies, said Hoekstra. What differentiates us “is the way those genes are expressed and where and when they are expressed.”“So at the genetic level we are incredibly similar to mice and I think there are certainly several behaviors that you can make analogies about,” she continued, “but I think [once] we really understand the neurobiological underpinnings of how those behaviors work, then we are going be able to say at a different level how similar those are.”Leveraging the unique setting, Roberts encouraged attendees to engage in a close inspection of the nearly 10-foot-tall gilded mammoth skeleton across the street in the garden of the Faena Hotel, a provocative product of artist Damien Hirst, who encased the sculpture in a giant glass and gold-painted steel box.“When I look at that piece … I see this as a question that has been posed to everyone who sees it about the meaning of extinction and the passage of time.”“What art can do,” Roberts added, “is take something from the past, detour it into our current habitat and create a defamiliarizing set of new questions that make us think more deeply about the present.”Attendees at Your Harvard: Miami listen to remarks from President Drew Faust. Photo by Manny HernandezThe wooly mammoth suggested aspects of Hoekstra’s work. A close examination of DNA from the bones of a wooly mammoth preserved for thousand of years in Siberian permafrost has revealed the long extinct creature shares the exact gene mutation as the mice studied by Hoekstra, which leads to a change in the pigmentation of their fur.The discovery, she said, “raised the possibility that mammoths also came in multiple shades of color.”Following the faculty discussion, President Drew Faust outlined her vision for Harvard’s future. Promoting inclusion, community, belonging, and diversity at Harvard has been central to her presidency, as has the ongoing support of critical scientific research that tackles pressing challenges such as cancer and climate change, and her steadfast commitment to the arts.Faust outlined Harvard’s continued relevance to and impact in society today, as well as the many ways the University — through its students, faculty and alumni — will continue to make important contributions in coming decades. She began by listing the 12 Oscar nominations that had gone to films with which Harvard alumni had been directly involved.“Matt Damon, a member of the class of 1992, was nominated for ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ which he co-produced with Chris Moore, class of 1989,” Faust said. “Clark Spencer, who graduated from the College in 1985 — with a concentration in history — and from Harvard Business School in 1990, was nominated in the Animated Feature Film category for ‘Zootopia.’ Natalie Portman, class of 2003, was nominated for her portrayal of Jackie Kennedy in the film ‘Jackie.’”“La La Land, written and directed by Damien Chazelle, Harvard 2007, was nominated for a whopping 14 Academy Awards, including two songs in the best song category written by Justin Hurwitz, class of 2008, who met Chazelle when they were classmates,” she continued. “Hurwitz was also nominated for best original score, as was Nicholas Britell, who graduated phi beta kappa in the class of 2003, for the score for ‘Moonlight,’ the achingly beautiful film set here in Miami.”(An important footnote: On Feb. 26, “Zootopia” won the Oscar for best Animated Feature Film, and “La La Land” took home six trophies, including Best Director for Chazelle, and Best Original Score and Best Original Song wins for Hurwitz. “Moonlight” won Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay awards.)Beyond what the nominations said about the talents and successes of these particular Harvard-trained artists or the qualities of their films, Faust argued that the tally of honors also showcases the continued importance at Harvard of the arts and humanities, which foster, among other things, picking up on the theme of the earlier discussion, what she called “the art of noticing.”“Noticing: that is what I want to talk about for a few minutes tonight because it is at the core of what universities are about,” Faust said. “At their best, universities cultivate the art of noticing, in teaching our students to notice — to see differently— or in pursuing research, which is the art of noticing. Socrates’ ‘examined life’ — his ultimate goal for education— is in its essence about noticing.”Faust told the alumni gathered in Faena Forum, a spiraling amphitheater designed by Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, a former Harvard Graduate School of Design professor, that their Harvard time had developed their ability to notice things large and small, and to see the world in fresh new ways.Harvard, said Faust, has “woven its way into us, become a part of us. It shaped who we are, what we see, what we notice.”Together, she continued, “we can enable Harvard to set an example, and signal the world about why universities not only matter, they are essential as centers of discovery, of progress, of possibility. These are the purposes of global research universities. Together we must continue to explain them, to defend them, and to achieve them so well that we continue to survive and to prosper, and to notice.”Fort Lauderdale resident and Harvard Kennedy School alumnus Kris Meyer M.P.A. ’15 called the event a great opportunity for the local Harvard community to connect and a chance “to take some of the ideas that we heard from President Faust and our speakers back out into the community and continue to be Harvard in the world.”Your Harvard: Miami was co-hosted by the Harvard Club of Miami and the Harvard Black Alumni Society of South Florida. The next Your Harvard events are scheduled for Singapore later this month, and for Minneapolis-St. Paul in June.last_img read more

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18 Nov
2020

Kermas Energija received HANFA approval for the takeover of Apartments Medni in Trogir

first_imgHrvatska agencija za nadzor financijskih uslugu ( HANFA ), dana 19. siječnja 2018., na održanoj 8. sjednica Upravnog vijeća donijela je rješenje kako Društvu Kermas energija d.o.o. odobrava objavljivanje ponude za preuzimanje društva Apartmani Medena d.d.Cijena koju se Ponuditelj u ponudi za preuzimanje obvezuje platiti po dionici iznosi 100,00 kuna.Ponuda za preuzimanje odnosi se na sve preostale redovne dionice Apartmani Medena d.d. , točnije 236.709 redovnih dionica, što predstavlja 30,93% temeljnog kapitala društva.Inače, početkom prosinca prošle godine tvrtka Danka Končara Kermas energija jedina je ponudila tražene uvjete javne dražbe, te za 52.756.000 kuna postala vlasnik 68,93 posto dionica Apartmana Medena. Tvrtka je desetljećima poslovala sa značajnim gubicima koji su trenutno iskazani kroz iznos od oko 92 milijuna kuna, a ubuduće bi trebala poslovati u sklopu Kermas energije koja je već nakon predstečajne nagodbe postala većinski vlasnik Hotela Medena za koji su najavljena veća ulaganja u podizanje kvalitete na razinu od četiri zvjezdice kroz ukupnu investiciju od 60 milijuna eura.Attachment: HANFA /  Decision approving the publication of a takeover bid for the company Apartmani Medena dd to the company Kermas energija doolast_img read more

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18 Nov
2020

From now on, foreign tourists can also pay for parking via mobile phone thanks to the PayDo application

first_imgResidents and visitors of 22 Croatian cities can now park faster and cheaper, and the only thing you need to do is download the new free PayDo mobile and web application.However, the new parking payment application is not the main essence of this story, but its characteristic and differentiation from similar other applications – and that is that the application does not use the SMS protocol, which is why mobile operators do not pay costs and can finally use it. and tourists.Also, another great advantage of the PayDo application, backed by the IT company Infoart, is that all private and business users can easily cover the cost of parking tickets for their guests, if they do not have secured accommodation, both per hour and daily tickets.A solution for hosts in family accommodation without their own parking spacesWith this service, citizens who have paid for parking via SMS concretely and daily save, and benefit everyone who has not been able to pay by SMS at all, such as many tourists because of which the application is available in English, German and Italian.Not having a parking space with the rental of private accommodation for tourists and renters is becoming an increasing problem every day. But in the absence of their own parking spaces, boutique hotels and small renters can now use the PayDo app to provide their guests with free parking in the city area, but also in all 19 locations where the app is active. With one move, a certain amount is paid to the PayDo account and assigned to the guest. This symbolic gesture is appreciated by the guests, and even when advertising the accommodation, the landlords solve the problem of the problematic item of enabling parking.”Until now, certain categories of business users, tourists and certain private users have not been able to pay by SMS in Croatia. For these groups, the only solution to pay for parking was to look for parking machines, which for some business users meant collecting bills that they would later attach to the company. Now all users of the application are enabled to pay for parking without additional fees, while absolutely all costs are visible on one bill. “, pointed out Borivoj Sirovica, director of Infoart.Apart from Split, the PayDo application is also available in Bjelovar, Crikvenica, Dubrovnik, Novi Vinodolski, Osijek, Poreč, Pula, Rovinj, Samobor, Sisak, Slavonski Brod, Karlovac, Šibenik, Varaždin, Vodnjan, Vukovar, Vodice and Zadar. Activation is expected soon in other cities, including Zagreb, so that the service is available at the national level.You can download the free PayDo app HERElast_img read more

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