4 May
2021

USA: Twenty-Three Nations to Participate in RIMPAC Exercise

first_img View post tag: RIMPAC View post tag: participate Training & Education May 6, 2014 The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971. Hosted by U.S. Pacific Fleet, RIMPAC 2014 will be led by U.S. Vice Adm. Kenneth Floyd, commander of the U.S. Third Fleet (C3F), who will serve as the Combined Task Force (CTF) Commander. Royal Australian Navy Rear Adm. Simon Cullen will serve as deputy commander of the CTF, and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force Rear Adm. Yasuki Nakahata as the vice commander. Other key leaders of the multinational force will include Rear Adm. Gilles Couturier of the Royal Canadian Navy, who will command the maritime component, Air Commodore Chris Westwood of the Royal Australian Air Force, who will command the air component, and Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Richard Simcock, who will command the land component. RIMPAC 2014 will also include a special operations component for the first time, to be led by U.S. Navy Capt. William Stevens.Two nations, Brunei and the People’s Republic of China, will participate in RIMPAC for the first time in 2014. Also new at RIMPAC this year are two hospital ships, USNS Mercy and PLA (N) Peace Ark which will participate in the exercise. The theme of RIMPAC 2014 is “Capable, Adaptive, Partners.” The participating nations and forces will exercise a wide range of capabilities and demonstrate the inherent flexibility of maritime forces. These capabilities range from disaster relief and maritime security operations to sea control and complex warfighting. The relevant, realistic training syllabus includes amphibious operations, gunnery, missile, anti-submarine and air defense exercises as well as counter-piracy, mine clearance operations, explosive ordnance disposal and diving and salvage operations. This year’s exercise includes forces from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, People’s Republic of China, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom and the United States.[mappress]Press Release, May 6, 2014; Image: US Navy USA: Twenty-Three Nations to Participate in RIMPAC Exercise View post tag: Exercise View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Nation’s Twenty-three nations, 47 ships, six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel will participate in the biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise scheduled June 26 to Aug. 1, in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Twenty-Three Nations to Participate in RIMPAC Exercise View post tag: Twenty-Three Share this articlelast_img read more

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3 May
2021

Time change Is This Weekend: It’s Time To ‘Spring Forward’ 1 Hour

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Time Change Is This Weekend center_img Daylight Saving Time starts this weekend, meaning it’s time for people around the U.S. to set their clocks ahead one hour before going to bed Saturday night (March 10).Daylight Saving Time officially start 2 a.m. Sunday, when clocks are moved ahead one hour to 3 a.m.The good news is most electronic devices – cell phones, computers, some car clocks, etc. – are programmed to advance automatically. The bad news is most clocks and watches are not, meaning you will have to make the change yourself.More Light In The Evening HoursSunrise and sunset will be about one hour later on March 11 than the day before, meaning more light in the evening hours. The time will change again on Nov. 4 when clocks will move back one hour.The idea dates to Benjamin Franklin, who first proposed the idea as a way to conserve energy.  DST – then known as “fast time” – was instituted in World War I in several countries, including the U.S., but abandoned shortly after the war ended. It was revived in 1942 by President Franklin Roosevelt and utilized during World War II.President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Uniform Time Act in 1966, establishing schedules for daylight saving time and eliminating the problem of local governments setting their own. In 2005, President George W. Bush extended daylight saving time for an extra four weeks, setting the start date each year as the second Sunday of March with an ending day on the first Sunday of November.The time-change idea is not without controversy. Hawaii and Arizona don’t observe Daylight Saving Time and just this year, Florida legislators passed a measure that would allow the Sunshine State to remain on DST year-round. The measure is awaiting Gov. Rick Scott’s signature and would require Congressional approval before it could be instituted.Internationally, only about 40 percent of the world’s countries observe DST.The beginning of DST doesn’t signal the official start of spring, however. The vernal (or spring) equinox will be on March 20 at 11:15 a.m. this year.last_img read more

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21 Apr
2021

Patisserie Valerie is set to expand

first_imgPremium café chain Patisserie Valerie is on target to have 125 stores by 2013, with at least six opening this year.Shops in Leeds, Bath, and London will soon follow those recently launched in Cambridge and Canterbury and the firm is in negotiations to open even more in 2010. There are already 29 Patisserie Valerie shops out of a total of 68 owned by Patisserie Holdings, which also includes stores under the Druckers and Baker & Spice brand. It has also opened two franchised Patisserie Valerie stores in Dubai and two in Bahrain, and expects to have 15 in the Middle East in the next two years.The company is owned by Risk Capital Partners, which is bankrolling the expansion said CEO Paul May. The fact the brand was well-known in London had resulted a good response when opening in new locations, while it did not have a direct competitor, which also helped, he explained. “We sell affordable treats and don’t rush people out. We also haven’t changed our offer outside London.”He added that there was no reason for the company not to continue opening new stores, but that finding sites was the biggest issue. “I’m very disciplined about costs and we look to open in reasonably affluent locations.”last_img read more

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21 Apr
2021

British Baker to stop selling in newsagents

first_imgBritish Baker will no longer be sold at newsagents from the end of September.The last issue through newsagents will be 24 September. Distribution through the National News Wholesale Network is no longer viable for the magazine.However, bakers currently ordering their copy through newsagents will still be able to receive British Baker through subscription. By taking out a subscription, British Baker will be delivered free to your door every fortnight. The cost for a year’s issues (25 copies) will be £59, saving £14.75 on the cost through your newsagent of £73.75.To subscribe please call 0800 6526512 now and quote code: ’NEWS3’ for the discount.last_img

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20 Apr
2021

Fatality notice: Sergeant Matt Tonroe has been killed in action in the Middle East

first_img If you had met Matt Tonroe, then you would have liked him. He bristled with the contentment of a life lived to its full. His bravery and talent as a soldier, was matched by his compassion as a human being. He was an individual, with the courage to set his own course, and the perspective to see new possibilities at every turn. He was destined for great things in our unit; his leadership was both natural and apparently effortless. He is already missed. Without Matt, our company has lost some of its humour; some of its warmth; and some of its sheer opportunism. We will always remember him. My thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of Sergeant Matt Tonroe at this dreadful time. Sergeant Tonroe served his country with great distinction and it is clear from the tributes made by his colleagues that he was not only exceptionally dedicated and courageous but also a gifted and intelligent instructor who was respected by everyone he served with. Sergeant Tonroe fought to protect British values, our freedoms and to keep us back at home safe. His sacrifice, unflinching commitment and bravery will never be forgotten. Sergeant Matt Tonroe.It is with great sadness that the Ministry of Defence must confirm that Sergeant Matt Tonroe from the 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment was tragically killed in action whilst on duty in the Middle East on the 29th March 2018.Sergeant Tonroe was born in Manchester on the 14th of August 1984. He enlisted in the Army on the 27th September 2004. On completion of his initial training he joined the 3rd Battalion of The Parachute Regiment in Colchester where he served as part of the Sniper Platoon. He rapidly developed an array of competencies and combat experiences that were to lay the foundations of an outstanding career.During his service, Matt deployed numerous times on operations to Afghanistan and the Middle East. His distinguished service reflected a man that was happiest when professionally tested on operations. He relished responsibility, the opportunity to contribute and when the time came, to lead. He was a natural in this role.Matt was also a capable and respected parachutist. As a gifted instructor he was free with his time and his advice, and would dedicate himself to support and develop this skill in others.He was well known within his unit, well-liked by all and he will be sorely missed. When talking of Matt, his colleagues recount his humour, mischief and endless endeavours. Laid back, but a consummate professional, Matt was utterly selfless and always strived to achieve excellence.Matt was very much a family man, making every effort to see his beloved mum around numerous overseas deployments. He is survived by his mother Michelle, his brother Alex and girlfriend Olivia.Sgt Tonroe’s Officer Commanding said Matt Tonroe was a deeply intelligent man and one of life’s characters. He was a caring and considerate soul, a loving and dutiful son, and a friend to many. Yet he had a steel core, served his country with pride and was a first class soldier, proven in combat, faced risk willingly and was ever ready for more. He thus died as he lived: daring and fearless in duty. We mourn his loss dearly, are proud to have known him and will honour him by continuing this fight.center_img Sgt Tonroe’s Commanding Officer said Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson saidlast_img read more

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20 Apr
2021

Cronuts: what you need to know

first_imgCronuts are the latest bakery craze to come from the USA and here British Baker explains what you need to know about the tasty treats – and asks if they are the new cupcake?Cronuts – what you need to know | Create infographicslast_img

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2 Mar
2021

Horseshoes & Hand Grenades Talk New Music, Life On The Road And More

first_imgWisconsin acoustic ragers Horseshoes & Handgrenades has seen their stock rise in the music community over the past year or so, behind a workhorse load of touring and bringing the people what they want: hard-picking bluegrass and old-time music. They’ve toured with heavyweights like Yonder Mountain String Band and Greensky Bluegrass and been able to impress people in new places with both their intense musicality and their palpable enjoyment that comes from playing in front of people. Probably the person who sports the biggest grin during shows is singer and guitarist Adam Greuel. Live for Live Music’s Garrett Bethmann had the chance to talk with him Saturday at the High Sierra Music Festival in Quincy, CA as he was preparing for a long day of workshops and late-night sets. A sort of mutual admiration society commenced as Greuel revealed his religious dedication to checking up on Live for Live Music to check the pulse of the live music scene, and we revealed our love for what Horseshoes & Hand Grenades are doing up on stage.Bright days are ahead for Greuel and company! Read below to find out where the guitarist thinks you can find some of the best musicians at a festival and what the plan is for a new album.This interview has been edited slightly for length and clarity.Live For Live Music: I have a recorder on both my phone and my computer, I am using the computer today just cause it is a little more high-tech. Adam Greuel: My buddy Charlie Parr, he’s recording like shit tons of demos and stuff on his phone while he’s driving. Its funny because its Charlie Parr, a rootsy, organic dude, and I am just envisioning him driving his truck and recording on his iPhone, sort of struggling (laughs).L4LM: I caught y’alls set on Friday and met you at WinterWonderGrass briefly, when you flew in from…Greuel: Yonder! From the Yonder tour. Straight from Austin on the Yonder tour to WinterWonderGrass. And then our fiddler wasn’t able to be there. So Tim Carbone from Railroad came and played the three sets with us and that was a hoot. Then we got to know him sort of well kind of as a result and that was really cool. L4LM: So what has this experience been like, cause this is your first time at High Sierra. What were you guys doing yesterday?Greuel: Again we kind of came in on a whim. We had gotten here just before our set. I think one cool thing from California festivals is the vibe of the people. It is just so damn mellow. So laid back and kind. They have this gentle kindness to them, and you can feel that and it is fun to be a part of. It is fun to take a little bit of our midwest roots and bring it out west where maybe people haven’t seen that kind of thing. It certainly feels that way in the times we’ve been out here. But the positive energy is alive and well here at High Sierra.L4LM: This is my first time here at this festival and you guys hit up a lot of festivals I am sure, right? But how many are you able to actually stay and enjoy? You guys are playing tonight as well with Greensky.Greuel: Dude that is the best! You’re right, a lot of the times we have to come in and leave right away. But it is sweet when you get to spend time at a festival and you begin to understand the sense of family and community that exists at music festivals, that along with music pulls people there. That energy that is created by people helping one another or getting behind something together. The energy of the collective. You get to start to see that. Like here, you walk around, and everyone is down to help each other. Like “Hey do you have a beer? You look like you need a beer.” Or, “Hey you’re hungry? I just cooked up some food and come on over to our camp and hang out.”You get to see the kindness of people and the culture of the people in that area. L4LM: What has the vibe at High Sierra been like?Greuel: It was good. Our set was really, really fun. We had shown up really quick and everyone who runs the festival was super nice, way down to help you out. It’s interesting because the crowd is a lot more mellow. Like definitely when the song ends they’re really excited and rage, but during the song there is a lot of minds really thinking about the music, which is different than what we are used to in the upper midwest. So that was a neat component. I’m excited tonight about our late night set and that is really one of our more favorite times to play; play at midnight with our friends Greensky Bluegrass. That will be raging. We got to know them after a month long tour this year. We are also hosting at like 5:15 p.m. we are hosting a pick, a bluegrass pick. There are a lot of great americana and folk bands that are here like Gipsy Moon and Billy Strings and the bluegrass pick will be a chance to play with everyone. L4LM: Have you ever doing anything like that?Greuel: We are sort of notorious for fostering collaboration. We dig on that. It is a strong component in all of the americana scene, I think. There is a language we are all speaking with music that makes it easy for those collaborations. Even if you don’t know the song you can sort of communicate it using your instrument to fellow musicians. We love feeling other bands vibes, getting to co-mingle. Cause there is so much new music happening. The more you travel around the more you realize you are just a small piece of the puzzle. L4LM: Yeah, one thing that has been fun for me is walking around the campgrounds because right where I am camped there are like three bands that all brought in their equipment and are jamming all throughout the day and night. Have you been able to get into the campgrounds at all?Greuel: That is awesome! So that will be my tonight. We had a big day yesterday and I zonked out early. I did catch Chis Robinson Brotherhood who I had never seen before. I wanted to catch their set after I met Neal (Casal), their guitar player, when he was working with the Hard Working Americans— and still is. So that was sweet. I love the campfire jams because some of the best songwriters and musicians are there, not on the stages. Just cause 2,000 people are at a show enjoying someone’s music, doesn’t mean they are any better or have any more musicianship than the guy playing for five friends in his campsite. I find that to be really inspirational. There is so much good music out there and you never know who you are going to stumble upon that will revitalize your muse. L4LM: Is there anyone you want to see Saturday?Greuel: Dr. Dog. A lot of friends have hipped me to them but I haven’t heard one song of theirs, so I going to heed the call. But I don’t know man, I love all the kinds of music. One thing about Horseshoes and Handgrenades is that we are rooted in bluegrass and old-time music, but our approach to it is really open. We want to take any of our musical interests and incorporate it into acoustic music. For instance our bass player Sam (Odin) is really into Miles Davis and jazz.L4LM: He looks like he is into jazz.Greuel: Yeah he does (laughs), and he’s good at it too. Our accordion and harmonica player Dave (Lynch) is really into cajun music. That works its way into our stuff. I love that San Francisco rock and roll. Chris Robinson Brotherhood was awesome for what I am into. But we like it all and at a festival like High Sierra, where it is just a big ball of music, it is a great fit for us to walk around and experience it all and put it in our pocket for later in our own music. L4LM: What are you guys working on right now? I know you guys have a lot of things on SoundCloud and are touring a bunch. When can we look forward to something getting pressed to tape?Greuel: So there are five guys in the band and we all song write often. It is just part of my life, I’ll write a couple songs in a week. There is tons of material all the time. The biggest obstacle to recording is the fact we love touring. So this winter we’ve specifically planned to take time off to record a record and come out with that at some point in 2017, probably the first half. We’ve got three studio albums so far so this will be the fourth one. I think we are going to have some friends come on there and do some recording, friends we’ve met along the way like Tim Carbone. We are going to see where it takes us, we’re excited about it with plenty of songs to choose from. L4LM: I’m really excited for new music and seeing you play. You always look like you are so stoked to be up there playing, which I really appreciate and gravitate towards.Greuel: I mean it comes from a place of joy and a real sense of happiness. I think if folks can come to a show and forget about everything else for an hour and a half, and if helps them feel good that is awesome. It makes me feel really, really good. Music for me is an outlet and I don’t know if I ever feel better than when I am up on stage playing and I can look out into the crowd and see folks beaming with a smile, or crying, or even zoning out. Whatever people need to do I hope we can help facilitate that and they can get the release they need. That is the biggest joy in playing music.last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Saint Mary’s panel discusses Ferguson aftermath

first_imgA panel discussion Tuesday at Saint Mary’s titled “Understanding Ferguson and its Aftermath” explored the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., and used the incident as a starting point for interdisciplinary dialogue among faculty and students, panelist and professor of communication studies Helen Ho said.“The Ferguson story has become such an enormous and ongoing contentious narrative in the last few months, and it’s something that sets the backdrop for our return to campus, a place for critical discussion and thoughtful deliberation,” Ho said. “Panels like this help can help to provide a space for conversation, as well as a contextualization and synthesis of ideas for those who have been following, or trying to follow, the events.”Cristina Russo | The Observer The panel also included Jamie Wagman, assistant professor of history and gender and women’s studies, and Stacy Davis, associate professor of religious studies and chair of the department of gender and women’s studies. Senior humanistic studies major Clare Maher also participated, panel coordinator and assistant professor of English Ann Marie Alfonso-Forero said.“During the weeks that followed [the shooting of Michael Brown], there was a lot of news coverage of the event and the community grieved … while the police in Ferguson responded to it with tanks and tear gas,” Alfonso-Forero said. “We were talking about how we might address this issue with our students, and we’d feel remiss if we didn’t address this in some way.”The purpose of the panel was to discuss the historical and social contexts of the shooting, the militarization of police in Ferguson and the ongoing protests demanding justice, Wagman said.“We know there was a confrontation between an armed police officer and an unarmed teenager,” she said. “… The community responded with protests. The protest pride became ‘Hands up, don’t shoot.’ Other towns, cities and college campuses held rallies for peace and justice. At times, the media has questioned Brown’s character.”Maher said the increased role of social media in telling and spreading stories like those from Ferguson highlight her generation’s reluctance to use social media as a truly reliable informing medium. She encouraged the audience to use social media for more substantive discussions using credible sources.“In the age of social media, we don’t research why, and context is not something we value,” she said. “Headlines are often the only way we read a newspaper. Social media is not meant to be comprehensive, it’s meant to be social.“Our society is increasingly underinformed. The picture we get from the news media is uninformed. Declaring our personal stance in social media seems significant, [but] you should be moved to look at more than just a Buzzfeed article. Change the narrative, find context. Publish articles in your status.”Davis addressed the subject of militarization, particularly armed police militarization and the perceptions of police in African-American communities.“One of the things that folks have been protesting about in Ferguson is what they have called the militarization of the police force, the use of armored cars,” Davis said. “The police have acted like the military.”“My hope is that what is happening in Ferguson will once again start a conversation about the relationship between law enforcement and civilians,” she said. “At least in black communities, this is just one more unarmed black kid. The hope for us and for anybody is, can we reach a point where these things do not happen? Most of the folks in Ferguson just want to know what happened to one of their own.”Ho said the American public should question why it grows indifferent to these types of tragedies and how the stories are portrayed in the media.“Part of the way some media outlets are discussing this story is that ‘tragedies like this occur all the time,’ and Brown’s death shouldn’t be made a big deal,” she said. “This reaction downplays the real emotions and histories felt by various populations and communities and the real lived experiences that some of us cannot and will not ever be able to fully comprehend.”Beyond media treatment of the story, Ho said Americans should realize the role of government officials in the incident and inform themselves about the deep-seeded issues behind the incident.“We should, as citizens in a democracy, have a right to hold our elected officials accountable and have a say in how we are protected, and by whom,” Ho said. “… It’s easy for outsiders, professional reporters, politicians and others to say things should be fine in a place like Ferguson. But, those who have talked to the residents of Ferguson find a different story, a story about a community whose lived experience is very different.“The fact that this story has resonated for so many around the country illustrates that these feelings and experiences resonate beyond Ferguson. This shared sense of, ‘here we go again,’ is something people should be using to come together to discuss larger contexts of race, representation, media narratives and social justice.” Tags: Ferguson, panel, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

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18 Jan
2021

Weekend Poll Top Three: Fans Salute If/Then’s Josh

first_img 2. Chris, Miss Saigon—19% Who wouldn’t want to be the moon to this GI’s sunlight? Chris may be transferred soon from his station in the West End to Broadway, and we certainly can’t wait to welcome this sergeant home. 3. Joseph Cable, South Pacific—17% Lietenant Cable has some baggage that he has to get over before all that “happy talk” on Bali Ha’i, not to mention malaria, but a man who can croon “Younger Than Springtime” will win us over every time. Fleet Week is drawing to a close, and, sadly, that means considerably less sailors roaming the streets of New York. Still, each of us should always be grateful for the men and women who have served our country. This Memorial Day weekend, we asked you to pick your favorite Broadway man in uniform. Sure, they may be fictional, but that doesn’t mean we can’t pay tribute to them!  1. Josh, If/Then—23% Hey, kid! Josh has double the storylines, so that means extra love from fans. Depending on who you ask (either Liz or Beth), things don’t always turn out as planned, but we still salute this Army doctor, played by Broadway.com video blogger James Snyder.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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30 Dec
2020

Bees!

first_imgWatch out for the bees. It’s that time of year when the yellow jackets are in full force, frisky in the cool air, desperate in their final weeks of life, looking for a way to be remembered.So many of us have stories involving mountain bikes, yellow jackets, blood-curdling screams, and brutal stings followed by Benadryl slumbers.One fine fall day I was chasing two friends down Bennett Gap when at the top of the descent, through a very rocky and steep section, the bees attacked me, mad because the boys ahead of me rode over their nest and kept going. By the time the bees realized how mad they were about this disturbance, I happened to be bouncing my way down the hill after said boys. The bees, who didn’t have my same desire for chasing boys, decided instead to end their lives after jamming their stingers into ME.At first I tried to hold onto the bike and just go faster. That lasted for two seconds before I realized that I needed both hands to clear my skin surface of the mad insects. They seemed to be everywhere, including inside of my helmet, where they had the nerve to be even more mad than the ones merely stinging my legs. I jumped from my bike and tossed it down the hill in the direction I was headed so that I could run and swat simultaneously. Unfortunately I was unable to throw the bike very far, and soon surpassed it in my freakish downhill flight in cleats and spandex. I screamed to let the guys know I was being held back, but my words were not even coherent to my own ears.“Bees!” I screamed, “Bees! Don’t come back for me!”I didn’t want them getting stung, too. I continued staggering down the hill screaming and swatting when Jon came back only for me to yell for him to run away, run away! I flung my buzzing helmet down the hill and beat myself in the head as the bees trapped themselves into my thick, sweaty hair. Despite my warnings, he bravely entered the vicious swarm and helped me whack at bees, shouting for me to take off my shirt, which made me laugh, even though there really were bees inside of it.We managed to drop the swarm and collapsed onto a rock to inspect the damage as angry red welts immediately rose from my skin. I dreaded having to go back to retrieve my bike. I was feeling a little light-headed and couldn’t decide if it was from the adrenalin rush, stripping in the forest, or the histamines coursing through my veins. 1 2last_img read more

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