1 Mar
2021

Linking China’s climate policy to its growth

first_imgOver the next three decades China’s growth will be such that if its leaders don’t act on climate change, it might not matter what the rest of the world does, Nobel Prize-winning economist Michael Spence said in a Harvard talk Tuesday.Spence, a New York University professor who served as dean of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences from 1984 to 1990, pointed to several environmental and energy factors to consider alongside China’s rapid development.Population growth is controlled, and per-capita income is expected to continue to rise, which usually coincides with a decrease in the energy intensity of an economy. Further, there is great opportunity to engage in sustainable construction in China because so much — buildings, electric grids, even cities — is still in the planning stages.The pressing question is whether China will take advantage of opportunities to shift from high-carbon fuels, such as coal, and curb the clouds of pollution billowing from the tailpipes of its burgeoning fleet of cars.“I think the issue comes down to carbon intensity, and there the story is much less clear,” Spence said. “I am not aware of anything that looks like a comprehensive plan that takes carbon intensity down beyond the effect of, let’s call it, a fairly successful and aggressive program of energy efficiency.”Spence spoke at the Science Center before a crowd of several hundred. The lecture, sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment and the Harvard China Project, was first in a series on energy, climate, and development in China over the next 20 years.Spence went deep into the dynamics of economic development in low- and middle-income nations. Most of today’s high-tech, high-wage economies are in Europe or are European offshoots, such as the United States, Canada, and Australia. Just a handful of other nations, such as Japan and South Korea, have been able to develop quickly and avoid what is called the “middle-income trap,” in which rapid initial growth gives way to stagnation at a level below the standards of Western industrialized nations, with per-capita incomes between $3,000 and $10,000 a year.The middle-income trap, or, as Spence calls it, “middle-income transition,” develops when a nation’s rapid growth gradually cools amid rising incomes, eroding its relative advantage for low-cost manufacturing.The common trait among countries that have managed to push through the trap, Spence said, is a high level of economic investment, which allows manufacturing to shift to high-value, high-wage products. An important part of that shift is ramping up domestic demand for goods and services. Early in a country’s development, growth can be fueled largely by exports, but as incomes and manufacturing costs rise, domestic demand has to come along, helping support the economy as its global advantage declines.China will be the next country to see its way through, Spence believes. The government has an enormous balance sheet of assets to cushion the shocks along the way, and seems to have the savvy to employ market-based solutions when they would work best and more traditional command-and-control solutions when not, he said. It also has room to be more decisive than Western democracies, where political will is often the principal factor holding back reforms. High pollution levels, already a major concern, might lead to substantive action. The design of new cities, for example, could incorporate features that reduce the need for automobiles.However, Spence said he hasn’t yet seen a coherent strategy, so it remains to be seen whether China will successfully address pollution and climate change.“My best guess is that they’ll go after it much more aggressively because of the environmental contamination of air quality, water quality, the things that … really matter to people,” he said.last_img read more

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18 Jan
2021

Meet Kinky Boots Star Kyle Taylor Parker

first_img “Until now, I’d never been in drag or danced in heels. I’ve never done makeup. I’ve never had to think about how your hair can throw off your balance, just while walking! I have so much respect for women.” Current Role: A three-month stint in Broadway’s Kinky Boots, filling in for Billy Porter as the fierce and fabulous Lola, an outspoken drag performer who becomes a specialty boot designer. Kinky Boots Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 View Comments “My mom works in public health for prevention and awareness of HIV and AIDS, so when I was nine years old, we started moving around a lot. I lived in East Africa, West Africa, Paris and Zurich, then ended up in Wisconsin from middle to high school.” “When I started selling merchandise for In the Heights on Broadway, I thought, ‘I’m gonna be in this show someday.’ [Choreographer] Andy Blankenbuehler would give notes in the lobby, so I’d hang around with my notebook. Years later, he was giving me notes on tour! It was a full-circle moment.” “I’m the biggest theater nerd I know, and I’ve always been obsessed with Broadway. I had a big playroom as a kid, so I would put together shows and charge my grandmother and mom admission. I’d play all the characters, so it was a very long evening.”center_img “I lost my father when I had first joined the Broadway company, so it’s interesting being back in the Al Hirschfeld Theatre. Parts of my performance are a tribute to that relationship, which was a bit unfinished between the two of us. It’s been a time to reflect and to celebrate how much I’ve grown.” Age: 25 Hometown: “Wisconsin, by way of the world.” Stage & Screen Cred: After appearing in the national tour of In the Heights, Parker made his Broadway debut as an Angel in Kinky Boots. After kicking off the musical’s national tour as Lola, he’s returned to Broadway to reprise his role. “Oprah is my spirit animal! She taught me that you can shape your whole life just by thinking positively. She said, ‘Be yourself and make the best of it.’ I try to say at least one positive thing like that to myself before I take the stage.” Related Showslast_img read more

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31 Dec
2020

Southwest Power Pool sets new wind generation record

first_imgSouthwest Power Pool sets new wind generation record FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Oklahoman:Hold on to your hat. Another wind energy penetration record was set this week on the electrical grid that serves Oklahoma and much of the Great Plains.The Southwest Power Pool announced energy generated by wind supplied about 15.3 gigawatts of 23.3 gigawatts of needed power across its 546,000-square-mile service territory at 2:08 a.m. Wednesday.That’s 65.7%, which means there was about a two in three chance that phone you charged overnight obtained that power from a renewable energy source.“As new wind gets installed that adds to our capacity and we do transmission improvements, both contribute to allow us to get more and more out of our wind resources,” said C.J. Brown, the regional transmission organization’s director of operations. Brown added that wind power-related records are fleeting as more and more of the resource is added onto the Southwest Power Pool’s grid.He attributes that not only to the organization’s success in building transmission lines to get that power onto the SPP grid, but also SPP’s efforts to improve its load forecasting and reliability and pricing functions.As of this week, there was 21.5 gigawatts of installed wind capacity within the SPP’s territory available to energize the system’s 66,000 miles of high voltage lines. In 2009, just 3 gigawatts of capacity was installed.More: Wind energy sets new record on the Southwest Power Pool’s gridlast_img read more

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20 Dec
2020

Drug Trafficking, Gang Violence Rising Rapidly in Eastern Caribbean

first_img UNDP: Murder rates rising throughout Caribbbean By Dialogo February 27, 2012 Law enforcement authorities throughout the Eastern Caribbean are struggling to control a wave of violent crime as drug traffickers — meeting resistance in Mexico and Central America — turn their attention towards the region’s English-speaking islands. The effects are being felt from Antigua to St. Kitts to Grenada, where traffickers flush with illicit cash have established themselves, spreading their culture of violence. Some islands have become transshipment points due to their proximity to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Once cocaine reaches either of those two U.S. jurisdictions, it can be transported to the U.S. mainland without undergoing customs inspections. “We’ve seen an upsurge in the amount of cocaine trafficking in the last three years,” said Lauston Percival, a constable in the Royal St. Kitts & Nevis Police Force. Drug trafficking in the Eastern Caribbean imposes a double whammy on island societies, say analysts. Not only does it threaten democratic institutions and the rule of law, but since traffickers pay their surrogates in kind, rather than in currency, a local market is created for cocaine and crack, with all the accompanying social and public health problems that entails. With limited resources at their disposal, local law enforcement and criminal justice systems must battle an industry that worldwide earns upwards of $600 billion per year, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). By comparison, an entry-level policeman in St. Lucia earns about $500 a month. That makes for low morale among police officers, said Marcus Day, director of the St. Lucia-based Caribbean Drug and Alcohol Research Institute. The low price of crack cocaine — $5 a rock — has fueled the proliferation of its use, said Day. “We’re seeing a growing use of crack cocaine, accompanied by a high level of violence,” he said, adding that “the level of frustration in the police force is enormous and common throughout the islands.” With help from the U.S. Coast Guard, Kittitian authorities have made significant drug busts in the last several years. Programs such as microfinancing and business development “offer alternatives to youths who otherwise get involved in drug trafficking” and are key to saving at-risk kids from low-income neighborhoods who shy away from formal education but don’t lack in youthful energy, said Day. “With kids like this, the only people who will give them credit are drug dealers,” he noted. The rise of gangs has been fueled in part by images in popular media glamorizing gang culture and seducing many of the islands’ youth, said Percival. Other problems facing law enforcement include a thriving guns-for-drugs trade, as well as the repatriation of gang members who may have gone to the United States with their parents as children years ago. “When they come home, they pick up where they left off and involve local youth in crime,” he said. In 2011, St. Kitts & Nevis reported 34 murders, most of them drug-related. Though that number may sound small, it isn’t, considering that the twin-island nation is home to just over 50,000 people. That translates into a homicide rate of 64 per 100,000 inhabitants. center_img Fighting an uphill battle In fact, with the exception of Barbados and Suriname, homicide rates including gang-related killings have increased substantially in the last 12 years across the Caribbean, while they have been falling or stabilizing in other parts of the world, according to a new report issued Feb. 8 by the United Nations Development Program. The report, “Human Development and the Shift to Better Citizen Security,” said that Caribbean governments can reverse the trend, calling for regional governments to beef up public institutions to tackle crime and violence — including the criminal justice system—while boosting preventive measures. “Violence limits people’s choices, threatens their physical integrity, and disrupts their daily lives,” said UNDP Administrator Helen Clark at the report’s launch ceremony in Trinidad. “This report stresses the need to rethink our approaches to tackling crime and violence and providing security on the ground. We need to follow approaches that are centered on citizen security and address the causes of this recent increase in violent crime, including social, economic, and political exclusion.” Because of their country’s small size and sense of community, the people of St. Kitts mourn every single murder victim. Local authorities have responded by creating Operation Future, a prevention program run by the police force that seeks to steer youngsters away from drugs and trafficking from a very early age. The program also involves at-risk youths in outdoor activities, and introduces kids to former gang members now in prison who deglamorize the drug business. Among other things, the children learn that the drug business is not nearly as lucrative for the street-level operator as is popularly believed. “Drug trafficking isn’t going to make you rich. Kids think [dealing drugs] is better than growing up to be old and poor, but they find out that it’s really about being young and poor and dead,” said Dan MacMullin, an attorney and former Royal Canadian Mounted Policeman who relocated 12 years ago to St. Kitts and volunteers in Operation Future. A number of gang members have come to authorities asking to be extracted from the drug trade, said MacMullin. In addition to education, said Day, the solution to the drug problem ultimately lies in offering a substitute to the gangster lifestyle. “We’re talking about semi-literate, unemployed youth,” he said. “How do we supply them with an alternative?” because this major problem of society gets worse every day, but what happens is that we are dedicated to judging the young boy that is using drugs and helping him I invite you to start helping them and stop judging them, what do you say? Law enforcement agencies, anti narcotics, and those dealing with the security of the Caribbean nations, in a general sense, despite their efforts of many, are mostly permissive, are prey of illusion and ambition for easy money, since they see how Government officials are permissive to corruption and organized crime, and with low wages and much precariousness, it is easy for them to become accomplices in all this crime that today affect the people of the Caribbean in general. Young people and many old people fill their heads with morbid and dreams of greatness and fortune, but they don’t realize that one has to make a living working, idleness and those defects of the neoliberal system lead to crime and death, prematurely or immature. I am extremely ASHAMED that in my country, GUATEMALA, certain groups are involved in this. STILL trying to decriminalize offences of drug trafficking that involve money laundering, organized crime and human trafficking. it would help governments to be better if there is first world quality and the police forces had been communitarian at the service of public charity with a lot of government financial resources. thanks for the attention. go change your life namo No drugslast_img read more

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20 Oct
2020

GOP tax plan all about wishful thinking

first_imgTo secure these small economic gains and that tiny revenue bump, Republicans would cut taxes by well over a trillion dollars, leaving a massive hole in the budget. Over time, the negative consequences of higher federal borrowing would be a serious drag on the economy. The bill Republicans present this week will look somewhat different than the older framework the Tax Policy Center’s experts assessed.But the warning should still shake Republicans who claimed to be deficit hawks when Barack Obama was president. Tax reform could be worthwhile, but only if it is paid for.Republicans such as Portman used to understand as much.The country faces a huge funding squeeze as the Baby Boomers retire, raising pension and health-care costs.The Treasury will need ample revenue merely to maintain investments in everything else – roads, college aid, national parks, scientific research.A tax plan based on hopes, prayers and fiction puts all of that at risk.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? In a sentence, Portman erased much of the credibility he developed while decrying deficits during the Obama years or running the White House Office of Management and Budget during the George W. Bush presidency.Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, one of the few moderate Republicans left in Congress, was hardly more responsible.“If we have just four-tenths of 1 percent increase in our [gross domestic product], which is entirely realistic, it will cover the cost of the tax reform package,” she claimed.In fact, those growth numbers cannot be assumed, and betting the federal budget on hopes of loads of new revenue is highly risky.Just a couple days earlier, an independent report on the Republicans’ most recent tax-reform framework found that the plan would wallop the federal budget, even when effects on economic growth are considered. The Tax Policy Center concluded that cutting the corporate tax rate, encouraging business investment and enhancing incentives to work would each encourage economic expansion – modestly.The extra growth would result in maybe $50 billion in new federal revenue over 10 years. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post:Republicans aim to unveil Wednesday a long-awaited tax plan, premised on the fanciful idea that slashing taxes by $1.5 trillion over 10 years will somehow leave the federal budget better off.And it is not just the GOP’s most blinkered ideologues who have bought into this wishful thinking. “I think at the end of the day this will actually be reducing the deficit because it’s going to finally get this economy moving,”Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said Sunday on “Meet the Press.”last_img read more

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20 Oct
2020

London’s prime residential values slide

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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6 Oct
2020

Entertain family and friends right here in this superb location

first_imgOne of the large bathrooms at 82 McIlwraith Ave, Norman Park.Making the most of a rear northern aspect and privacy of the grounds, the kitchen, lounge and dining areas flow out through floor-to-ceiling glass sliders, on to flawless alfresco entertaining areas. Enjoy the open-plan design at 82 McIlwraith Ave, Norman Park.Mr Sung said the home was great for entertaining friends and family.“From the kitchen, there’s a clear view of the outside area,” he said.“It’s perfect for parents wanting to keep an eye on children.”Located within the catchment of the highly-regarded Seven Hills State School, the property is an easy walk to St Thomas’ Primary, transport, local cafes, shops and the popular Perth Street Park. You could certainly cook up a storm here at 82 McIlwraith Ave, Norman Park.Mr Sung said the two-level property at 82 McIlwraith Ave, had four bedrooms, each serviced by their own bathroom.One of the bathrooms is a shared ensuite.He said there was an easy option of a fifth bedroom.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020 Invite your mates around and enjoy the space at 82 McIlwraith Ave, Norman Park.Surrounded by established greenery, the shaded terrace with integrated barbecue sits beside the grassed yard and saltwater pool with stone water feature.A separate theatre or children’s playroom and private home office are also on the ground level.Mr Sung says the property is in one of the area’s top end streets.“It’s on the crest of the street and there is a very nice outlook at the front,” he said. 82 Mcilwraith Ave, Norman Park.A new build at Norman Park has hit the market and is designed for growing families.Builder Richard Sung, who is selling the five-bedroom, three-bathroom property, said it was “probably one of the best homes” he has built.“It really is a great family house,” said Mr Sung, who lives in the area.“This home would be perfect for a family with young kids or even teenage children – there’s lots of separate living areas.”last_img read more

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27 Sep
2020

Heck – we even made the BBC News!

first_imgbbc.co.uk 17 April 2013New Zealand’s parliament has legalised same-sex marriage, the first country in the Asia-Pacific region to do so. Lawmakers approved the bill, amending the 1955 marriage act, despite opposition from Christian lobby groups. The bill was passed with a wide majority, with 77 votes in favour and 44 against. Hundreds of jubilant gay-rights advocates celebrated outside parliament after the bill was passed, calling it a milestone for equality. People watching from the public gallery and some lawmakers immediately broke into song, singing the New Zealand love song “Pokarekare Ana”, AP news agency reported. Some opinion polls have suggested that about two-thirds of New Zealanders support the reform, although others polls suggest the public are more divided. Parliamentarians were allowed a conscience vote, and, crucially, the reform had the backing of both the Prime Minister John Key and leader of the opposition David Shearer, the BBC’s Phil Mercer in Sydney reports. Celebrations have been held in pubs and clubs in the capital Wellington, our correspondent adds. Same-sex civil unions have been legal in New Zealand since 2005. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/worldlast_img read more

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24 Sep
2020

Registration open for ‘Walk to End Alzheimer’s’events

first_imgCincinnati, Oh. — Registration is now open for the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s® is held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide including 12 locations in Indiana, calling on more than 500,000 annual participants of all ages and abilities to help reclaim the future for millions.More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and the only disease among the top 10 causes that cannot be cured, prevented or even slowed. Additionally, more than 16 million friends and family members provide care to people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias in the U.S. In Indiana alone, there are more than 110,000 people living with the disease and 338,000 caregivers.“Because of support from individuals and communities for the Walk to End Alzheimer’s, the Greater Indiana Chapter was able to provide more than 13,000 care and support services last year for Hoosiers living with the disease and their caregivers,” said Alzheimer’s Association Greater Indiana Chapter Executive Natalie Sutton. “In addition, we are working toward advancing public policy and Alzheimer’s and dementia research. Thanks to generous supporters at the 12 Indiana walks, we are able to further the Association’s mission.”Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s participants will complete a walk (lengths vary based on event location) and learn about Alzheimer’s disease, advocacy opportunities, clinical studies enrollment and support programs and services from the Alzheimer’s Association. Walk participants also honor those affected by Alzheimer’s disease with the poignant Promise Garden ceremony.Event Dates and LocationsSaturday, August 25: Liberty Park – Batesville, IndianaSunday, September 9: Central Park – Mishawaka, Ind.Sunday, September 16: City Hall Plaza – Bloomington, Ind.Sunday, September 16: Fairbanks Park Amphitheater – Terre Haute, Ind.Saturday, September 22: Jackson Morrow Park – Kokomo, Ind.Sunday, September 23: Hoosier Park Racing & Casino – Anderson, Ind.Sunday, September 23: Lake County Fairgrounds – Crown Point, Ind.Saturday, September 29: Subaru of Indiana Automotive – Lafayette, Ind.Saturday, September 29: Earlham College – Richmond, Ind.Sunday, September 30: Mill Race Center – Columbus, Ind.Saturday, October 6: Parkview Field – Fort Wayne, Ind.Saturday, October 6: Bankers Life Fieldhouse – Indianapolis, Ind.Saturday, October 6: Washington Park – Michigan City, Ind.last_img read more

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22 Sep
2020

Napoli to splash N27b on Osimhen

first_imgRelatedPosts COVID-19: NCAA to revoke erring airlines licence over non-compliance FRSC to Schools: We’ll arrest, prosecute drivers who flout COVID-19 rules Sanwo-Olu: We’re committed to fulfilling promises to Lagosians Napoli have agreed an initial €60 million (N27 billion) fee with Lille for Victor Osimhen.The Nigeria striker, according to reports, is set to sign a five-year contract and join the Serie A side in the most expensive transfer deal of the summer so far. The 21-year-old scored 18 goals in all competitions for Lille before the French season ended prematurely owing to the COVID-19 pandemic and has been linked with several English clubs, including Manchester United and Liverpool.But Osimhen, who changed agent last week, looks set to move to Napoli after negotiations between the clubs were completed on Thursday.It is understood the fee could rise to €81 million after a number of performance-related add-ons – €1 million more than the African record transfer fee Arsenal paid Lille for the Ivory Coast international Nicolas Pépé last summer.There is also an option to extend Osimhen’s contract by a further year.Lille are expected to step up their efforts to sign Jonathan David having seen a €25 million bid for the Canada striker rejected by Gent this month. The French club have signed 35-year-old Turkey striker Burak Yilmaz in preparation for Osimhen’s departure and have been told they must pay a Belgian record fee of €30 million to secure David.Tags: COVID-19NapoliSerie AVicotr Osimhenlast_img read more

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