20 Jun
2021

Cuban church celebrates 110 years, its final synod before Episcopal…

first_img Rector Bath, NC By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 8, 2019 Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cuba, Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Latin America New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Cuban church celebrates 110 years, its final synod before Episcopal Church reintegration TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church of Cuba clergy and guests gather with Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio outside Holy Trinity Cathedral in Havana following the March 3 closing Eucharist of the 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Havana, Cuba] The Episcopal Church of Cuba recently celebrated its 110-year history during its final synod as an autonomous diocese in anticipation of its official reintegration with the U.S.-based Episcopal Church in 2020.“For 50 years the Episcopal Church has been isolated,” said Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio, at the close of the Feb. 28-March 3 General Synod held at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Havana. Reintegration, she said, “is a way to be part of a big family.”Delgado’s strong leadership drove the reintegration, said Archbishop Fred Hiltz of the Anglican Church of Canada, who serves as chair of the Metropolitan Council of Cuba. The council has overseen the Cuban church since its separation from The Episcopal Church in the late 1960s.Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio and Archbishop Fred Hiltz of the Anglican Church of Canada stand outside Holy Trinity Cathedral in Havana, following the opening Eucharist of the 110th General Synod on Feb. 28. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“I mean every word when I say, she’s a visionary, she’s a hard worker,” said Hiltz, in an interview with Episcopal News Service. “She will do anything to promote the interest, well-being and resource capacity to support the ministry of this church. She’s steadfast, she perseveres, and it’s not always been easy for her.“Not everybody was thrilled with the idea of returning to The Episcopal Church, but she just plodded along consistently, she’s worked with the clergy, the laity. I watched her prepare for the special synod last year to decide what province they would belong to, and just the careful way she made sure there was conversation all the way across the church here in Cuba. They came into the synod with the decision, and that’s a huge credit to her style – organized and focused, spiritually centered leadership.”The Diocese of Cuba is set to join Province II, which includes dioceses from New York and New Jersey in the United States, the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, Haiti and the Virgin Islands.The Cuban church’s reintegration with The Episcopal Church was one of many topics discussed during the synod, which brought together clergy and laity from across the island.“We are indeed so happy to welcome the church in Cuba back into The Episcopal Church; there is so much that we can learn from their creative approach to ministry and mission,” said the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church.The House of Bishops on July 10, 2018, voted unanimously to readmit the Cuban church as a diocese, with the House Deputies concurring. The actions of the 79th General Convention accelerated the reintegration process first set in motion four years ago.Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio leads the recessional following the Feb. 28 Eucharist opening the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIn March 2015, two months after the United States and Cuba agreed to reestablish diplomatic relations following a 54-year breach, the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s synod voted 39 to 33 in favor of returning to the church’s former affiliation with The Episcopal Church. That summer, the 78th General Convention called for closer relations with the Cuban church and a lifting of the decades-long U.S. economic embargo against Cuba.The Rev. John Kafwanka, the Anglican Communion’s director for mission, gives a presentation about the importance of training Christians for ministry in their everyday lives. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Episcopal Church of Cuba traces its origins back to an Anglican presence that began on the island in 1871. In 1901, it became a missionary district of The Episcopal Church. The two churches separated in the 1960s, after Fidel Castro seized power following the 1959 Cuban Revolution and diplomatic relations between the two countries disintegrated. The Episcopal Church of Cuba has functioned as an autonomous diocese of the Anglican Communion under the authority of the Metropolitan Council of Cuba since the separation in 1967. The primates of the Anglican churches of Canada and the West Indies and The Episcopal Church chair the Metropolitan Council.The synod marked the final time Hiltz, who has served as the chair of the Metropolitan Council for 12 years and is set to retire later this year, would attend.“It’s a bit emotional for me, this synod. It is my last synod here as the primate of Canada and the chair of the Metropolitan Council,” he said.“It’s mixed emotions – great joy that things have come thus far. I would have felt really awkward ending my time as the chair of the Metropolitan Council if things hadn’t been as far along in terms of the reintegration,” said Hiltz. “It’s been just really wonderful to watch that process unfold since 2015. I’m really happy to see it coming to fruition and to think that at next year’s synod, their presiding bishop will be here because they have sometimes spoken of me as their primate. And I guess for all intents and purposes I have been.”Pending alignment of the Cuban and the U.S.-based Episcopal Church’s constitutions and canons and signoff from the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, next March, the Diocese of Cuba will hold its first convention along with a celebration and visit from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.The Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church, gave a presentation on March 2 about next steps in the process of reintegration during the 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“We are deeply thankful to Archbishop Hiltz, to the Metropolitan Council (of Cuba) and the Anglican Church of Canada for their years of faithful partnership and support to the church in Cuba,” said Robertson.Delgado was installed in November 2010. Prior to that, Bishop Miguel Tamayo of the Anglican Church of Uruguay served the church as an interim bishop for six years, splitting his time between Montevideo and Havana. Bishops from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic have also served in that role; both Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are Episcopal Church dioceses in Province IX.On Feb. 27, The Episcopal Church announced a campaign to raise pension funds for retired and active clergy in the Episcopal Church of Cuba. The average priest’s salary in Cuba is $55 per month; the Cuban government doesn’t recognize religious employment, rendering clergy ineligible for state pensions or social security. Over the last 50 years, clergy have had to forgo pensions. The establishment of a pension system provides some security to clergy who can now rely on the church into old age, said Delgado.The Cuban church has 23 clergy members serving 10,000 Episcopalians in 46 congregations and missions across the island. At the time of the official announcement, The Episcopal Church already had raised more than half of the targeted one-time amount of $800,000. The money, to be managed by the Church Pension Fund, makes up for the absence of contributions during the separation and addresses an injustice.“This is part of the work of reconciliation, bringing us together across historic divides. This is not just fundraising; it’s following Jesus and finding our way back to each other,” said Curry, in a press release.During the church’s February Executive Council meeting, Curry referred to the pensions campaign and the Church of Cuba’s return to The Episcopal Church as an act of “reconciliation no matter what our governments do.” The Obama administration attempted to open relations between the U.S. and Cuban governments; before President Donald Trump’s election, travel restrictions imposed on American citizens were relaxed. In 2017, Trump restored the restrictions.– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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17 Jun
2021

House G / HPSA

first_img “COPY” Year:  Photographs Save this picture!© Dietmar Hammerschmid+ 17 Share House G / HPSA photographs:  Dietmar HammerschmidPhotographs:  Dietmar HammerschmidSave this picture!© Dietmar HammerschmidText description provided by the architects. This house, which is located in the northern part of Austria, was clearly divided into two sections:Save this picture!© Dietmar HammerschmidThe open living space where the family enjoys to receive guests and the retreat area in the basement, which is lighted via a courtyard.Save this picture!Ground Floor PlanThe living area on the ground floor was designed as a timber structure. Wooden lamellar shaped columns prevent insights from the neighboring properties, but do not restrict the great views of the surrounding hills.Save this picture!© Dietmar HammerschmidThe design of the suspended stairs corresponds with the bearing wood structure and enables light incidence from the small courtyard to the bathroom in the basement.Save this picture!Section CAll bedrooms have direct access to the garden and a covered terrace. The greened flat roof prevents overheating of the bedrooms in summer.Save this picture!© Dietmar HammerschmidProject gallerySee allShow lessRIBA Launches Centenery Square Regeneration Competition for BirminghamArchitecture NewsFrank Gehry Claims Today’s Architecture is (Mostly) “Pure Shit”Architecture News Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/557052/house-in-austria-hpsa Clipboard Houses House G / HPSASave this projectSaveHouse G / HPSA ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/557052/house-in-austria-hpsa Clipboard Architects: HPSA Area Area of this architecture project CopyHouses•Gramastetten, Austria Year:  2012 2012 Projects ArchDaily Area:  150 m² Area:  150 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Austria “COPY” CopyAbout this officeHPSAOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesGramastettenHousesAustriaPublished on October 24, 2014Cite: “House G / HPSA” 24 Oct 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogFaucetshansgroheKitchen Mixers – Aquno Select M81Vinyl Walls3MVinyl Finishes in HealthPartners Regions HospitalPartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsCoffee tablesBoConceptMadrid Coffee Table AD19SkylightsLAMILUXFlat Roof Exit Comfort DuoMetallicsTrimoMetal Panels for Roofs – Trimoterm SNVSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Iron Moss – Iron CollectionCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Facade in Manchester HospitalWoodBlumer LehmannConsulting and Engineering in Wood ProjectsGlassBendheimLuminous Mirrored GlassWire MeshTwentinoxMetal Mesh – Golf Romeo 7More products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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16 Jun
2021

Norwich Union and NCH win Make A Difference Day Award

first_imgNorwich Union and NCH are in partnership to provide socially-excluded youngpeople with the help they need to reach their potential. Norwich Union isinvesting £1.4 million into the partnership over a five-year period. Itforms part of a larger Norwich Union sponsorship programme aimed atinvesting in the future of our children. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Norwich Union and NCH win Make A Difference Day Award AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Norwich Union and children’s charity NCH have won the Community Service Volunteers (CSV) Make A Difference Day Awards after winning the best employee team volunteering event.A team of 50 volunteers from Norwich Union’s Life Telebusiness area transformed a garden using ideas put forward by the youngcarers at the NCH Willows project in King’s Lynn, Norfolk. They created a quiet area with flower beds and a sea scene mural where the children and young people can relax. David Czerwinski, head of community at Norwich Union, said: “The employee volunteering programme, part of our ‘Young Lives, Our Future’ partnership with NCH, is all about giving employees the opportunity to make a difference in their local community, which fits well with the aims of CSV’s Make a Difference Day.” Advertisementcenter_img Tagged with: Awards Volunteering Howard Lake | 31 March 2004 | News  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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16 Jun
2021

Security Foiling chooses Mercy Ships as charity of the year

first_img Independent experts in foil and hologram security, Security Foiling Ltd, has chosen Mercy Ships as its charity of choice for this year.To launch the partnership, Mercy Ships attended the Security Document World 2011 conference alongside Security Foiling, where the charity addressed delegates on the work of Mercy Ships at an evening event. Donations were received from fundraising activities which took place at the conference.Mark Filby, Operations Manager of Security Foiling, said: “We are delighted to partner with Mercy Ships as we have strong business interests in Africa. When we first heard about the charity’s work in Africa we felt an instant connection to the cause and really wanted to help. Africa is one of our biggest export markets and this partnership is the perfect opportunity for us to give something back. We also have a personal connection to the charity through one of our employees, Marcel Djogo from Togo, whose father’s sight was restored after receiving a cataract operation on the Africa Mercy when the ship visited the country last year”.www.mercyships.org.uk Tagged with: charity of the year corporate Security Foiling chooses Mercy Ships as charity of the year Howard Lake | 7 April 2011 | News  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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13 Jun
2021

Fans enjoy pregame activities at the Alamodome

first_imgWorld Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Kelsey Ritchie Kelsey Ritchiehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kelsey-ritchie/ Kelsey Ritchiehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kelsey-ritchie/ A family of TCU fans poses in the rain in the FanZone outside the Alamodome. Video: cello ensemble closes out semester with winter concert Photo booths and props give fans the chance to show their school pride. Kelsey Ritchiehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kelsey-ritchie/ Photo booths allow fans to capture memories at the Fan Zone. Kelsey Ritchiehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kelsey-ritchie/ Kelsey Ritchie is a junior Political Science and Journalism double major from Tulsa, OK. She is currently serving as the Student Organizations line editor. Fans show off their pride and new hats at the TCU tent in the Fan Zone. Previous articleFrogs, Ducks both have San Antonio connectionsNext articleFrogs down 31-0 at halftime Kelsey Ritchie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Facebook The Fan Zone welcomes fans of all ages before the Alamo Bowl gets underway. ReddIt ReddIt Fans weather the rain to enjoy pregame festivities at the Alamo Bowl. An Oregon fan enjoys the face painting booth at the Fan Zone outside of the Alamodome. Facepainting booths provide fans of all ages a chance to show their spirit. Games such as the ball toss, frisbee and corn hole provide entertainment for children at the Fan Zone. TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history TCU vs Baylor in Photos Twitter Website| + posts Despite the rain, fans show off their school pride at the Fan Zone outside of the Alamodome. Linkedin Fans have the chance to pose with both TCU and Oregon helmets in a Photo Booth in the Fan Zone. The Fan Zone, located right outside of the Alamodome, gives fans a chance to gear up for the game. Coozies and buttons decorate tables at the Fan Zone. TCU fans enjoy food and beverages inside a tent at the Fan Zone. The Fan Zone, located outside of the Alamodome, provides fans with food, free goodies and fun. Fans show their spirit with TCU ponchos at the Fan Zone. TCU and Oregon fans enjoy the Fan Zone and friendly competition. Homelessness brought home A family of TCU fans poses in the rain in the FanZone outside the Alamodome. Linkedin print Rwandan students host commemoration Facebook Fans enjoy San Antonio Tex Mex at the Fan Zone. Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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12 Jun
2021

US – #WeeklyAddress: November 19 – November 25: White House releases new press guidelines after restoring Jim Acosta’s press pass

first_img White House releases new press guidelines after restoring Jim Acosta’s press passCNN dropped its lawsuit against the White House on November 19 after White House officials informed the network it would restore Chief White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press pass so long as he abides by a new set of press conference rules. White House reporters have expressed concerns about the White House’s attempts to dictate how they carry out their jobs. For more information, read RSF’s press release on the incident. April 28, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say The United States ranks 45th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index after falling 2 places in the last year. Organisation Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists Mississippi Senator demanded no audience or press attend Senate debate November 26, 2018 US – #WeeklyAddress: November 19 – November 25: White House releases new press guidelines after restoring Jim Acosta’s press pass Below are the most notable incidents regarding threats to press freedom in the US during the week of November 19 – November 25: SAUL LOEB / AFP For the latest updates, follow RSF on twitter @RSF_en. United StatesAmericas center_img News United StatesAmericas President Trump criticizes “Fake 60 Minutes” for reporting “phony story” on family separation Republican Mississippi Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith demanded there be no audience or outside press at a US Senate debate for the Mississippi runoff election on November 20. According to the Jackson Free Press, Hyde-Smith only wanted the debate moderator, panelists and production team present as she faced off against Democratic candidate Mike Espy for a seat in the Senate. In a public statement, Espy’s communications director said: “The Espy campaign fought for access and transparency for tonight’s debate. Cindy Hyde-Smith has limited access for the press and for the people of Mississippi at every step of her campaign.” Hyde-Smith also requested and was granted other accommodations, to which an anonymous source for the Jackson Free Press alleged that the debate was essentially “rigged for her to win.” Nonetheless, journalists were granted access to the debate and had the opportunity to ask follow-up questions. Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says Follow the news on United States June 3, 2021 Find out more News News President Donald Trump attacked a “60 Minutes” investigation on November 25 for reporting what he called a “phony story” on child separation at the US-Mexico border. The investigation found the administration’s family separations had been going for longer than previously thought. In the first of two tweets, the president accused the “60 Minutes” investigation of including a photo of “children in jails,” also used by “other Fake Media,” dating back to the Obama administration. According to The Washington Post, Trump was likely referencing a 2014 Associated Press photo that was shared after his policy was first made public. “60 Minutes” did not use this photo. In the second tweet, he wrote that former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush had also separated children from their families “because that is policy and law” and proceeded to call the segment “Fake 60 Minutes.” As president, Obama separated families under different circumstances and did not enforce a “zero tolerance” policy. President Trump has since been widely criticized. The program’s executive editor Bill Owens told The Washington Post that “we stand by our story.” The president has frequently referred to news outlets that have criticized him and his administration as “fake.” to go further June 7, 2021 Find out more RSF_en last_img read more

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2 Jun
2021

Ector County Courthouse, adult probation office phones down

first_img Pinterest The Ector County Courthouse offices and adult probation offices are experiencing phone system troubles, Ector County Judge Ron Eckert said Tuesday.As of Tuesday afternoon, it was unclear as to when phones would be up and reliable again at county courthouse offices.In the meantime, Eckert encouraged members of the public who can’t get through the phone lines to come to the offices in person, if needed, or to try to connect with an official through email.“We’re waiting on some information from our IT department, just trying to get some answers for us to consider some real options,” Eckert said Tuesday afternoon. “Our phone system is getting pretty old, and we were trying to make do with it for a while.”Eckert said officials were working diligently on the issue. A release sent from his office Tuesday apologized to the public for any inconveniences.Offices are still operating during normal hours, for those who may have had reasons to call but can make it to the offices in person instead.“Unfortunately, that’s kind of where we’re at. It’s kind of how things are,” Eckert said. “To the extent, if they also have questions on email — if they need to speak with a public official and there’s an email address available, they’re welcome to send it that way as well.”More Information Previous articleDAILY OIL PRICE: March 27Next articleOPD: Officers arrest man after sister choked admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – March 27, 2018 WhatsApp Pinterest Church leaders condemn mayor’s disparaging comments WhatsApp Landgraf prepares for state budget debate Facebook Ector County website. Facebook Local NewsGovernment Ector County Courthouse, adult probation office phones down Twitter Twitter Home Local News Government Ector County Courthouse, adult probation office phones down Landgraf staffer resigns following investigation A photo of the south west side of the Ector County Courthouse on Wednesday from the intersection of 3rd Street and Grant Avenue. Virgin Coco MojitoSmoked Bacon Wrapped French Vidalia OnionSummer Spaghetti SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

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24 May
2021

Plein air artists find inspiration indoors

first_img Latest Stories Email the author Sponsored Content Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration You Might Like Photo/Jaine Treadwell Jennifer Taylor (above), a plein air artist, conducted a workshop along with fellow artist Timothy Joe Saturday for the Johnson Center for the Arts. “Rapidly painting and sketching this way was a challenge and stretch,” Drinkwater said. “It allowed us the opportunity to explore our craft in a different way.”Twelve-year-old Sadie Holbert with came with her art teacher.“I texted Sadie on Saturday morning and asked if she’d like to join me,” Drinkwater said. “She quickly grabbed her sketchbook.  She did an excellent job and it was fun to bring her along. I don’t think she had ever gone to something like this before but I think she loved it just as much as I did.” Drinkwater said the en plain air event was a great day with like minded artists.“I don’t think anyone felt like their work was final or complete when we wrapped up the afternoon,” she said. “But it was  an excellent opportunity to explore the process. Sometimes we get bogged down with trying to make a finished piece and we forget to play along the way. Saturday was a  great time for that with very little expectation of our artwork being final. For me and a lot of artists, it is always more about the journey and process than perfection.  It was fun to learn from other artists, the ones sitting next to me and the ones demonstrating their technique and process.”For local artist Kitty Smothers, the workshop was a “awesome” opportunity to be with others who love making art, too.“I learned so much about depth and value,” Smothers said. “When I paint, I can’t really verbalize how I do it; I just paint what I see and feel. I needed a refresher on color theory and color harmony and they pushed me to think in new ways. “Smothers said Taylor and Joe were inspiring.“And,  I love that they freely shared their time and tips with us.,” Smothers said. “It really makes me excited to keep getting out there and learning all I can.” Edith Smith was one of the novice artists at the workshop.Although she has had no formal training in art, her mother was talented and traces her love of art back to her mom. “I was happy to have the opportunity to get doing art,” Smith said. “I love art; it’s rewarding. I was happy to have the opportunity to attend the workshop. Most everything was new to me and I learned from the professional artists and from others as well.”Smith said she discovered she has a natural instinct for art.“But I need to know more and understand more and keep trying to get better,” she said. “I hope the Johnson Center willhold  other opportunities for us to come to gather to learn. And, I like to paint fast and get it done. And was proud of what I did and it inspired me to paint more.” Next UpKitty Smothers threw the gauntlet en plain air “Paint like you don’t care,” Smothers said as she moved her brush quickly across the canvas.Kristy Drinkwater, laughed as she”detailed” the red-headed wood pecker on her canvas. Patriots take on Tuscaloosa Academy for AISA title The Pike Liberal Arts Patriots will play for a state championship for the second consecutive season Wednesday afternoon beginning at… read more Just as the professional artists are different is style and technique, so were those who participated in the workshop. But, as Taylor and Joe reminded them, there is no right or wrong in art, just different.Drinkwater is an artist and also a teacher of art. She was at the workshop to learn.“It was wonderful to do something fun on a rainy and cold Saturday,” Drinkwater said. “Gathering at The Studio was an excellent way to spend  the  afternoon drawing and painting alongside other artists.” Collectively, the participants worked on quick studies without a lot of time to plan or paint. Plein air artists find inspiration indoorscenter_img By The Penny Hoarder The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Even though the weather didn’t cooperate with the plans for the Johnson Center for the Arts’ En Plein Air event on Saturday, the workshop inside The Studio could not have been better, said Brenda Campbell, JCA director.“Jennifer Taylor and Timothy Joe are amazing professional artists and shared their knowledge and talents so freely,” Campbell said. “We were fortunate to have them conduct the workshop. Watching them at their craft was an entertaining and learning experience. It was amazing to see these noted artists painting, discussing new techniques and encouraging the participants to be open to new ideas and ways of painting.”The ages of the participants in the en plain air workshop ranged from six to the golden ages and, surprisingly they learned from each other as well as from Taylor and Joe. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day By Jaine Treadwell Published 9:45 pm Tuesday, February 16, 2021 Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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18 May
2021

Trial set for Sandy Hook families, gun-maker Remington over school massacre

first_imgiStock(NEW YORK) — A Connecticut judge has set a trial date for families of victims of the Sandy Hook school massacre to face the manufacturer whose guns were used in the deadly 2012 shooting.The trial is set to take place September 2021, nearly a decade after 20-year-old Adam Lanza stormed into the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, with a Remington Bushmaster AR-15 and killed 26 people, including 20 students. The tragedy is one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history.The relatives of nine victims and one survivor filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Remington Arms in 2015, accusing the country’s oldest gun-maker of illegally marketing the military-style semiautomatic weapon to at-risk young men.“After nearly five years of legal maneuvering by Remington, we will finally discover what went on behind closed doors that led to the company’s reckless marketing of the Bushmaster AR-15,” Josh Koskoff, a lawyer for the victims, told Reuters in a statement. “The families’ faith in the legal system has never wavered and they look forward to presenting their case to a Connecticut jury.”The 2021 trial date was decided after nearly two hours of talks between attorneys on both sides of the argument. Connecticut’s top court ruled that the families could sue Remington back in March.The North Carolina-based company filed an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court last month, but the court declined to hear the appeal.Remington did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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18 May
2021

New stage in coaching

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. New stage in coachingOn 1 Nov 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Dawn Swarbrick, HR manager for Railtrack Southern, on a behavioural programme that is having a significant impact on the businessIn common with many industries, the rail industry had placed technical expertise higher on the agenda than people management skills and there was a clear need to develop the overall management style, culture and individual level of capability. This became particularly apparent in a Railtrack Southern executive attitude survey in 1999, which highlighted the development needs of first-line managers. We decided to initiate and develop a comprehensive management development programme. Interaction was brought in to design and deliver the programme in close partnership with our HR department. It was aimed at 75 frontline managers and broken down into seven modules: Managing change, Customers, Finance, People, Projects, Self, Managing safety. The Managing People module has been very well received and we feel it deserves particular attention for its refreshing and innovative approach.The module was designed to help participants get the best out of people in a variety of one-to-one situations. While there are a great many policies and procedures to support managers in these situations, we wanted to make the main emphasis of the programme behavioural. In my experience, it is only through the understanding and use of appropriate behaviours that the policies can be effectively applied.With an experiential approach to learning, Interaction achieved the behavioural focus by using trained actors, and role-play scenarios that were taken from the working environment. We believe it is this challenging approach that has led to such positive results. We asked everyone involved for feedback on their experience.Facilitator’s view”Using actors was invaluable – it made my job much easier,” says interaction facilitator Lucy Neale. “With no personal histories to worry about or time wasted in ‘getting into character’, it focuses participants solely on the learning. “We had organised for the actors to spend a day in the participants’ working environment prior to the programme and it had clearly paid off.”Their skill in operating on an emotional level and responding with subtlety brought a refreshing sense of clarity and credibility to the training.”The actors were free to challenge participants and ease them out of their comfort zone. “It allowed me to concentrate entirely on observing and giving high-quality feedback. I had a clearer vision and flexibility when it came to initiating time-outs, re-runs and on-the-spot coaching.”Neale praises one of the actors, Neil Bett. “Participants valued his input – the aura of a stranger interacting at such an emotional, human level has a certain mystique and engenders respect,” she says.Actor’s viewAccording to Bett, having facilitators is a great support because they have an objective overview. “Lucy’s role was crucial as she held the balance between the actor and the participant. My role was to operate on a purely emotionally honest level,” he says.”I encouraged participants to be themselves as well as challenging their behaviour. I was direct and personal. “Lucy had a clear understanding of my approach and supported the direct responses I gave to participants. She then provided a context for participants to explore feedback, taking it further to make it relevant to their working situation.”Although Bett is briefed on his character beforehand, it is the way he acts that makes for credibility. He sees feedback as crucial. “As a trained actor, I am comfortable being direct and honest about how I feel. I am also in a special position in that I am an ‘outside’ voice, so I can say things that colleagues might not feel so comfortable in saying. “Speaking from direct experience of an individual added yet more weight and credibility to the feedback. For example, I could comment on a participant’s particular attitude from my direct experience of them during the role-play,” he says.”We could then re-run the scenario, with the participant having an understanding of their behaviour and its effect on others.”Participant’s view”The actors were brilliant,” says participant Mick Hamill. “I’ve done a lot of management training, and role playing with actors is so much more real. “Because the actors reacted naturally to whatever we presented them with, it really made me think. Neil was very honest and no-one got away with being half-hearted. The range of emotional responses Neil covered was very powerful. From aggression to tears, we had to deal with everything.”Having the chance to act out scenarios that I am dealing with at work is so valuable.” Hamill cites the example of a colleague who has been a manager for a number of years. “He received feedback that he needed to focus more on listening. He has since had to do a welfare visit and was thanked afterwards for his understanding attitude.”Hamill thinks the effect on himself is remarkable. “I started as a manager a year ago and at first my attitude was very heavy handed – as I now see it. I went in initially concerned only with getting the job done and I wasn’t aware of the effect this was having on people.”I’ve since had to deal with a number of serious situations affecting people that I manage, and I am so much more able to listen and understand.”Interaction comes up with the goodsWe wanted to make each module of our core management skills programme stand out as special. We trusted that Interaction would come up with some creative ideas – and they did. We were a little concerned initially about using actors in the Managing People module – in terms of how they would be managed and whether sufficient control could be maintained. However, Interaction handled a potentially sensitive situation with great care. Managing People was designed specifically for us – as were all the modules – and it was a particularly valuable module because it focused on real situations within the business. Interaction paid great attention to detail to the extent that the actors spent time in our working environment where they picked up our culture and behaviours perfectly. What stood out above all was the level of realism that using trained actors achieved. At ease with being emotional and direct, they pushed people through their comfort zones but without stepping too far over the line.The Managing People module has significantly enhanced confidence levels, with managers now dealing much more effectively with challenging situations.Interaction worked with a local professional acting company, Barking Productions, for the role play and the Interaction facilitators were Adrian Bennett, Nigel Denning and Lucy Neale.On test – Managing People as one module of the Railtrack Southern Core Management Skills Programme. Designed and delivered by: Interaction Development & Learning, The Old Chapel, Fairview Drive, Redland, Bristol BS6 6PH, Tel: 0117 924 8030, Fax: 0870 168 0556, Web link: www.othergroup.co.uk/interaction Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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