9 May
2021

Multi-year observations on the gametogenic ecology of the Antarctic seastar Odontaster validus

first_imgThis study reports the first multi-year observations on the reproductive patterns for an Antarctic predator/scavenger, Odontaster validus (Koehler 1912). Seastars were collected monthly from a shallow site (15–20 m depth) near the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Rothera Research Station (Adelaide Island, 67°34′S 68°08′W) from July 1997 to January 2001. Reproductive condition, oocyte size frequencies and spermatogenesis were examined in at least ten seastars each month using histological and image analysis techniques. Gonad indices (GI) and pyloric caeca indices (PI) were also examined in the same samples. Female and male GIs varied seasonally, in parallel with a reduction in the proportion of large oocytes and mature sperm in the gonad in August to mid-October following winter spawning. Despite there being remarkable consistency in the timing of spawning from year to year, differences in the reproductive condition of individuals were apparent. Patterns in the digestive tissues also varied with season, peaking in December and reaching a minimum in February in two of the three study years. This weaker annual pattern may partly reflect the varied diet of this predator/scavenger species, which is not directly dependant on the timing and magnitude of the annual phytoplankton bloom. Pooled oocyte size distributions and residual analysis suggested that oogenesis progressed over 18–24 months, with the largest of the two size classes (maximum diameter = 183 μm) being spawned annually. This pattern of oocyte growth and spawning was previously reported in the early 1960s for an O. validus population from McMurdo Sound, which lies south of Rothera by 10° latitude. The extremely catholic diet of this predator/scavenger suggests the reproductive patterns of the seastar will be less susceptible to changes in food supply compared to polar suspension feeders or deposit feeders.last_img read more

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9 May
2021

Images as proximity sensors: the incidence of conspecific foraging in Antarctic fur seals

first_imgBackgroundAlthough there have been recent advances in the development of animal-attached ‘proximity’ tags to remotely record the interactions of multiple individuals, the efficacy of these devices depends on the instrumentation of sufficient animals that subsequently have spatial interactions. Among densely colonial mammals such as fur seals, this remains logistically difficult, and interactions between animals during foraging have not previously been recorded. ResultsWe collected data on conspecific interactions during diving at sea using still image and video cameras deployed on 23 Antarctic fur seals. Animals carried cameras for a total of 152 days, collecting a total of 38,098 images and 369 movies (total time 7.35 h). Other fur seals were detected in 74 % of deployments, with a maximum of five seals detected in a single image (n = 122 images, 28 videos). No predators other than conspecifics were detected. Detection was primarily limited by light conditions, since conspecifics were usually further from each other than the 1-m range illuminated by camera flash under low light levels. Other seals were recorded at a range of depths (average 27 ± 14.3 m, max 66 m). Linear mixed models suggested a relationship between conspecific observations per dive and the number of krill images recorded per dive. In terms of bouts of dives, other seals were recorded in five single dives (of 330) and 28 bouts of dives <2 min apart (of 187). Using light conditions as a proxy for detectability, other seals were more likely to be observed at the bottom of dives than during descent or ascent. Seals were also more likely to be closer to each other and oriented either perpendicular or opposing each other at the bottom of dives, and in the same or opposite direction to each other during ascent. ConclusionsThese results are contrary to animal-attached camera observations of penguin foraging, suggesting differing group-foraging tactics for these marine predators. Group foraging could have consequences for models linking predator behaviour to prey field densities since this relationship may be affected by the presence of multiple predators at the same patch.last_img read more

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4 May
2021

Lockheed Martin Delivers MUOS to US Navy

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy Authorities June 4, 2015 View post tag: MUOS View post tag: News by topic Following successful completion of on-orbit testing, the U.S. Navy accepted the third Lockheed Martin-built Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite.Launched January 20, MUOS-3 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals can seamlessly connect around the globe, beyond line-of-sight, with new smart phone-like capabilities, including simultaneous and crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, on a high-speed Internet Protocol-based system.With on-orbit testing complete, MUOS-3 is being relocated to its on-orbit operational slot in preparation for operational acceptance.The MUOS network is expected to provide near global coverage before year end. MUOS-1 and MUOS-2, launched respectively in 2012 and 2013, are already operational and providing high-quality voice communications. Lockheed Martin handed over the last of four required ground stations to the Navy in February. MUOS-4 is expected to launch later this year.Image: Lockheed Martin Back to overview,Home naval-today Lockheed Martin Delivers MUOS to US Navy View post tag: americas Lockheed Martin Delivers MUOS to US Navy View post tag: US Navy View post tag: Lockheed Martin Share this articlelast_img read more

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4 May
2021

Chilean icebreaker getting Finnish electromagnetic kits

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Chilean icebreaker Antartica 1 getting Finnish electromagnetic kits Chilean icebreaker Antartica 1 getting Finnish electromagnetic kits View post tag: Chilean Navy February 8, 2019, by View post tag: ASMAR navaltoday Chilean ivebreaker Antarctica 1 will feature electromagnetic compatibility and interference equipment from Finland’s Surma, under a contract awarded by prime contractor ASMAR.Surma will assist ASMAR throughout the multiyear project managing the EMC working group of the Antartica 1 project.The Finnish company’s topside design tool is designed to ease the electromagnetic interference and line of sight analysis of sensor and transmitter positioning by retrieving all the information straight from the design product model.“In the current paradigm of wireless sensors and wireless information retrieval and communication systems, the right approach to on-board signal propagation within a vessel is a crucial question to maximize the valuable time of researchers and the overall efficiency of the icebreaker,” Kristian Tornivaara, Surma CEO, commented.Chile’s Antarctica 1 is an LRS -Polar 5 Class vessel designed in collaboration with VARD Canada and scheduled for delivery in 2021. A maiden voyage to Antarctic Polar Circle is expected to take place in 2023.Antarctica 1 will replace the icebreaker Contraalmirante Oscar Viel Toro which is nearing the end of its useful service life.Once built, the 111-meter vessel will undertake roles that include logistic support, search and rescue (SAR) and scientific research south from the Antarctic Polar Circle. The operation period shall be at least eight months per year in the vicinity of Alejandro Island.The vessel will be capable of operating in icy waters, navigating continuously at a constant speed of 3 knots over a 500 kPa flexural strength ice of 1-meter thickness and covered with a 20-centimeter layer of snow. View post tag: Antarctica I View post tag: Surma Authorities Share this articlelast_img read more

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3 May
2021

Awesome Oxford break tabs

first_imgDark Blue power and rhythm prove too much for Cambridge as last year’s defeat is forgotten “Our game plan was to go 100% all the way, and we executed it to perfection.” This was strokeman Andy Triggs Hodge’s summary of Oxford’s exceptional performance to win the 151st Boat Race. Up against an eight considered by the Cambridge camp to be their best ever crew, Oxford showed the value of performing on the day. They produced their most techincally efficient row of the season, allowing them to harness their huge power to defeat by two lengths a gutsy Cambridge crew that could not live with the Dark Blues’ devastating bursts of speed.Oxford got off to an excellent start, setting up a powerful rhythm within the first five strokes. Cambridge, hindered by a messy first stroke in which Tom James’ oar missed the water, found themselves two-thirds of a length behind after 90 seconds. With their tidy rhythm established and the Middlesex Bend working to their advantage, they quickly recovered to make a long push to pull alongside Oxford by the Mile Post.After two minutes of tense side by side rowing, Oxford made their move. With the long Surrey Bend looming, the Dark Blues put in a powerful burst through Hammersmith Bridge to gain a length lead. As the Surrey Bend began to work in Oxford’s favour, Cambridge were forced to sprint to avoid allowing Dark Blue cox, Acer Nethercott, to steer his eight directly in front of the Cambridge crew.After allowing the Surrey Bend to drain the Light Blues’ energy for over four minutes, Oxford made the killer blow. At Chiswick Steps, they put in another massive burst; Cambridge, who had spent eight of the race’s ten minutes trying to claw back Dark Blue leads, found they had nothing left to give. 10:50 into the race, Nethercott had enough of a lead to cut across Cambridge – it was all over for the Light Blues. The Chiswick Bend they had hoped to use in the closing stages was rendered irrelevant: out in front, Oxford could take the same tight line the Light Blues would follow. Worse still, Cambridge were now rowing in Oxford’s wake, the balance and run of their boat upset by the dirty water stirred by the Dark Blue oars.Though Cambridge maintained their technique admirably, Oxford could now see their opponents behind them as they stretched their lead to the finish. When an elated Oxford crew crossed the finish line, Cambridge were two lengths behind.Robin Bourne-Taylor, Oxford’s President, said, “The key was the rhythm off the start. The boat felt really comfortable and this allowed us to turn on the pressure at decisive points.” Bernd Heidiger, Cambridge’s stroke, said that while his crew’s early rhythm was “nearly perfect. We were never comfortable, because we were always under pressure from Oxford”. Light Blue coach Robin Williams commended Oxford, saying, “Oxford rowed tactically extremely well. They kept pushing and pushing, and eventually we couldn’t hold them back any more. All credit to Oxford – we couldn’t have done any more.”Just before the Blue Boat race, Cambridge’s reserve boat Goldie recorded a crushing five length victory over Isis, its Oxford counterpart. After an evenly matched start, Goldie settled into a cruising speed which was markedly quicker than Isis’. The Light Blues pulled away and, aside from a brief Isis fight back around the Surrey bend, never stopped extending their lead. Their time of 16:48 smashed ten seconds off the course record for the reserve race. Isis 6 man David Livingstone, a winner of the Blue Boat race in 2003, said, “We have to concede they were the better crew.”ARCHIVE: 0th week TT 2005last_img read more

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20 Apr
2021

Press release: New UK-wide methodology agreed to record COVID-19 deaths

first_imgBackground informationIn England, a new weekly set of figures will also be published, showing the number of deaths that occur within 60 days of a positive test. Deaths that occur after 60 days will also be added to this figure if COVID-19 appears on the death certificate. This will provide an additional measure of the impact of the disease over time.This follows concerns raised by academics from the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine about the original measure, which counted anyone who had ever tested positive as a COVID-associated death. They called for the introduction of a 21-day measure in order to accurately assess the impact of the virus on mortality rates. The way we count deaths in people with COVID-19 in England was originally chosen to avoid underestimating deaths caused by the virus in the early stages of the pandemic. Our analysis of the long-term impact of the infection now allows us to move to new methods, which will give us crucial information about both recent trends and overall mortality burden due to COVID-19. New methodology introduced following urgent review Deaths in people with COVID-19 that occurred within 28 days of testing positive will be published daily The approach, endorsed by the four UK Chief Medical Officers, will be used by all 4 UK nationscenter_img The 4 UK Chief Medical Officers have recommended that a single, consistent measure is adopted for daily reporting of deaths across the UK. The UK government and the devolved administrations have agreed to publish the number of deaths that occurred within 28 days of a positive lab-confirmed COVID test result on a daily basis.This will provide accurate data on the immediate impact of recent epidemic activity.The methodology has been peer reviewed by independent academics to ensure that the best possible indicators are used, and that the methods are applied consistently across the nations of the UK.PHE and the devolved administrations have worked closely with the UK Statistics Authority on these new measures and the new approach is in line with advice from the statistics regulator.In their review, Public Health England considered epidemiological evidence to see how likely it was that COVID-19 was a contributory factor to a death at different points in time after a positive test.Analysis of data in England found 96% of deaths occurred within 60 days or had COVID-19 on the death certificate. 88% of deaths occurred within 28 days.As of Wednesday August 12, the number of all deaths in patients testing positive for COVID-19 in the UK within 28 days was 41,329.Professor John Newton, Director of Health Improvement at Public Health England, said:last_img read more

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1 Mar
2021

My 21 years in Cambridge

first_img Related A student who calls two coasts home learns to bridge the gulf I am now in my eighth year of walking through Harvard Yard every morning on my way to class. And in many ways, this walk has remained the same. I will always be overdressed or underdressed for the changeable Cambridge weather, whose whims I still cannot predict. And I will always be rushing, my sense of time forever thrown off by the five minutes tacked onto the 8 a.m. start time of high school or the seven-minute grace period I now get in college. I pass the same brick buildings and dodge the same groups of tourists while clutching the same coffee from the Starbucks by the Red Line.When I first moved into Hollis Hall for dorm crew, carrying hastily packed belongings from my parent’s house in West Cambridge — 10 minutes away by car and 30 on foot — this impending sense of sameness had weighed me down. College had always been pitched to me as a transformative experience, where everything would be new and surprising and challenging. I had imagined that I would move at least a state away from home, to navigate the roads into New York City on move-in day, or the particularities of muggy weather in Washington, D.C., or the greener and quieter landscapes of Vermont.This move to a new place, far enough away from my parents and high school friends and familiar sights to trigger something new in me too, was supposed to mark my first big step toward adulthood. It was in the process of moving and the experience of living somewhere else that I believed growth could happen. By comparison, staying in Cambridge seemed like a sentence to stagnation. Finding comfort at home and here The image of college as a place defined by its students’ experience of newness — surprise roommates in unknown dorm housing in an unfamiliar college town — is ingrained not just in my own imagination, but in the culture as well. This cultural imagination is predominantly an American one laced through with geography. My cousin in the Czech Republic, who grew up in Prague, did not expect a big move when he entered university two years before me. The best school for his interest in translation was Charles University, also located in Prague, and the best housing option for his student budget was his own childhood bedroom. For him, the prospect of spending his university years in the same city where he had spent his high school years did not entail existential angst. But the vastness and variety of the United States had been imprinted in my imagination, not his, and the need to explore new corners of this place was one I couldn’t shake no matter how happy he seemed to be at home.I entered the Yard that first day through Johnston Gate with a single heavy backpack in tow and a friend along to say goodbye. In those first few familiar steps, there was no trace of the trepidation I had wanted to feel on my first day at college. My parents hadn’t come to see me off, being at work and having no doubt they would see me again within a few days — or whenever they wanted, for the next four years. But after my friend turned to walk back through the gate and I turned toward the enthusiastic upperclassmen beaming at me from behind a makeshift “Welcome to Dorm Crew!” sign, this sense of comfort suddenly disappeared. I was lost, in the same Yard where I had spent so many late afternoons lounging with friends from high school. The dorm crew captains who handed me my keys began to steer me toward Hollis with gentle smiles reserved for round-eyed, new freshmen from far away, and I didn’t stop them. I had no idea where Hollis was.My sense of displacement in a physical space I thought I knew so well would continue for the first few months I lived at Harvard. Mostly, I felt as though someone had blindfolded me and spun me in endless circles before releasing me in the middle of Harvard Square, which now wobbled out of focus, presenting new topsy-turvy dimensions wherever I looked. Every morning that I looked out from my window in Pennypacker Hall to see the back of the Old Cambridge Baptist Church was an exercise in balancing two different worlds inside my head. This was the same church I used to pass on trips to BerryLine or walks to Central Square, part of the backdrop of high school years spent exploring Cambridge on foot with friends. Now it was on the outside, while I sat inside a dorm whose tiny triangle shower and bunked beds I had never imagined in countless strolls past this building.Over the past four years, I have regained some sense of balance between these dimensions. The isolated, often inward-looking Harvard worlds I discovered during my freshman year feel like they have opened up to become part of the broad landscape of Cambridge as I know it. I meet friends to study in Kirkland Dining Hall or Café Gato Rojo as often as I go to the 1369 in Inman Square or Darwin’s on Mount Auburn Street.While the brick-walled barriers between Harvard and the larger Cambridge community remain mostly intact, I appreciate the luxury of being able to move between them now. I also appreciate the insight this has afforded me — that one physical location can represent multiple different worlds offering endless new experiences. I did not get to move outward, to explore the greener pastures and larger cities outside Cambridge. But in staying here I have been able to move inward, to explore instead the corners and complexities of this place.last_img read more

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8 Feb
2021

Estrin, Copeland, Cray among Blues Music Awards nominees

first_imgMEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The bands Rick Estrin & the Nightcats and Sugar Ray & the Bluetones have each received five nominations for the annual Blues Music Awards. Based in Memphis, Tennessee, The Blues Foundation said the awards will be held online on June 6. The awards honor blues music recordings, performances and songwriting. Rick Estrin & the Nightcats and Sugar Ray & the Bluetones are nominated in the band of the year category, along with Anthony Geraci’s Boston Blues Allstars, John Németh & the Blue Dreamers, and Southern Avenue. Shemekia Copeland is nominated four times. Other nominees include Robert Cray, Bettye LaVette and Samantha Fish.last_img

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18 Jan
2021

Fletcher School Pupil Tests Positive For COVID Virus

first_imgZUMA / MGN JAMESTOWN — The Chautauqua County Health Department has confirmed that a pupil at Fletcher Elementary School has tested positive for the COVID-19 virus.Officials said the pupil last attended school in person on Thursday, Oct. 8.The Jamestown School District said no in-school contact tracing will ne required and that the child was remote-learning when contact with another positive test person was made. out-of-school contact tracing is taking place.Officials said parents need to understand that a confirmed case does not mean that they have been in contact with the pupil who tested positive. “We want to remind our families, students and staff to keep our students and staff safe by wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and continuing frequent hand washing whether at school or in the community,” said JPS Superintendent Dr. Kevin Whitaker. “As a parent, if you see your child exhibiting any COVID-19 symptoms, please keep your child home and contact his or her health provider for a diagnosis.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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1 Jan
2021

Figure skating champion Michelle Kwan commencement speaker at Southern Vermont College

first_imgMichelle Kwan, the most decorated figure skater in US history (five World Championships, nine US National titles, two Olympic medals), who is also an author and US diplomatic envoy, will add doctor to her already impressive resume, when she receives an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at Southern Vermont College’s 83rd Commencement Exercises on Saturday, May 8. Kwan, a California native, will also address the graduating class as its commencement speaker. Named the nation’s first Public Diplomacy Envoy for the U.S. State Department in 2006, Kwan travels widely to speak with youth across the globe about America, its culture and values, and the life lessons learned through sports. She is currently a graduate student at Tufts University’s Fletcher School of International Affairs.For more than a decade, Kwan dominated the figure skating world, winning a record 43 titles. In the nearly 100-year history of U.S. figure skating, no American man or woman has won more world titles, national titles or Olympic medals. The author of two books, Michelle Kwan: Heart of a Champion (1997) and The Winning Attitude! (1999), Kwan’s undergraduate education and degree at the University of Denver (2008) focused on international studies, a topic she continues in her graduate work. In her current role as a Public Diplomacy Envoy, she travels throughout the world to meet and speak with young people about leadership and to engage them in dialogue on social and educational issues.“I am honored to be invited to attend and participate in Commencement Exercises at Southern Vermont College,” said Kwan. “Education has and always will be a very important part of my life. I look forward to speaking to the graduating class, sharing some of my life experiences with them and congratulating them for their own academic accomplishments and success.”“I am delighted that Michelle will address our graduates and receive an Honorary Degree,” said SVC President Karen Gross. “She is the embodiment of someone who has worked hard to pursue a dream, someone who is not afraid to fall down, get back up, and strive for excellence at each and every turn. Her personal story is compelling and inspiring for our graduates, as they enter the next chapter in their lives.”Kwan has earned numerous awards and honors including: the 2007 Billie Jean King Contribution Award and 1998 Sportswoman of the Year Award from the Women’s Sports Foundation; 2003 U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) Sportswoman of the Year; the prestigious 2001 Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in America; 2002 and 2003 Kids’ Choice Award and the 2002 Teen Choice Award as America’s favorite female athlete. She has worked at both the state and national level to encourage physical fitness among youth.Michelle Kwan follows recent SVC Commencement speakers and honorary degree recipients author Andre Dubus III, who wrote the novel turned film, House of Sand and Fog; Awarding winning journalist Christine Dugas; now at USA Today; and ESPN sports commentator Sean McDonough.Founded in 1926, Southern Vermont College offers a career-enhancing, liberal arts education with 22 academic degree programs for approximately 500 students. Southern Vermont College recognizes the importance of educating students for the workplace of the twenty-first century and for lives as successful leaders in their communities. SVC’s intercollegiate athletics teams are part of the New England Collegiate Conference. The College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.Source: Southern Vermont College. 3.25.2010###last_img read more

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