7 Oct
2019

Grad student research recognized with Jack M Miller awards

The Faculty of Graduate Studies (FGS) is pleased to announce the 2016 recipients of the Jack M. Miller Excellence in Research Awards.The awards have a proud history. They were established as the Excellence in Research Awards by the late Jack Miller when he served as Vice-President Research and Dean of Graduate Studies, from 1999 to 2004.As a tribute to Miller, the FGS renamed the awards in his honour in 2013 and, at the same time, increased the number of awards available and the value of each award.Since then, as many as 11 graduates students, in research-based programs, are selected annually from within the six academic faculties to receive between $1,000 to $1,500 to support their research and scholarship.Award criteria include the originality, significance, and depth of research projects as well as the student’s record of publications and presentations.“It’s a highly prestigious honour to be selected from within individual academic Faculties to receive a Miller award,” says Mike Plyley, Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies.“Our 2016 recipients stand apart for pursuing exciting and bold directions of research. They are passionate and committed about learning the craft of research as they address questions that are pertinent to today’s society. Their graduate student career is marked by strong records of publications and conference presentations through which they eagerly share what they know and why their work matters.”Over the next week, The Brock News will post a series of profiles about this year’s recipients. The first set of profiles features the winners from the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences.2016 Jack Miller Excellence in Research Awards for the Faculty of Applied Health SciencesKirsten Bott – MSc Applied Health Sciences; Supervisor Dr. Sandra PetersKirsten Bott is an emerging expert in both bone and muscle research, says her supervisor Dr. Sandra Peters.“While researchers have studied bone and muscle separately for some time, it is becoming increasingly clear that this approach is outdated, since the function/strength and metabolism of these two tissues are intimately linked. However, rarely are experts in one tissue even familiar with the other. Kirsten has successfully bridged this gap,” says Peters.“Kirsten has always had a clear direction of where she wants to go and how she is going to get there. This is a new direction for my lab, and I’m excited that a master’s student could be so instrumental in expanding my horizons.”Bott will continue doctoral studies at Brock under the supervision of Peters and Professor Wendy Ward. Her doctoral thesis will focus on investigating the effects of nutrition on muscle and bone health.“Studying the effects of these two major lifestyle factors together is of high importance given the increasingly aging population in Canada as a whole,” Bott says.“My goal is to begin a career in research and academia and this award assists me in continuing my studies to achieve that goal.”Bott’s research has been recognized with external funding support that includes OGS and QEII-OGSST scholarships. She has published a peer-reviewed paper as first author and has presented her research at local, national and international conferences and meetings.Bott is contributing to the University in many other ways. She is a member of the Biosciences Research Ethics Boards and the Brock Exercise and Medicine Committee, and was an assistant with the Leave the Pack behind project. Most recently, Bott began a second straight one-year term as the VP Communications for the Graduate Students’ Association. Lindsay Cline — PhD candidate Applied Health Sciences (Behavioural and Population Health); Supervisor Kim GammageLindsay Cline will put her award to good use very quickly.The monetary value of the award will help Cline cover registration fees to present her PhD research at the 2016 Canadian Positive Psychology Association conference this June.Cline’s research focuses on helping women develop more positive body image.“I am particularly interested in promoting body appreciation, a characteristic of positive body image, as a way of helping women to develop a protective filter against negative weight stigma often experienced by women who are overweight,” Cline explains.Cline is at the forefront of body image literature in three significant ways, says her supervisor Professor Kim Gammage.Lindsay Cline“Lindsay’s dissertation is among the first to investigate body image from a positive perspective,” Gammage says. “She has also taken a unique approach to understanding appearance commentary-feedback such as teasing and compliments.“Finally she has also taken a novel approach to investigating the impact of body weight on body image.”In May, Cline also presented her study at the 2016 Qualitative Methods Conference in Glasgow, Scotland.She has a growing record of publications with four published-papers and in-press-papers along with two more in submission.Cline’s research, both as a master’s and doctoral student, has been recognized with prestigious funding support from SSHRC, CGS and OGS.She is a recipient of several Brock awards that highlight both qualities of academic excellence and leadership contributions. These awards include the Spirit of Brock Award, the President’s Surgite Award, the Brock University Distinguished Graduate Student Award, and the Barb Daly Excellence & Student Leadership Award.“Lindsay is a leader by example in my lab — influencing students from the high school mentorship program, to undergraduates completing independent studies and theses, to master’s students’ research projects,” Gammage says.This year’s other recipients are:Master’s students:Jesse Abbott, HistoryKirsten Bott, Applied Health SciencesMegan Earle, PsychologyZahid Rahman, ManagementXiaolong Yang, ChemistryDoctoral students:Terry Chu, ChemistryLindsay Cline, Applied Health SciencesShawn Geniole, PsychologyJulia Polyck-O’Neill, Interdisciplinary Humanities read more

Read More
25 Sep
2019

Jamaicas lack of competitiveness could blight future with CARICOM — Golding

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedGolding urges Caricom states to loosen chokehold on sovereigntyFebruary 20, 2018In “Regional”CSME implementation deficit not Secretariat’s fault – GoldingJune 11, 2018In “Regional”Presidents of Cuba, Chile to join CARICOM Heads at 39th meetingJuly 2, 2018In “latest news” KINGSTON, Jamaica — Former prime minister Bruce Golding says Jamaica’s trade imbalance could be one of the factors that hinder their future with the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM).Golding made the assertion during his address at the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce (JCC) exclusive Breakfast Conversation on April 26 at the Knutsford Court Hotel, where he spoke to private sector businesses about the critical consideration that must be given to determine the extent and nature of Jamaica’s future involvement with CARICOM.According to a release from the JCC today, Golding said Jamaica has failed to develop and implement the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) which has contributed to a lack of competitiveness and diversification from the country.“Too many companies are producing the same products and we are unable to sell those same products to each other,” the former prime minister was quoted as saying.The CSME is an initiative currently being explored by CARICOM that would integrate all of its member-states into a single economic unit.“Essentially, Golding is saying, is that countries within CARICOM need to produce enough products that can sustain themselves and create trade opportunities with the world so that more foreign exchange can be earned to pay effectively for things these countries do not produce,” said the JCC.According to JCC, Golding said he believed “Jamaica is better off being a part of CARICOM because CARICOM could be a benefit to Jamaica.“In Haiti, it is 11 million people and they have a demand for goods and services that is enormous. 17 million persons is a huge difference from the 2.7 million we have in Jamaica, five times the Jamaican market”.He reportedly cited Digicel and Jamaica Broilers, as they were among the first two companies to be in the Haitian market to supply products and services.“CARICOM imports 35 billion US dollars of goods such as merchandise imports, only 13 per cent of that Jamaica imports from each other, so in terms of intra-regional trade it’s over a little over 3 billion out of 35 billion dollars of imports” said Golding.He ended by saying, “Jamaica has to seriously contemplate & decide if it wants to be part of CARICOM and engage on the terms it demands”.The JCC agreed that Jamaica could carry far greater weight economically if it gets its house in order because our economic crisis is not CARICOM’s making but rather, CARICOM can impact positively our economic growth. (Jamaica Observer) read more

Read More