26 Jan
2021

Professors receive fellowships

first_imgTwo Notre Dame professors recently received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to pursue their scholarly work next year, increasing the University’s record number of NEH fellowships to 44 in the last 12 years. Notre Dame has earned more NEH fellowships since 1999 than any other university in the country, according to a University press release. The University of Michigan earned 35 NEH fellowships and Harvard earned 26. Notre Dame theology professor Eugene Ulrich received a fellowship this year in Ancient Languages to pursue his book, “The Bible in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls,” a compilation of his previous work on the topic. “The Dead Sea Scrolls … open up a period that we had lost sight of, a period that had just been lost to history,” Ulrich said. “Which is part of the period of the composition of the Scriptures.” Ulrich’s career has been focused on exploring this era through the scrolls, and therefore gaining a greater appreciation for and understanding of the Biblical texts. His work began as a graduate student at Harvard under Frank Cross, one of the two original American editors of the Dead Sea Scrolls. His dissertation became an analysis of one of the major scrolls. “It was being in the right place at the right time,” Ulrich said. Ulrich’s first NEH fellowship in 1977 enabled him to publish one of the scrolls, leading to a lifetime of research pertaining to these documents. When the other editor, Monsignor Patrick Skehan of Catholic University of America, died, he left his life’s work to Ulrich because he was so impressed with his research. “This coming year will be my 39th year of teaching here,” Ulrich said, “and 21 of those years, I have had NEH funding. They were very interested in the publication of the scrolls.” Ulrich’s upcoming work expands on a book he published last year, “The Biblical Qumran Scrolls: Transcriptions and Textual Variants,” which includes all of the text from the Biblical Scrolls, but makes it more accessible. “After going through scroll after scroll after scroll and seeing different surprises here, different surprises there, what I’m doing now is synthesizing all that and putting it into one monograph so that you can get in one book a clear explanation and description of how the Bible came to be the way it is,” Ulrich said. Thomas F. X. Noble, chair of Notre Dame’s History Department, received an NEH fellowship in Medieval Studies to produce his book “Rome in the Medieval Imagination,” a look at how Rome was perceived by different people and cultures during Medieval times. “Everyone had an opinion about Rome,” Noble said. “Good, bad or indifferent.” Noble’s previous work focused on Rome itself, especially Popes and the Roman Church. His new book, however, will explore Rome through the eyes of Medieval citizens. “Rome was a constant presence for Medieval people,” Noble said “It haunted their imagination, and [in my book] I am poking around inside people’s imagination a thousand years ago.” Noble said “Rome in the Medieval Imagination” will finally provide a source for Medieval scholars to learn about their subjects’ perceptions of Rome. “Whoever studies Medieval art, literature or history runs into Rome all the time,” Noble said. “Some people might be thinking why this author in 12th century France thought this about Rome … and they’ve never had a book to take off the shelf to look that up and find out. So what I’m trying to do is explain why you bump into Rome all the time if you study the Middle Ages.” This is Noble’s third NEH fellowship, but he said he still feels just as great about it as his first two. “When you win one of these awards, it means that an anonymous panel of our peers thought well of what we’re doing,” Noble said. “When the NEH looks at all those worthy applications and picks yours, it feels pretty good. Notre Dame has a wonderful tradition in winning these so it’s nice to be part of that group.”last_img read more

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30 Dec
2020

Power of the Peak

first_imgI spent last week trekking across big, beautiful mountains, and their pull on me was powerful as ever. It prompted me to wonder: Why do we seek out mountains and, in some cases, challenge ourselves against them?I was hoping to find answers in science. Biologist E.O. Wilson argues that we’re hardwired to feel a special connection with natural systems, something he calls “biophilia.” Because of how we evolved, he says, certain natural settings can be inviting at a deep, biological level. These settings embody the “connections we subconsciously seek with the rest of life,” connections Wilson believes are literally rooted in our blood. For example, Wilson suggests that we are drawn to the African savannah because our species originated there. But this certainly doesn’t explain why mountains—which can be dangerous and forbidding, and often lack life—wield such a visceral effect on us.Next, I turned to the intersection of natural science and math, where there is longstanding evidence that humans are attracted to symmetry. This can be traced back to ancient Greek times when Plato wrote of golden ratios and shapes like rectangles were held in the highest regard. The Greeks believed in three prongs to beauty: symmetry, proportion, and harmony.Modern experiments confirm the Greeks were on to something. Numerous psychology studies show that babies are more attracted to symmetrical shapes than non-symmetrical ones, and that we rate people’s beauty based on the symmetry of their faces. Scientists hypothesize this strong preference for balance is borne out of the fact that symmetry may represent superior genetic quality and also symbolize a lack of stress during development.Mountains, however, are anything but symmetrical. If anything, their inherent asymmetry—jagged edges, undulating ridgelines, and steep pitches—is the very result of continuous stress throughout their development, including earthquakes, monsoons, and other natural disasters. If mountains were humans, they’d be disfigured and malformed, the oldest, most battered of us all.Physics was easy to cross off the list. Its fundamental force, gravity, says that what goes up must come down. Yet mountains tend to have the opposite effect, bringing what is down up, elevating the spirit and soul of those who stand below.A neuroscientist might argue that the sensation mountains elicit is related to a lack of oxygen in high-altitude air. While altitude definitely has real and formidable effects—I can attest to these effects personally—feeling drunk is different than feeling moved. Mountains continue to take our breath away long after science says it should have returned.Although science may not directly answer the question of why we are drawn to mountains, it is beginning to uncover the benefits of such a draw. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, found that awe may be related to good health. Experiencing awe is associated with lower levels of interleukin-6, which is a molecule that encourages inflammation. In other words, more awe is likely associated with less inflammation. Dacher Keltner, senior author on the study, told the New York Times that although awe can be hard to define, one of the emotion’s primary qualities is that it “passes the goosebumps test.”Perhaps we are drawn to mountains because they elicit awe, and awe makes us feel good. But this still does not explain why mountains inspire awe in the first place.Could it be that mountains affect us so powerfully because they are big and remind us that we are small? Especially in today’s tumult of Facebook and Twitter and customized newsfeeds and on-demand everything, it is very easy to get lost in our own little worlds—little worlds in which it is easy to feel pretty big. While there is a power to feeling big, there is an equal and perhaps even greater power to feeling small.Dasher Keltner seems to agree. He wrote that “vastness” and “self-diminishment” are typical characteristics of awe. He even called out mountains as emblematic of an “awe inspiring entity.”George Mallory, a British Mountaineer who partook in the first three expeditions on Everest (and ultimately lost his life trying to summit), famously said of why he climbed Everest, “Because it is there… Its existence is a challenge. The answer is instinctive, a part of man’s desire to conquer the universe.”But perhaps Mallory wasn’t completely correct. Yes, we want to conquer mountains, but maybe not because we long to “conquer the universe.” Rather, it could be that the act of climbing a mountain tends to have the opposite effect—not conquering the universe but connecting us to it, reminding us how vast the universe is and how small a part of it we are.last_img read more

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18 Dec
2020

Freeport Duo Charged With Attempted Murder

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two men have been arrested for shooting and seriously wounding a 23-year-old man in the suspects’ hometown of Freeport last month, Nassau County police said.James Tobin, 23, and 20-year-old Ali Jones were each charged with second-degree attempted murder.Police said the two men shot the victim in the abdomen on Randall Avenue near Wallace Street at 1:10 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4.The victim was treated for his injuries at a nearby hospital.Investigators found four .380 caliber shell casings at the scene and a fifth shell casing found in the victim’s clothing.First Squad detectives alleged that the duo “intended to cause the death of the victim,” they said in a news release.Tobin was arrested a day after the shooting and was ordered held without bail. Jones was apprehended this week and will be arraigned Friday at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

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24 Sep
2020

Neville warns Man Utd against Ighalo deal

first_img Reports have linked United with signing him permanently for nearly £20 million. But Neville thinks it is a mistake. read also:Blow for Man Utd as Shanghai want Ighalo back by July “Is ighalo worth £20m?” said Neville, per Metro. “Probably not in this market. “He may have been if he continued before scoring goals but you probably don’t need now to spend £20m.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Manchester United great, Gary Neville, has warned the English club against overpricing the deal of Nigeria’s  Odion Ighalo. Loading… Neville is of the opinion that  Ighalo should be let go when the season ends. The Nigerian has impressed in a handful of games following his January loan move from Shanghai Shenhua.Advertisement Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way20 Facts That’ll Change Your Perception Of “The Big Bang Theory”A Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever MadeBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonPlus-Size Girls Who Set The Catwalk On Fire6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricaneslast_img read more

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