26 Jan
2021

The Glee Project’ contestant speaks about true beauty

first_imgThe cast of The Glee Project presented True Beauty at the Carroll Auditorium in Saint Mary’s Madeleva Hall last night. Members of the show discussed their definition of beauty and self esteem as a part of Love Your Body Week. The Glee Project’s contender, Hannah McIalwain, said the True Beauty Program promotes confidence in women’s self-image. “Everyone is going to struggle with some insecurity, but come back to yourself and say, ‘Yes, I am good enough,’” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she struggled with self-image in her younger years but gained confidence before entering high school. She said she became active in school plays and felt happier. When her parents divorced during her junior year, she ate for comfort, McIalwain said. “I felt alone and I continued to gain pounds. This was a low point,” she said. “I had no one else who knew the real me and I portrayed myself as happy and bubbly.” In her senior year, auditions for MTV’s Made arrived at her high school, she said. McIalwain auditioned and landed a spot. The show changed her life, she said. “I went for everything in the show. I turned around and I felt beautiful and confident,” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she attended college at Queens University with a fresh perspective. Though a heartbreak set her back, McIalwain decided to audition for The Glee Project as well. She was chosen to be in the show with eleven other contenders. “This gave me more self-confidence than before, but I still felt like I was not good enough, but each week I kept growing,” McIalwain said. “Eventually, I gained a strong self-confidence out of the show.” The most difficult task in The Glee Project was the week of vulnerability, she said. Contenders wrote their insecurities on a white board and held their sign in front of strangers. “My insecurity was simply, fat. I felt embarrassed before the cameras were on and broke down,” McIalwain said. ” But … It does not define me; it does not matter.” McIalwain said she remained in Los Angeles for two months after the show ended for auditions, but no jobs were offered. She left Hollywood and moved back home with her mother. “I felt like I was being left behind,” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she worked minimum wage jobs until she had enough money to move back to Los Angeles. She is currently looking for more opportunities there, she said. “You have to keep going. All of us are beautiful and perfect,” McIalwain said. Through the True Beauty Project, McIalwain speaks to women about the influence the media, peers and parents have on the definition of beauty. “You have to know your confidence. You have to realize what is beautiful and redefine what beauty is,” McIalwain said.last_img read more

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26 Jan
2021

Lecture features Irish secret society

first_imgThe Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies hosted graduate student Jessica Lumsden for the Shamrocks and Secrets lecture series, which focused on early 19th century Ireland and the growth of a secret and frequently violent society known as the Ribbonmen.Although many rumors concerning the Ribbonmen still circulate, Lumsden said there are only a few established facts on the society and consequently little historical investigation into the subject.“What we do have is we have many, many police reports; we have letters of gentlemen who were actively investigating the Ribbonmen; we have newspaper coverage of Ribbon crimes; we have a collection of captured passwords and oaths and signs,” she said. “So you have all these things that indicate what Ribbonmen were up to or at least what they thought they were up to.”Lumsden said much of what we know about Ribbonism comes from the personal testimonies of informers claiming to be part of the society, as well as scattered references to Ribbonmen in Irish literature.The sources reveal Ribbonmen operated on both a local and national level, she said. On the local level, Ribbonism was primarily agrarian and the Ribbonmen were involved in “trying to control local trade, local land, local politics and do some local policing of the community.”On the national level, Lumsden said Ribbonism supported the nationalist movement and worked to repeal the Act of Union that both declared Ireland a part of Great Britain and merged the British and Irish parliaments.“Ribbonmen are actually critically important to Irish history, and they’re forgotten for a number of reasons,” she said.Emerging from the remains of a previous secret society known as the Defenders, the exclusively Catholic Ribbonmen became active around 1810 and gained traction between 1816 and 1824, Lumsden said.Violence was a key component of Ribbonism, and Lumsden said members often left “coffin notices” containing death threats. The 1816 murders at Wildgoose Lodge, in which the Ribbonmen burned alive an informant and his family, cemented Ribbonism’s status as a powerful secret society characterized by violence.“It caused uproar in Ireland,” she said. “This was violence that was not unknown, but it was violence that was attached to this secret society that was a new secret society, so that gave it some weight.”Lumsden said following a schism which divided the Ribbonmen into two factions – the Dublin Ribbonmen and the Ulster Ribbonmen – the capture and trial of the secretary of the Dublin Ribbonmen resulted in the collapse of Dublin Ribbonism.The Ulster Ribbonmen disintegrated soon after, she said, and by the mid-19th century, Ribbonism no longer occupied the position of power it once held.“The specter of Ribbonism really gets broken after the 1840s,” she said.The Ribbonmen’s legacy lies in their intricate national network, which Lumsden said enabled the persistence of Irish nationalism.“These Ribbonmen built this diasporic network of Irish nationalism and fed that fire and kept that network alive so that it could be used by later nationalist groups,” she said. “The Ribbonmen keep alive this nationalism, and then they spread it.”Tags: Ireland, Jessica Lumsden, Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, Ribbonmen, Shamrocks and Secrets lecture serieslast_img read more

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23 Sep
2020

Dodge City Raceway Park shifts practice to May 23

first_imgBy Lonnie Wheatley  Following the tentative practice session set for May 23, pending further developments, Dodge City Raceway Park will now kick off the season with a URSS vs. DCRP Sprint Car showdown along with a full slate of championship chase action including IMCA Modifieds, IMCA SportMods, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks on Saturday, June 6. In an additional schedule adjustment, the seventh annual SportMod Mayhem North vs. South Duel will now take place in conjunction with the Lubbock Wrecker Service DCRP Sprint Car Nationals on Aug. 20-22.  The Thursday portion of the event will serve as a practice night for the IMCA Modifieds with heats and qualifiers on Friday and then the $1,500-to-win main event on Saturday. DODGE CITY, Kan. – In the ever-changing environment of the current COVID-19 coronavirus culture, Dodge City Raceway Park has shifted its open practice to a tentative date of Saturday, May 23, rather than the previously scheduled date of May 16. Originally slated to run in conjunction with the DCRP Sprint Car Nationals, the eighth annual Modified Stampede has been shifted off the Aug. 20-22 date due to scheduling conflicts.  The track is actively searching for an alternative date for the event. The Aug. 15 event that was the originally scheduled IMCA SportMod Mayhem will now serve as a Prelude to Mayhem with the IMCA SportMods accompanied by IMCA Modifieds, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks. Dodge City Raceway Park officials along with city, county and state officials will continue to monitor current developments and make any adjustments if necessary.last_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

Film fatale

first_imgLunafest, a traveling film festival that works to connect women through the medium of cinema, held a screening of Lunafest short films at the School of Cinematic Arts on Friday evening.  The director of one of the short films, Susana Casares, hosted a Q&A on her film Tryouts.last_img

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