21 Sep
2019

The 9 at 9 Wednesday

first_img Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Share1 Tweet Email EVERY MORNING, TheJournal.ie brings you the stories you need to know as you start your day.1. #TENSIONS: The master of the National Maternity Hospital has said their services will be “entirely independent” as the board is due to meet later today.2. #TERROR ATTACKS: Gardaí warned they’re not prepared for terror attacks, claim Irish airports are particularly vulnerable with only three detectives on duty.3. #OUCH: The Central Bank has fined AIB nearly €2.3 million for a series of anti-money laundering and terrorist financing compliance failures.4. #MYTHBUSTER: There is no link between consumption of saturated fat and health issues like coronary heart disease and type two diabetes.5. #DONALD TRUMP: With the funding for his wall about to run out, US lawmakers inched closer to a deal last night.6. #TISSUE PAPER: Irish Rail has cracked down on illegal and aggressive begging which has been happening on train routes in the greater Dublin area.7. #ROADWORKS: A third lane is badly needed on the N11/M11 roadway to tackle increased traffic congestion.8. #BORDER COMMUNITIES: A letter has been delivered to the Taoiseach calling on him to demand a special status for the North in upcoming Brexit talks.9. #SADDENED: United Airlines have been landed with yet more negative headlines after a giant rabbit died in the hold of one of its planes. Short URL 12,020 Views By Gráinne Ní Aodha http://jrnl.ie/3358607 Wednesday 26 Apr 2017, 8:54 AM The 9 at 9: Wednesday Gardaí warn they’re not ready for a terrorist attack, AIB fined €2 million and new Dublin motorway? Here are Wednesday’s news. Image: Shutterstock/zarzamora Image: Shutterstock/zarzamora 1 Comment Apr 26th 2017, 8:54 AM last_img read more

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18 Aug
2019

Transgender Pakistanis face societys scorn

first_img 4 must play golf courses in Arizona Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix 5 ways to recognize low testosterone Comments   Share   Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy Top Stories Sponsored Stories Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Associated PressRAWALPINDI, Pakistan (AP) – Dressed up in elaborate, feminine outfits and artfully applied makeup, they are showered with money while dancing at all-male wedding parties. But the lives of transgender people in Pakistan are also marked by harassment, rejection and poverty.Transgender people live in a tenuous position in conservative Pakistan, where the roles of the sexes are traditionally starkly drawn. Families often push them out of the home when they’re young, forcing many to prostitute themselves to earn a living. Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day In other parts of the region and Muslim world, the attitude toward transgenders is also complex. In Thailand, the community is very visible and broadly tolerated. Transgender people are regularly seen on TV soap operas, working at department store cosmetics counters or popular restaurants and walking the runways in numerous transgender beauty pageants.Many transgender Indonesians publicly wear women’s clothes and makeup and work as singers. But societal disdain still runs deep. They have taken a much lower profile in recent years, following a series of attacks by Muslim hard-liners.In Malaysia, Muslim men who wear women’s clothes can be prosecuted in Islamic courts.In the Arab world, there is little opportunity for transgender people to openly show their identity in public. In 2007, Kuwait made “imitating members of the opposite sex” a crime, leading to the arrest of hundreds of transgender women, Human Rights Watch said. In Iraq, extremists have targeted and killed people perceived of being gay or effeminate.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) One role where they are tolerated is as dancers at weddings and other celebrations at which men and women are strictly segregated. In between the dancing and showers of rupee notes, they must fend off groping from drunken guests.“I don’t understand why people feel it is their duty to tease and taunt us,” said one transgender Pakistani who goes by the name Symbal. Many in the transgender community pick a name for themselves and do not use their last name to protect their family.Others beg on the streets or earn money by blessing newborn babies. The blessings reflect a widespread belief in Pakistan and other South Asian nations that God answers the prayers of someone who was born underprivileged, said Iqbal Hussain, a Pakistani researcher who has studied the transgender community. But he cautioned that didn’t mean people were ready to give them equal rights.In recent years the community has gained some government protection. A Supreme Court ruling in 2011 allowed them to get national identity cards recognizing them as a separate identity _ neither male or female _ and allowing them to vote. In neighboring India, the election commission ruled in 2009 that transgender people could register to vote as “other,” rather than male or female.last_img read more

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