17 Sep
2020

SB : Syracuse to open home schedule with historic two games inside Carrier Dome

first_img Comments Published on March 21, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Nick: nctoney@syr.edu | @nicktoneytweets Facebook Twitter Google+center_img After an email from the Alabama athletic department planted the idea in Leigh Ross’ mind in 2006, she became captivated with the thought of the Syracuse softball team hosting a game inside the Carrier Dome.For the Syracuse head coach, the opportunity was too unique to pass up, especially when the Crimson Tide was offering to travel north for a three-game series. So Ross, then in her first season at the helm, promised to make the Carrier Dome host Orange softball one day.‘I didn’t even know we were practicing inside, so that email from Alabama was the first bug I got,’ Ross said of the email.It took almost six years, but Ross’ dream will finally take place this weekend. SU will play two games this weekend in the Carrier Dome – the first softball games played in Syracuse’s iconic arena.Though the Duel at the Dome tournament will feature Colgate and Canisius as the Orange’s opponents instead of an Alabama tripleheader, SU decided to take advantage of an early bye week in its Big East schedule to host the games inside.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn Thursday, the crew at the Carrier Dome will transform the football and lacrosse field into a softball diamond for two games this weekend. Syracuse will play indoors for its first home game of the season Friday when it takes on Colgate at 7 p.m. The Orange will play the second game against Canisius on Saturday at 6 p.m.‘We don’t get to play too many home games because of the weather,’ Ross said. ‘I think players are excited to have friends and family come be a part of something like this.’Ross said SU plans on making the Duel at the Dome an annual tournament. Next year, the Orange anticipates hosting teams earlier in the nonconference schedule when the weather makes outdoor games impossible.Even though SU could play outside this weekend in the unseasonably warm weather, second baseman Stephanie Watts is excited to be part of the first home game in the Carrier Dome.‘The weather isn’t traditionally like this in March,’ Watts said. ‘We love to play outside, but I think this can be a great jumping off point for SU going forward. The Carrier Dome is such a landmark here, so I think it’s awesome for everyone involved.’Watts said that if Syracuse plans to make the Duel at the Dome an annual event, freshmen players may get the most from SU’s first Dome game. She said that younger players can get a feel for the Carrier Dome early. Then they can use that knowledge to their advantage against opponents later to establish a home-field advantage at the Dome.This Orange team may not yet know how the ball bounces on the Carrier Dome turf. But if this weekend is as big a success as Ross hopes, that knowledge could come in handy against marquee opponents.Catcher Lacey Kohl doesn’t want this game to be a novelty. The softball program can use the games this weekend to gain more national attention, and it has shown that the athletic department is devoting more attention to the softball program.‘It really means a lot that everything they’re doing is geared toward making the Dome more softball-friendly,’ Kohl said. ‘Even small things like screwing the bases into the turf make a difference. That’s what softball schools do.’What’s good for traditional softball powers should be good for the up-and-comers like SU. Two weeks ago, the Orange defeated three ranked opponents at the Citrus Classic tournament in Orlando, Fla. The team has also played Arizona, UCLA and California – three elite softball programs.A successful Duel at the Dome could mean more emails in Ross’ inbox from those teams about traveling to play SU for a change.‘I think ultimately it brings more attention to our program,’ Ross said. ‘It’ll be neat for the girls to play in this game.’nctoney@syr.edulast_img read more

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17 Sep
2020

Student Talk Back focuses on poverty

first_imgOn Wednesday afternoon, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Science’s Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics hosted the semester’s second installment of “Students Talk Back: A Politics and Public Policy Forum” in partnership with the USC College Democrats, USC College Republicans and the Daily Trojan.The theme for the week’s discussion was, “War on Poverty: 50 Years and Fighting.” The talk was moderated by Burke Gibson, chief copy editor of the Daily Trojan, and Kerstyn Olson, interim director of the Unruh Institute.Panelists included Reed Galen, owner of Jedburghs, LLC and a former adjunct professor at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism; Angelica Solis, director of community development for the Youth Policy Institute and students Christian Patterson, a member of the USC College Democrats and Giuseppe Robalino, the director of Political Affairs and Strategy for the College Republicans.The discussion began with the current state of the War on Poverty in Los Angeles, a city recently named one of five “Promise Zones” by President Barack Obama, implementing a program he outlined in the 2013 State of the Union Address.Solis, however, said Los Angeles is not guaranteed any funding just because it was named a Promise Zone.“There actually aren’t any funds attached to the Promise Zones,” she said. “The distinction to be very clear about is it is a designation — it provides [for] the city of L.A. to apply for competitive federal funding.”The panelists then tackled the effectiveness of the War on Poverty as a whole. For Galen, who was a deputy campaign manager for the 2008 presidential campaign of John McCain, the true measure of the War on Poverty’s success is not the idea behind it, but how that idea is implemented.“The biggest failure is how many folks we have that live consistently below the poverty line and the intergenerational impact of that,” he said. “If there is an indictment, it is not the ideals behind it, it is the execution.”Patterson agreed and spoke of the immense benefits that federal programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps) and the Earned Income Tax Credit have had on families struggling to climb out of poverty.Before opening the floor to questions from the audience, Olson asked the panel for comments on how democrats and republicans can compromise on the issue.“Republicans must get over being indifferent to the plight of folks who live below the poverty line and being cavalier to the fact that people might starve the death,” Galen said. “If we’re going be the party of opportunity, we should be the party of opportunity for everybody — not [just] white families in the suburbs.”Robalino agreed with Galen’s sentiments.“This is an issue the Republican Party can come to own,” he said. “It hearkens back to Horatio Alger’s ideas on coming from rags to riches.”Patterson, however, did not believe the Republican Party cared about the War on Poverty based on recent legislation the party has fought for.“We should not think of the war on poverty as a Democrat issue or a Republican issue,” Patterson said. “I don’t think the Republican stance on the War on Poverty will be a hard pill to swallow for many people, given that the House just fought for months and months to cut $40 billion from food stamps.”Students in attendance spoke of the importance of hearing the conversation from the viewpoint of students as well as professionals.“It’s nice to hear both perspectives, people that are working in the field that we’re talking about and students that are politically involved coming from a different point of view in the classroom,” said Jennifer    Ann-Massey, president of the USC College Republicans.Olson emphasized the ability of “Talk Backs” to showcase different opinions and views.“I hope that they are provided a broad perspective,” Olson said. “Not just ideologically, but considering all of the social factors that contribute to poverty and thinking outside of their political leanings about how the other side has made attempts to or has been successful in preventing poverty in their districts.”The next “Students Talk Back” is Feb. 26, and will cover California’s historic drought.last_img read more

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