7 Nov
2019

Victorian Women’s Team To Play In Storm Half-Time Exhibition

first_imgThe Victorian Women’s Open team will take to the field at AAMI Park in Melbourne on Monday night to play an exhibition match during the half-time break of the Melbourne Storm versus Cronulla Sharks NRL game.The half-time game is part of the Touch Football Victoria (TFV) Women in Sport program and will be a great way to showcase the talent of the 2012 Victorian National Touch League (NTL) Women’s Open team in front of thousands of Rugby League fans. The top grassroots players from the local Fawkner Park competition will take on the Victorian Women’s Open team in the match, while Victoria’s first Australian Open representative, Leah Percy, will be interviewed and highlights of her performance at the 2012 Trans Tasman Series will also be played on the big screen. Stay tuned to www.austouch.com.au to find out how the game on Monday night went. For more information about Monday’s game, please visit www.victouch.com.au. Related LinksStorm Exhibition Gamelast_img read more

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28 Oct
2019

a month agoArsenal youngster Smith Rowe out for two weeks with concussion

first_imgArsenal youngster Smith Rowe out for two weeks with concussionby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal midfielder Emile Smith Rowe is set to miss two weeks of action after suffering a head injury against Nottingham Forest.Manager Unai Emery said after the 5-0 win that Smith Rowe’s collision with Forest skipper Jack Robinson wasn’t serious.The 19-year-old has suffered concussion and will not return to action for at least six days due to FIFA protocol.The Daily Mail adds that Arsenal will likely extend that break to two weeks given Smith Rowe’s age.It was the youngster’s first appearance this Eason after covering from injury. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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27 Oct
2019

In Photos: Everything You Need To Know About Jen Lada, ESPN’s New Colin Cowherd Show Contributor

first_imgJen Lada speaking on ESPN.This summer, there will be a new face (and voice) on Colin Cowherd’s radio show on ESPN – Jen Lada. Lada, who is leaving Comcast Sports Net in Chicago to take the new gig, will be featured as a regular contributor on the show. There are also rumors that she’ll be featured on SportsCenter and a number of other programs on the network. Lada, now 34 years old, announced that she’d be leaving Comcast Sports Net in June, and she’s set to start at the Worldwide Leader in August.Thank you @CSNChicago for taking a chance on me, for trusting me to represent you well & for teaching me every day. pic.twitter.com/DSkk9FJzfa— Jen Lada (@JenLada) June 26, 2015How did she get her career started? Where is she from? And is she single? We’ve got those answers and more, along with a few photos of the rising star.In Photos: Everything You Need To Know About Jen Lada >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7last_img read more

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18 Jul
2019

Scientific evidence for and against causal associations for 47 adverse effects after

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 29 2019A new systematic review provides a succinct summary of the scientific evidence for and/or against causal associations for 47 adverse events following immunization (AEFI). Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2019 Meeting, taking place on April 24 – May 1 in Baltimore.”Health care providers desire objective and clear information on a broad range of vaccine safety issues to assist them in answering patient questions,” said Matthew Dudley, PhD, MSPH, one of the authors of the study. “There have been no recent comprehensive reviews on AEFI, and previous reviews were not written for providers or the public. This systematic review provides an update to the scientific evidence assessing possible causal associations of AEFI compiled in the 2012 report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the 2014 report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), along with clear causality conclusions intended for health care providers.”Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyComputer-generated flu vaccine enters clinical trials in the USNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsThe review found that for 12 of the 47 AEFI studied, a causal relationship has been established with at least one vaccine currently routinely recommended to the general population in the U.S. These 12 confirmed adverse reactions are: anaphylaxis, arthralgia/arthritis (mild, acute and transient, not chronic), deltoid bursitis (when vaccine is administered improperly), disseminated varicella infection (in immune deficient individuals for whom the varicella vaccine is contraindicated), encephalitis, febrile seizures, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, hepatitis (in immune deficient individuals for whom the varicella vaccine is contraindicated), herpes zoster, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, meningitis and syncope. Most of these adverse reactions are rare.For the other 35 AEFIs, the evidence does not support a causal relationship with vaccines recommended for routine use in the U.S. In particular, the evidence shows a clear lack of association between certain vaccines and AEFIs: influenza vaccines do not cause asthma, childhood vaccines do not cause autism, vaccines do not cause diabetes, vaccines given to immunocompetent persons do not cause hepatitis, influenza vaccines do not cause MS in adults, and DTP and hepatitis B vaccines do not cause Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).Dr. Dudley added, “Although vaccines currently recommended for the general population in the U.S. do cause some adverse reactions, vaccines have an excellent safety profile overall and provide protection against infectious diseases to individuals and the general population.”Source: https://2019.pas-meeting.org/last_img read more

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18 Jul
2019

Fungal infection study identifies specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 16 2019Ten years ago, in Marathon County, Wisconsin, 55 people were sickened by an uncommon fungal infection called blastomycosis. Thirty patients were hospitalized. Two people died.The fungus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, found naturally in wet soil and in decomposing wood throughout the Great Lakes region and the Mississippi Valley, can cause flu-like illness and in severe cases, death. Wisconsin has among the highest incidence rates of the disease in the U.S. and outbreaks ranging up to 100 cases periodically occur in the state.Given the size of the Marathon County outbreak, the state asked the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for help launching an investigation -; unusually, 20 patients infected with the fungus were of Hmong descent. Investigators found that Asian people had a disproportionate risk of developing blastomycosis infections relative to other groups in the U.S. and they ruled out lifestyle explanations, such as gardening practices and recreation.Now, a new study led by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers Caitlin Pepperell and Bruce Klein has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus. We were struck by this because it hadn’t been described before … rates were 10-to-100 times greater than one might expect based on population numbers alone. It’s really been a holy grail question -; why are some people more vulnerable and what is the basis for this?”Bruce Klein, infectious disease physician and professor of pediatrics, internal medicine, and medical microbiology and immunology at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) Understanding these vulnerabilities is really important for patients, says Pepperell, also an infectious disease physician and associate professor of medicine and medical microbiology and immunology at SMPH, because it can help physicians make better-informed and more timely decisions about treatment for people who are at higher risk.”Unfortunately, a really typical story with blastomycosis is having a long delay to diagnosis because it’s a (relatively) rare disease and people are not familiar with it,” Pepperell says. The earlier people are treated, the better their outcomes.At the start of the study, recently published in the open-access journal mBio, Pepperell surmised that Hmong people in Wisconsin, who have “experienced a long series of forced displacements and migrations,” might be more genetically isolated than other groups and thus have less genetic variation powering their fight against some diseases.That’s because every gene we inherit exists in pairs called alleles -; we get one copy from each parent. Having two alleles that are different creates variation, but as is often the case in genetically isolated groups, the alleles can also be identical, or homozygous. A person who inherits one good copy of a gene and one bad still has some protection from its effects, while a person who gets two bad copies is more vulnerable.”Many disease-causing variants are homozygous,” Pepperell explains.With the help of her former graduate student, co-author Donny Xiong, the research team gained consent from nine of the affected Hmong patients to collect blood and examine their cells.Related StoriesStudy: Treatment of psychosis can be targeted to specific genetic mutationGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Researchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromePepperell and her graduate student, study co-author Mary O’Neill, looked for long stretches of homozygosity in the genomes of the Hmong participants. They found them in a region known to be important for immune responses to fungi.Within that region are genes for an immune element known as cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), which helps lead to the development of another immune responder known as interleukin-17 (IL-17), involved in teaching the body to fight fungal infections. The research team found that the cells of Hmong people created less IL-6 than the cells of European donors.The specialized cells that produce IL-17, called Type 17 cytokine T helper cells (TH17), “patrol the mucosal surfaces of the body and are important in alarming (the body’s) first-line defenses,” Klein explains. “They serve as the cavalry and mop up invaders.”Klein’s research team found previously in mice that TH17 cells are particularly important for responding to fungal invaders and that IL-6 is pivotal to their creation. The finding suggested to the researchers that Hmong people who produce less IL-6 may have fewer TH17 cells, and thus, less IL-17.So, Klein’s team went back to the mouse model and found that mice lacking IL-6 had significantly fewer TH17 cells than normal mice, were extremely vulnerable to Blastomyces infection, experienced progressive disease, and died sooner.The researchers also found that Hmong donor cells produced significantly less IL-17 than those from Europeans in response to infection with another more common fungus, Candida albicans. Both groups are more likely to have been exposed to this fungus before -; it’s responsible for thrush and common vaginal yeast infections.Klein and Pepperell continue to study genetic vulnerability to Blastomyces, which is part of a family of seven particularly pathogenic fungi that are harmless unless their spores are inhaled and take up residence in the lungs. Pepperell is interested in “zooming out” to see if other genes may be different in Hmong people, since this study looked specifically at immune-related genes and could be missing more of the big picture.For Klein, the work has been “extremely gratifying.” He has studied blastomycosis in Wisconsin since 1981, first as a trainee with the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service, and long worked alongside the late state epidemiologist, Jeff Davis, who passed away just last year. Together, they helped establish Wisconsin as the first state to make it a legally reportable infectious disease.”It’s like: ‘Battle on,'” with this fungus,” Klein says. He appreciates the implications the findings have not just for individual patients, but also for public health more broadly. It also helps lay the groundwork for the future, particularly as plans are forged by UW-Madison to establish the SMPH Center for Human Genomics and Precision Medicine.”This is a great example of the Wisconsin Idea,” Klein says. “This is something we should be doing -; the state and the university working together for the benefit of public health and people in Wisconsin.” Source:University of Wisconsin–MadisonJournal reference:Merkhofer, R.M. et al. (2019) Investigation of Genetic Susceptibility to Blastomycosis Reveals Interleukin-6 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus. mBio. doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01224-19.last_img read more

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18 Jul
2019

Power to the people electricity finally reaches Indian landmark

Citation: Power to the people: electricity finally reaches Indian landmark (2018, March 30) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-power-people-electricity-indian-landmark.html Deepa Bhoir used to sit in darkness outside her island home and stare at Mumbai glowing in the distance. Now she stays up late watching soap operas—one of millions of Indians whose lives have been transformed by a drive to get power to every corner of the country. Bhoir and her husband Sasuram are among hundreds of villagers on the UNESCO world heritage-listed island of Elephanta to have had mains electricity installed in their houses for the first time.Local officials hope tourists, who take a short boat ride from the bustle of Mumbai to visit the island’s famed fifth century caves, will now spend more time and money there, boosting local businesses and jobs.”We’ve waited decades for this and we’re so happy. Now I can watch all my favourite shows without any interruptions. The TV is almost always on!” Bhoir tells AFP, grinning.The island is renowned for its temple caves dating back more than 1,500 years and is home to around 1,200 people.But despite living just 10 kilometres (six miles) from India’s financial capital, islanders have spent much of their lives without power.”Lacking electricity was depressing and we faced numerous hardships,” says Sasuram, explaining that he and Deepa would often sleep outside during the summer to try to keep cool.”It was sweltering inside. We would lie and look at the glittering lights of Mumbai and long for electricity to live fuller and more satisfying lives,” the 54-year-old adds. More than 16,000 Indian villages have been electrified since Prime Minister Narendra Modi was elected in 2014, according to government data Lights finally come on for Indian village Explore further Local officials on Elephanta hope tourists, who take a short boat ride from the bustle of Mumbai to visit the island’s famed fifth century caves, will now spend more time and money there, boosting local businesses and jobs Engineers spent three months laying a seven-kilometre (four mile) undersea cable that connects a mainland substation to transformers in each Elephanta village.In brightly painted homes, ceiling fans whirl at high speed as light bulbs illuminate dark rooms struggling to keep out the stifling early summer heat.”It’s been 70 years since India’s independence and we’ve been promised electricity for so long. I’m just glad to see it before I die,” says 69-year-old Bhagwan Tali.Embracing changeElephanta, also known as Gharapuri, meaning “the city of caves” is a world away from Mumbai. Monkeys outnumber humans and there are no cars on the island, just a miniature railway.The only shops are stalls selling snacks and trinkets for tourists.”My business is weak as most cold drinks, ice creams and chocolates can’t be sold,” says 52-year-old shopkeeper Surekha Bhagat, eagerly waiting for her stall to be hooked up to the grid.Elephanta has one school—for children under 16—and there is no hospital, leaving the elderly and sick vulnerable during a medical emergency. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Every week, Tulsa Bhoir makes the one-hour boat trip to Mumbai to buy fresh vegetables, milk and other foodstuffs. The 43-year-old hopes electricity will spur infrastructure.”I’m excited to see how our island changes for the better,” she tells AFP.Devendra Fadnavis—the chief minister of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital—has said electricity means there is “tremendous scope for tourism” on Elephanta.Every day several thousand people visit the island’s seven caves, which contain ancient Hindu carvings, but leave before the last boat at 5:30 pm and rarely venture into the villages.Officials hope electricity will persuade them to spend the night. Some locals—including Sachin Bhagat, who wants banks and ATMs to open on Elephanta—are already planning to offer their modest houses as homestays.”The villagers aren’t afraid of change but are embracing it,” the 34-year-old says. “We want development so that our lives will become much easier.” A meter was installed in the Bhoirs’ home last month after the Maharashtra state government completed its 250-million-rupee ($3.8-million) electrification project for the island. © 2018 AFP BoredomResidents used kerosene lamps and candles until the late 1980s when they received diesel generators that provided intermittent electricity between 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm every night.They were, however, unreliable and expensive and the limited supply meant the Bhoirs’ two children regularly did their homework by candlelight.Deepa and Sasuram were often unable to charge their phones or other electrical devices. They felt cut off from the world and battled boredom.”We would go to sleep early because there was nothing much to do. But now we stay awake to midnight or 1 am watching our favourite shows. It’s a welcome change,” says Deepa, 43.More than 16,000 Indian villages have been electrified since Prime Minister Narendra Modi was elected in 2014, according to government data. There are still an estimated 33 million households without electricity and Modi wants them all to have power by the end of the year. In brightly painted homes, ceiling fans now whirl at high speed as light bulbs illuminate dark rooms struggling to keep out the stifling early summer heat A couple watch television on Elephanta island near Mumbai, where hundreds of villagers have had mains electricity installed in their houses for the first time read more

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18 Jul
2019

MoviePass operations under investigation by New York AG

first_img Citation: MoviePass operations under investigation by New York AG (2018, October 18) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-moviepass-york-ag.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Parent company Helios and Matheson of New York said in a prepared statement that it is aware of the investigation, but that it believes, “our public disclosures have been complete, timely and truthful and we have not misled investors.”The investigation was first reported by CNBC.Helios and Matheson has struggled financially and is facing class-action lawsuits filed on behalf of investors claiming the company failed to disclose aspects of a business model that were unsustainable.MoviePass drew in millions of subscribers, luring them with a $10 monthly rate. But that proved costly. Because MoviePass typically pays theaters the full cost of tickets—$15 or more in big cities—a single movie can put the service in the red. At one point Helios and Matheson had to take out a $5 million emergency loan to pay its payment processors after missed payments resulted in service outages.Over the summer MoviePass walked back a planned 50 percent price increase following a subscriber backlash. But the company imposed a cap of three movies per month, instead of one every day.Shares of Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc., which is in danger of being delisted by Nasdaq because they had fallen to about a penny, plunged in afternoon trading Thursday. Explore further No price hike, but new caps on MoviePass discount tix plancenter_img The company that runs the beleaguered MoviePass discount service for movie tickets is being investigated by the New York Attorney General on allegations that it misled investors. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This Aug. 23, 2018, file photo shows Movie Pass debit cards and used movie tickets in New York. The company that runs the beleaguered MoviePass, a discount service for movie tickets at theaters, is being investigated by the New York Attorney General on allegations it misled investors. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)last_img read more

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