12 Jan
2020

Father, son charged for killing Mon Repos man

first_imgThe father and son who were arrested after they reportedly stabbed 23-year-old Brian Dwarka of Mon Repos, East Coast Demerara (ECD) to death were on Wednesday arraigned for the indictable offence of murder.Deceased: Brian DwarkaThe men – Suraj Singh, 50, and his son, Andrew Singh, 24, both of Lot 257 Third Street, Mon Repos – appeared before Magistrate Zamina Seepaul-Ally.They were remanded to prison and were expected to re-appear in court on June 28, 2018.Guyana Times had previously reported that on May 27, 2018, Dwarka was stabbed to death while he was attending a barbecue, a short distance away from his home.According to reports, Dwarka was in the company of his friends and cousins when an argument between him and Suraj Singh ensued.The middle-aged man, along with his son, allegedly approached Dwarka and his group, armed with knives.However, while his friends were able to escape, the 23-year-old Mon Repos resident attempted to jump over a fence, but was stabbed once to his chest.Dwarka fell into the yard and onto the ground; he was later picked up by his mother and other relatives and rushed to the Georgetown Public Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival.The two suspects were apprehended – the father at the Georgetown Public Hospital after he reportedly lied to Police, stating that he was attacked and robbed and was sent for a medical, while the younger Singh was found hiding in a toilet in his home.last_img read more

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20 Dec
2019

Brett Anderson lobbies for another former teammate after re-signing with A’s

first_imgMESA, Ariz. — Back in the A’s fold after his one-year deal became official, Brett Anderson is already lobbying for another pitcher from last year’s squad to return to the club.Looking for a place to work out this offseason as he went through free agency, Anderson linked up with Edwin Jackson at the EXOS performance center in Scottsdale. The two actually had a lot in common last season, both bouncing back from a bad season with a solid 2018 in Oakland. Jackson remains unsigned after going 6-3 …last_img

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17 Dec
2019

Vanilla report day from USDA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest No major changes. Boring. No big price spikes up or declines. This comment was heard following the report, “That has to be one of the most subdued post report actions I have seen in a long time.”USDA put US corn ending stocks for 2016-17 at 2.403 billion bushels, unchanged from last month. U.S. soybean ending stocks for 2016-2017 were 480 million bushels also unchanged from last month. U.S. wheat ending stocks were also unchanged at 1.143 billion bushels. U.S. soyoil ending stocks did decline as recent biofuel announcements suggest more soyoil being used.World ending stocks for corn, soybeans, and wheat did increase, no surprise there.Brazil corn production was increased three million tons while Argentina corn production was unchanged at 36.5 million tons. Nobody should be surprised with the Brazil corn production increase.Soybean production in Brazil was estimated at 102 million tons while Argentina soybean production was pegged at 57 million tons. Both are unchanged from November.Prior to the report corn was up 1 cent, soybeans were up six cents, wheat was down two cents. At 12:20 p.m. corn, soybeans, and wheat were all down one cent.Traders were expecting little changes to today’s USDA supply and demand report. This report is a demand report for U.S. grains. There will not be any changes to the 2016 corn and soybean production numbers. USDA will report the final 2016 corn and soybean production numbers on Jan. 12, 2017. That same day USDA will detail US grain stocks as of Dec. 1, 2016. Trade estimates prior to the report had corn and soybean ending stocks changing very little. Those estimates had U.S. corn ending stocks at 2.413 billion bushels, up just 10 million bushels from November. Corn ending stock estimates ranged from 2.364-2.584 billion bushels. Trader estimates had soybean ending stocks at 470 million bushels, down 10 million bushels from November. The soybean ending stocks had a trader estimate of 428-500 million bushels.Weather has once again emerged as a dominant market feature the last two weeks. Now South America weather is capturing lots of attention. Earlier in the week on Tuesday when soybeans were up double digit gains for the first half of the day, producers were active sellers of both old and new crop soybeans. Tuesday soybeans closed up just four cents while earlier in the day they had been up as much as 18 cents. Yesterday, soybeans were down 22 cents as ideas of normal rains for Argentina the next two weeks overshadowed current dry conditions in Argentina and the southern half of Brazil. Corn continues to struggle in a 30 cent trading range, having great difficulty to hold significant daily gains. Wheat is wheat as sellers continue to emerge on higher price activity.With U.S. production numbers not changing this month, we could see the market focus more attention on world grains stocks. Traders were expecting world corn stocks to increase from November. In addition, wheat has been seeing pressure this week due to larger production expected from Canada, Argentina, and Australia.Traders are expecting Brazil soybean production to come in at 102 million tons, up from last year’s 96.5 million tons. Argentina soybean production estimates were 57 million tons, last year they produced 56.8 million tons.One emerging trend we have observed the past few months is that when soybeans are trading higher at the 8:45 am pause, they often have great difficulty closing with those same gains at the 2:20 pm settlement. That trend is even more prevalent when the 8:45 am pause has soybeans up 10 cents or higher. Some would suggest it is a very different crowd that trades grains in the night session from 8:00 pm to 8:45 am compared to the trader activity in the day session from 9:30 am to 2:20 pm.The U.S. Climate Prediction Center forecasts that La Nina will likely remain in the Pacific deep into the winter, fading away by spring. Those conditions will likely bring colder and wetter conditions in the northern U.S. That walks side by side of forecasts all fall calling for a colder than normal winter in the northern U.S. Producers had fantastic weather for harvest activity with normal to above temperatures and below normal rainfall. Today central Ohio has bone chilling temperatures when you factor in the wind. We are seeing temperatures in the teens for lows. Daily highs are struggling to reach 30 degrees easily reminds us that winter is certainly here. Brrrr!Now that the U.S. Presidential election is behind us it is most exciting to see all of the outstanding business people being appointed to cabinet positions. Granted many of those positions will need to be approved by Congress. These appointments seem to be breaking the mold of career politicians holding cabinet positions.Look for the markets to focus on weather, export activity, and what the U.S. Fed does with interest rates later this month. South America weather will keep traders and producers watching with great intensity.It is December. Enjoy all of the Christmas activity with your families!last_img read more

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1 Sep
2019

Duchess Meghan Praises New Zealand on Womens Voting Victory

first_imgBy NICK PERRY, Associated PressWELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — The Duchess of Sussex on Sunday congratulated New Zealand on becoming the first country in the world to allow women to vote 125 years ago, and said that effort had paved the way for others around the world.“Suffrage is not simply about the right to vote but also about what that represents,” Meghan said. “The basic and fundamental human right of being able to participate in the choices for your future, and for your community.”Meghan, Duchess of Sussex receives a “hongi” a traditional Maori welcome on the lawns of Government House in Wellington, New Zealand, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. Prince Harry and his wife Meghan are on day 13 of their 16-day tour of Australia and the South Pacific. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)Meghan and her husband, Prince Harry, are on the final leg of their 16-day tour of the South Pacific, which has taken in four countries.Meghan, who describes herself as a feminist, was speaking to a group of mainly women guests in Wellington that included Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. Meghan got a big cheer when she opened her speech with a greeting in indigenous Maori.The function was designed to celebrate the suffrage anniversary, and Dame Patsy Reddy also got a cheer when she pointed out that she was the nation’s third female governor general andArden was the third female prime minister. The event was delayed after a fire alarm, believed to have been triggered by an atomizer spreading air freshener in a bathroom, forced guests to briefly evacuate the building.Earlier, the couple was greeted with an indigenous Maori welcome.Harry and Meghan each performed a “hongi” with Maori elders, in which they pressed noses together to share a breath. They were welcomed with traditional haka performances and a 21-gun salute at Government House in Wellington, New Zealand’s capital.The couple are scheduled to spend four days in New Zealand, where they will go for a trail walk in a national park, meet young people training to be part of the film industry and visit a hatchery for the national bird, the kiwi.At Government House, a group of children got to meet the royal couple. Minnie Newman, an 11-year-old from Kelburn Girl Guides, said she was impressed with Meghan.“I love her dress and she was really pretty,” Newman said. “She seems really nice and kind and would be good for royalty.”Greta Crowe, 11, said she told the couple that the best part of being a girl guide was getting to meet them. She said Harry responded, “What, waiting around at Government House in the cold?” and the couple both laughed.Hundreds of people gathered outside barriers at the Pukeahu National War Memorial, hoping to catch a glimpse of the couple on their only public walkabout in the capital.Harry and Meghan arrived on the same plane as a number of competitors returning from Sydney’s Invictus Games, which Harry founded in 2014. The games give sick and injured military personnel and veterans the opportunity to compete in sports such as wheelchair basketball.As well as Australia and New Zealand, the couple has also visited Fiji and Tonga on their tour.last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources

first_img © 2017 Phys.org More information: H. S. Sugiarto et al. “Social Cooperation and Disharmony in Communities Mediated through Common Pool Resource Exploitation.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.208301 Citation: Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources (2017, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-phase-transitions-rice-farmers-insight.html Study finds mutual reinforcement of phenotypic diversity and cooperation (Phys.org)—The Balinese subak is a self-organized agrarian society on the island of Bali in Indonesia, whose members must share a limited amount of water for irrigation and rice production. Some of the farmers share the water fairly, and some don’t. As in many societies, the members of the Balinese subak are segregated into different communities. , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further The researchers mapped three clusters of subaks to three phases indicated by the analytical curves: cooperation (circles); disharmony (diamonds); and defection (squares). Credit: H. S. Sugiarto et al. ©2017 American Physical Society Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Now in a new study, scientists have found that this segregation changes a society’s cooperation dynamics and may help to promote cooperation and fair resource utilization at the societal level. The results have implications for managing natural resources, which is of particular relevance for addressing environmental issues such as curbing pollution, reducing deforestation, and saving endangered species—problems that require widespread cooperation.The researchers, H. S. Sugiarto et al., from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and other institutions, have published their results in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the researchers developed a model of social cooperation in self-organized societies that lack central governance, in which individuals are free to choose whether to abide by the rules or not. Their model shows that, as a shared resource becomes more abundant, more individuals may shift from being cooperators (who follow the rules) to being defectors (who violate the rules). At some point, the resource becomes so abundant that all individuals become defectors and social cooperation vanishes.Then the researchers looked at the same scenario, but this time they allowed the society to self-segregate into smaller communities. They found that the downside of the segregation is that it increases the social disharmony throughout the society as a whole. The upside, however, is that the social disharmony within each community becomes very low. In some communities, individuals are more likely to keep cooperating with each other—using the shared resource fairly—compared to the situation without segregation. These results were very similar to what the researchers observed in the segregated society of the Balinese subak.As the researchers explained, the results can be understood in terms of phase transitions. While phase transitions are common in many areas of physics, their role in complex systems, such as human societies, is a newer area of research. In the current study, the shift from cooperators to defectors in a society without segregation as the resource becomes more abundant represents an abrupt phase transition. The researchers explain that segregation “softens” this transition by replacing it with multiple intermediate phases, which arise because some communities are full of cooperators while others are full of defectors. “The greatest significance of our work is in the revelation that stable phases of social and ecological regimes do exist in real-world systems,” coauthor Lock Yue Chew, an associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, told Phys.org. “Our work has also developed mechanistic insights that address a vital question in social science through a more fine-grained and realistic application of ideas from physics.”In the future, the researchers plan to investigate how these results can help improve cooperative behavior in the real world, in order to better manage natural resources.”Our results are relevant to applications where the induction of cooperative social behavior is the primary approach to managing the sustainable use of limited natural resources in the context of coupled human-natural systems,” Chew said. “Potential systems of interest include the forest system, fisheries system, and many others, in addition to the rice production system of Bali in our paper.”Building on these results, in an upcoming paper the researchers report on how stress from pest infestation can affect rice growth, and how it can lead to an optimality in the farmers’ payoff. This work is scheduled to appear in the June 2017 issue of PNAS.last_img read more

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