16 Sep
2020

Fast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 62-57 ACC tournament loss to Miami

first_img Published on March 8, 2017 at 2:19 pm Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossman NEW YORK — In a game Syracuse badly needed as an NCAA Tournament resume booster, it couldn’t come away with a lead in the final minutes against Miami. SU (18-14, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) fell to the Hurricanes (21-10, 10-8), 62-57, and is left to sweat out Selection Sunday in four days.Here’s three reactions to the Orange’s loss in the Barclays Center on Wednesday afternoon.Crunch timeIn the SU’s dramatic wins this season, it’s been able to ditch game-long struggles in the final minutes. While most of those games have been at the Carrier Dome, Syracuse was presented with a similar opportunity in the final three minutes against Miami in the Barclays Center.With a chance to cut the Hurricanes lead to one possession, Tyus Battle slammed an open dunk attempt off the back iron. Ja’Quan Newton came down on the other end of the court to complete the same play to Kamari Murphy and give Miami a five-point lead. But the Hurricanes missed an open layup attempt on its next possession, and John Gillon hit an open 3 to make it a two-point game with about 30 seconds remaining.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter both teams traded baskets again, SU trailed by two again with 12.1 seconds to go. Davon Reed missed the second half of an one-and-one at the free-throw line, giving Syracuse a chance to tie the game with 7.7 seconds left on the clock. Gillon pulled up from 3 at the top of the key, but his shot sailed wide.Battle patted the senior point guard on the back as he leaned over in frustration. There would be no last-second magic for Gillon this time. Pointing downAs we’ve seen all season, Syracuse doesn’t have much of an offense without solid play from its point guards. Specifically, it comes down to Gillon or Frank Howard’s ability to drive the basket. That’s exactly what they didn’t do in the first half, and it cost SU. Neither point guard made a first-half basket, and Gillon, who played the majority of the minutes, compounded his scoreless half with three turnovers and two fouls.The Orange’s offense instead cycled passes around the arc until one of its shooters decided their contested shot was better than the alternatives. SU only saved itself by shooting 52 percent in the first stanza, preserving an eight-point deficit at halftime. A subpar offensive afternoon could have easily put Syracuse down by a significant margin.Gillon didn’t follow through with any drive until five minutes remained in the first half. He tried weaving his way through the Hurricanes defense, only to miss an acrobatic layup attempt he’s tried plenty of times before. The paint didn’t really open up for SU until the latter 10 minutes of the second half, when the Orange entered the bonus. Surprisingly, it was 3-point specialist Andrew White who made the most attempts to get to the rim. He sunk 9-of-10 free throws to make good on Miami’s precarious foul situation.Unfortunately for Syracuse, a shift in offensive strategy came too late.The 6-foot point guard didn’t score his first points of the game about four minutes into the second half, when Tyler Lydon hauled in a rebound and found Gillon open behind the arc. That cut the Orange’s deficit to 38-34.Common enemyIn the Orange’s first game against Miami in January, freshman DJ Vasiljevic made himself known with a career-high 18 points on six 3s. He was the lone offensive bright spot for the Hurricanes in a game remembered for SU’s superb defense. Wednesday’s ACC tournament game wasn’t quite the same defensive showing for either team, but Vasiljevic once again was a thorn for SU.The 6-foot-3 guard made only three of his deep ball attempts en route to a 13-point afternoon, but they swung the game in Miami’s favor at crucial point. His first big strike against the Orange zone came after Battle swung the momentum with a go-ahead 3-pointer midway through the second half. Vasiljevic calmly spotted up behind the arc, answered with a 3-pointer of his own and hit another in the next possession to give Miami a five-point advantage.Even when his 3s didn’t fall, he tested the Orange’s interior defense on the boards. On one occasion, a missed Vasiljevic 3-pointer resulted in Murphy getting fouled around the rim, leading to an 8-0 Miami run after Battle’s 3. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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13 Aug
2020

Governor says keeping Iowa packing plants running ‘essential’

first_imgJOHNSTON — Governor Kim Reynolds says the state’s meat packing plants are complying with the latest safety recommendations and she has no plans to intervene with an executive order that would temporarily close of them.“This isn’t like a regular facility where you shut it down for two weeks,” Reynolds said during her daily news conference. “…We have farmers that are raising hogs…If we aren’t able to move them through the process, at some point we’re going to have to be talking about euthanizing hogs and we’re not far from it and it would be devastating.”The governor said consumers would see pork prices rise, since Iowa produces a third of the nation’s pork supply. The Webster County Board of Supervisors announced this morning 16 employees at Prestage Foods, the pork plant in Eagle Grove, have tested positive for COVID-19 and the state has sent 950 test kits to the plant. The governor announced all the employees of pork plant in Columbus Junction and at the beef plant in Tama have been tested for COVID-19.“We’re going to continue to work with the plants and be proactive,” Reynolds said. “I was on the phone last week with management in every single one of the facilities in the state to check in and to see what they’re doing, to see if we can help in any way and just to help meet the need for their workforce, to keep them up and going.”The beef plant in Tama reopened this morning, but the pork plant in Columbus Junction remains closed. Governor Reynolds said it isn’t a surprise there are outbreaks of the virus at meatpacking facilities because they’re “mass gatherings” of employees.“These processing plants are essential and these workers are essential workforce and so we have to be doing everything that we can collectively,” Reynolds said this morning, pounding the lectern as she spoke. “We should all be working on finding solutions to making sure that we are doing infectious control policies, that we’re making sure that the workforce is protected, but most importantly that we’re keeping that food supply chain moving.”Iowa Department of Public Health deputy director Sarah Reisetter said they are finding positive COVID-19 cases among meatpacking employees who have not been ill or have symptoms like a fever.“If you can’t maintain six-foot social distancing between other people, then you should be considering the use of PPE,” Reisetter said, “which I understand these particular businesses that we’re working are working to accommodate for their employees.”Reynolds said the meat packing plants have been taking the temperatures of employees as they arrive for their shifts, but state officials are now asking that workers be screened for a fever at the END of their workday, too.Reynolds announced this morning COVID-19 outbreaks have been confirmed at two more Iowa nursing homes and 58 coronavirus patients in Iowa hospitals are in critical condition on ventilators. Since March, 79 Iowans have died of COVID-19 and a total of 3159 Iowans have tested positive for the virus.last_img read more

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