26 Jan
2021

The Glee Project’ contestant speaks about true beauty

first_imgThe cast of The Glee Project presented True Beauty at the Carroll Auditorium in Saint Mary’s Madeleva Hall last night. Members of the show discussed their definition of beauty and self esteem as a part of Love Your Body Week. The Glee Project’s contender, Hannah McIalwain, said the True Beauty Program promotes confidence in women’s self-image. “Everyone is going to struggle with some insecurity, but come back to yourself and say, ‘Yes, I am good enough,’” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she struggled with self-image in her younger years but gained confidence before entering high school. She said she became active in school plays and felt happier. When her parents divorced during her junior year, she ate for comfort, McIalwain said. “I felt alone and I continued to gain pounds. This was a low point,” she said. “I had no one else who knew the real me and I portrayed myself as happy and bubbly.” In her senior year, auditions for MTV’s Made arrived at her high school, she said. McIalwain auditioned and landed a spot. The show changed her life, she said. “I went for everything in the show. I turned around and I felt beautiful and confident,” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she attended college at Queens University with a fresh perspective. Though a heartbreak set her back, McIalwain decided to audition for The Glee Project as well. She was chosen to be in the show with eleven other contenders. “This gave me more self-confidence than before, but I still felt like I was not good enough, but each week I kept growing,” McIalwain said. “Eventually, I gained a strong self-confidence out of the show.” The most difficult task in The Glee Project was the week of vulnerability, she said. Contenders wrote their insecurities on a white board and held their sign in front of strangers. “My insecurity was simply, fat. I felt embarrassed before the cameras were on and broke down,” McIalwain said. ” But … It does not define me; it does not matter.” McIalwain said she remained in Los Angeles for two months after the show ended for auditions, but no jobs were offered. She left Hollywood and moved back home with her mother. “I felt like I was being left behind,” McIalwain said. McIalwain said she worked minimum wage jobs until she had enough money to move back to Los Angeles. She is currently looking for more opportunities there, she said. “You have to keep going. All of us are beautiful and perfect,” McIalwain said. Through the True Beauty Project, McIalwain speaks to women about the influence the media, peers and parents have on the definition of beauty. “You have to know your confidence. You have to realize what is beautiful and redefine what beauty is,” McIalwain said.last_img read more

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23 Sep
2020

Winter Heat Challenge this weekend at Perris

first_imgPERRIS, Calif. – Perris Auto Speedway will put a wrap on the Winter Heat Challenge Series this Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 11 and 12.Both shows will feature IMCA Modifieds running for IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Larry Shaw Western Region, Allstar Performance State and track points.Spectator gates open at 2 p.m. each day with racing at 3 p.m.Adult tickets are $15 each day.  Active military with proper ID, students ages 13-18 with their school ID and kids ages 6-12 get in for $5. Children five and under will be admitted free. Through the generosity of the fairgrounds, parking will be free both days.Race teams competing in both shows this weekend will be allowed to camp in the infield overnight on Saturday.The big winner through the first three rounds of the series has been Mother Nature. Most recently, Jan. 7 and 21 events were knocked out by heavy rains.With the possibility of weather moving in this week, fans can keep up to date on the status of weekend’s races on the Perris Auto Speedway Facebook page, the track website (www.perrisautospeedway.com) or by calling the track office at: 951 940-0134.last_img read more

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13 Aug
2020

Citing errors, Iowa removes list of felon voters amid review

first_imgDES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – Iowa election officials have stopped using a long-flawed database of felons who are ineligible to vote as they rebuild it from scratch.Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate’s office removed the database, which contained more than 100,000 entries, from the statewide voter registration system on Jan. 3.Workers are recreating the list by reviewing each entry and adding back those that are verified felony convictions. They hope to complete the review before the November election.Pate spokesman Kevin Hall said newly registered voters, who must attest that they aren’t felons, will be compared against only the verified entries to check their eligibility.For years, the list has been blamed for causing confusion and wrongly disenfranchising some who are eligible voters.Pate’s office told auditors last month that it found “numerous errors” in the database, which included cases that weren’t felony convictions and ridiculous data entry mistakes. It blamed those errors on the Iowa Judicial Branch, which supplies the list’s data.A review by The Associated Press of 700 entries found that 4 percent of the cases weren’t felony convictions and shouldn’t have been included. The AP also found that errors resulted in the Des Moines Police Department and the State of Iowa being listed as felons.last_img read more

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